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Rethinking Equity of Teaching English Language Learners (RETELL) Session 1: Examining Data and Policies Relevant to ELLs Face-to-Face Session Massachusetts.

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Presentation on theme: "Rethinking Equity of Teaching English Language Learners (RETELL) Session 1: Examining Data and Policies Relevant to ELLs Face-to-Face Session Massachusetts."— Presentation transcript:

1 Rethinking Equity of Teaching English Language Learners (RETELL) Session 1: Examining Data and Policies Relevant to ELLs Face-to-Face Session Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

2 Welcome & Course Introduction
Explain how the first part of the lesson today will welcome participants, provide important background information, and overview of the course. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

3 Welcome! My name is (facilitator’s name)
(facilitator contact information ) (insert background information: family, previous teaching experience/jobs, hobbies, etc. You may include pictures) Purpose: To introduce the facilitator Time: 2 min Procedure: Facilitator introduces him/herself and shares a few details about his/her background working with ELLs, teaching, and any other personal information that the facilitator would like to share. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

4 Housekeeping Today’s session: 3 hours Break: (insert time)
Restrooms (insert location) Internet (insert login and password information, if available) Course materials Purpose: To explain important housekeeping details related to the class Time: 3 min Procedure: Facilitator provides information related to the topics on the slide: length of the session, break time, restroom location, internet login information – if available. Facilitator distributes Participant Manuals. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

5 Agenda Introduction to SEI Course and Session 1 (50 min)
Examining Data Related to ELL Achievement and Demographics in MA (45 min) Break (10 min) Shared Responsibility for ELL Instruction and Educational Success (50 min) Assignments and Preparing for Upcoming Sessions (15 min) Moodle Login Help (10 min) Purpose: To describe the activities and pace of the session. Time: 2 min Procedure: Facilitator summarizes the main sections of the first course session. The agenda is in the Participant Manual as well. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

6 Warm-up: “Who’s Like Me?”
Week 1 Slides Warm-up: “Who’s Like Me?” 4/1/2017 Science Teacher Other Teacher Math Teacher ELA Teacher Social Studies Teacher Has taken at least ONE course in 2nd Language Acquisition or Culture (aside from Category Trainings) Has been waiting for a class like this Purpose: To introduce participants to each other Time: 8 min Procedure: Facilitator explains the purpose and instructions for the activity. Purpose– to provide an opportunity for participants to get to know each other and begin building a learning community. Instructions: 1) Participants introduce themselves by saying their name, grade, and the school where they teach. 2) The facilitator reads the statements on the slide. Each participant stands up when the statement refers to him/her and say “That’s me!” For example, if a participant went to Cancun last July for vacation, when the facilitator reads ‘Went away for a vacation this year’ he or she would stand up and say “That’s me!” Is anxious about taking this course Is open to trying out strategies learned in this course Went away for vacation this year Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

7 Why are we here? RETELL The Rethinking Equity and Teaching for ELLs (RETELL) initiative is designed to provide ELLs access to effective instruction and close proficiency gaps. ELL Student Global Development WIDA English Language Development Standards ACCESS for ELLs Assessment Sheltered English Instruction (SEI) Endorsement & Course Purpose: To provide background on the RETELL initiative Time: 3 min Procedure: Facilitator summarizes the slide focusing on talking points outlined below. Talking Points: The RETELL initiative is designed to provide ELLs access to effective instruction and close proficiency gaps. The RETELL initiative is a comprehensive approach including three key components: adoption and implementation of the WIDA English Language Development Standards, monitoring student progress through the ACCESS for ELLs assessment, and professional development on effective instruction for ELLs through the SEI Teacher and Administrator Endorsements and corresponding courses. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

8 Why are we here? The SEI Endorsement Teacher Course
Core academic teachers who work with ELLs (SEI Teachers) are required to obtain the SEI Teacher Endorsement in order to advance, extend, or renew their license(s). The SEI Course provides a foundation of understanding, knowledge, and skills critical to effective Sheltered English Instruction (SEI) in core academic areas. Educators assigned to an SEI Course must earn the SEI Endorsement within a year. Purpose: To provide background on the SEI Endorsement requirements and the SEI Endorsement Teacher Course Time: 5 min Procedure: Facilitator summarizes the slide focusing on talking points outlined below. Talking Points: Core academic teachers who work with ELLs (SEI Teachers) are required to obtain the SEI Teacher Endorsement in order to advance, extend, or renew their license(s). Core academic teacher is defined as “early childhood and elementary teachers, teachers of students with moderate disabilities, teachers of students with severe disabilities, and teachers of the following academic subjects: English, reading or language arts, mathematics, science, civics and government, economics, history, and geography.” 603 CMR 7.02 and 603 CMR 14.07(5). 2) The purpose of the SEI Endorsement Teacher Course is to equip educators who work with ELLs with strategies and tools for promoting academic language development and making instruction comprehensible for ELLs. 3) Educators assigned to an SEI Course must earn the SEI Endorsement within a year. There are 4 ways to earn the SEI Endorsement: obtaining an ESL license, possessing an advanced degree in specified fields (i.e., Applied Linguistics), or passing the SEI MTEL (available Summer 2014). Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

9 SEI Teacher Course Syllabus
Participant Manual Course content overview Module A: ELLs – Their World and Second Language Acquisition in the SEI Classroom (Sessions 1-4) Module B: Teaching Academic Language and Sheltering Content in Core Academic Classrooms (Sessions 5-16) Embedded Themes: WIDA Standards, 2011 Curriculum Frameworks, differentiation, assessment Course format Purpose: To provide an overview of the SEI Teacher Course syllabus Time: 6 min Procedure: Facilitator summarizes the slide focusing on talking points outlined below. Talking Points: 1) The Participant Manual has the course syllabus and accompanying handouts for each session. Participants should bring their Manuals to every face-to-face session and should have it at hand while completing online sessions. 2) The course has two parts or Modules: Module A– introduces participants to the world of ELLs by analyzing demographic and academic achievement information, exploring social and cultural aspects related to the instruction of ELLs, and learning about the process of second language acquisition. Module B– goes deeper into best practices for developing ELLs language and academic skills focusing on 3 key areas–Vocabulary Development, Reading, and Writing. Module B has a very specific approach: modeling of new strategies by the facilitator, opportunities for participants to practice the strategies, and opportunities for participants to communicate their experiences and discuss with other participants. The final two sessions provide opportunities for reflection and collaboration on the course capstone project. 3) Embedded themes throughout the course: WIDA ELD and Common Core standards, differentiation of instruction based on language proficiency levels and other key factors, and assessment of ELLs. 4) Course format: 11 face-to-face sessions (each 3 hours long) and 5 online sessions (each approx. 2-3 hours long). 5) Required readings and additional resources are available on Moodle. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

10 SEI Course Syllabus: Attendance Policy
Attendance taken at every face-to-face meeting Face-to-face meeting tardiness 5-30 minutes tardy: 2% deducted from final course grade 30 minutes tardy: equivalent to absence No participant with more than two class absences will be eligible for the SEI endorsement Hardship clause Purpose: To provide an overview of the SEI Teacher Course attendance policy Time: 2 min Procedure: Facilitator summarizes the slide focusing on talking points outlined below. Attendance policy is also included in the syllabus. Talking Points: Attendance is very important. Tardiness and absences can affect whether a participant earns the SEI Endorsement at the end of the course. If a participant is assigned to the course and is unable to complete the course due to serious illness or injury, or other circumstance beyond the educator’s control, he or she may ask the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education for a hardship exception allowing additional time to meet requirements for the SEI Endorsement. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

11 SEI Course Syllabus: Grading & Participation
Pass/fail or grade option Pass/fail = C or above Must pass to earn Endorsement Grading policy described in the syllabus Purpose: To provide an overview of the SEI Teacher Course grading and participation policy Time: 2 min Procedure: Facilitator summarizes the slide focusing on talking points outlined below. Grading and participation policy are also included in the syllabus. Talking Points: Participants can take the course pass/fail or for credit. In order to pass, participants need a grade of C or above. Participants must pass course to earn the Endorsement. Participation is worth 15% of final grade. Participation in online assignments and forums will also be factored into the final grade. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

12 Completing the SEI Course: PDPs, Graduate Credit, and ELAR
PDPs available upon completion of the SEI Teacher course 67.5 PDPs PDPs are issued by ESE at completion of course Graduate course credit available SEI Teacher course equivalent to 3 graduate credits Participants are responsible for completing licensure process for earning SEI Endorsement on ELAR. Purpose: To provide an overview of PDP/graduate credit opportunities Time: 2 min Procedure: Facilitator summarizes the slide focusing on talking points outlined below. Talking Points: Participants can earn 67.5 PDPs upon completing the course. PDP certificates are issued by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education once the Facilitator uploads information about which participants successfully completed/passed the course. Graduate course credit is also available. The course is worth 3 graduate credit points. Additional information about how to obtain graduate credit will be provided. Course participants are responsible for completing licensure process for earning SEI Endorsement on ELAR. Instructions will be discussed later on in the course. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

13 Online Component Five online sessions, required readings, assignments
Moodle troubleshooting – Help desk Office Hours: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM, M-F Phone: Today: Logging into Moodle Purpose: To introduce Moodle, the course’s online component Time: 2 min Procedure: Facilitator summarizes the slide focusing on talking points outlined below. Other: Moodle help desk Office Hours: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM, M-F Phone: Talking Points: The course’s 5 online sessions are on Moodle. Moodle also has required readings and specific assignments to be completed online. Several assignments will also be submitted unto Moodle. Instructions for Moodle login are available on the session 1 handouts in the Participant Manual. The facilitator will provide additional time to train participants about how to log into Moodle during the last 10 minutes of the session. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

14 Course Expectations: Session Norms
What norms should guide our sessions and online discussions? Basic Guidelines for Discussion Are they clear? Is there anything missing? Purpose: To set up common norms. Time: 7 min Procedure: Facilitator explores guidelines for discussion and sets up norms with participants. Other: The Basic Guidelines for Class Discussion are on p. 4 of the Participant Manual Talking Points: Highlight how norms are important in order to develop a caring, reflecting learning community. Ask participants for their ideas of useful norms. Discuss key ideas: We all bring different experiences and backgrounds, so the guidelines help clarify expectations for interaction in order to establish a positive/safe and respectful environment. Guidelines can be modified at any time during the course. Participants can point to the guidelines instead of individual preferences if any agreed upon behavior is being disregarded. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

15 SEI Teacher Endorsement Course Map
Purpose: To highlight where Session 1 fits in the larger context of the course. Time: 1 min Procedure: Facilitator explains how Session 1 sets the stage for understanding the ELL student population in MA, legal and curricular expectations for ELL instruction and the need to develop a collaborative approach for promoting ELL language development and academic achievement. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

16 Session 1: Examining Data and Policies Related to English Language Learners
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

17 Session 1 Objectives Define responsibilities for completing the SEI Course and obtaining Endorsement. (CMR 7.4) Manage all course logistics, including: meeting attendance and assignment/participation expectations; employing Moodle tools; applying for graduate credit; completing ELAR affidavit; staying abreast of course changes. Purpose: To explain Session 1 objectives. Time: 5 min, 2 slides Procedure: Facilitator summarizes session objectives. These can also be found in the Participant Manual. Talking Points: 1) Session objectives are derived from the “subject matter knowledge ” required for the SEI Endorsement according to licensure regulations. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

18 Objectives Understand and acknowledge the importance of sharing responsibility for the instruction and academic achievement of ELLs Demonstrate a working knowledge of ELL demographics and academic achievement in MA, and implications for instruction Identify relevant federal and state laws pertaining to ELLs and explain resulting implications for teaching and learning of ELLs Research and evaluate school policies with regard to ELLs Purpose: To explain Session 1 objectives. Time: 5 min, 2 slides Procedure: Facilitator summarizes session objectives. These can also be found in the Participant Manual. Talking Points (continued): 2) After session 1, participants will be able to: Understand and acknowledge the importance of sharing responsibility for the instruction and academic achievement of ELLs (SEIT 7) Demonstrate a working knowledge of ELL demographics and academic achievement in MA, and implications for instruction (SEIT 7) Identify relevant federal and state laws pertaining to ELLs and explain resulting implications for teaching and learning of ELLs (SEIT 6) Research and evaluate school policies with regard to ELLs (SEIT 6,7) Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

19 What do you already know about English Language Learners (ELLs)?
Complete the Anticipation Guide These statements set the stage for topics covered throughout the course Be as honest as possible! Purpose: To activate prior knowledge about English Language Learners Time: 3 min Procedure: Facilitator gives instructions for completing the Anticipation Guide found in the Participant Manual. Talking Points: Answers to the Anticipation Guide will be discussed throughout the course. Participants can refer back to this Anticipation Guide as an indicator of their baseline knowledge of ELL instruction, and note progress. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

20 Examining Data Related to ELL Achievement and Demographics in Massachusetts
This slide marks the next section of the session: Examining Data Related to ELL Achievement and Demographics in Massachusetts. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

21 Who is an ELL? Quick Write
Who is an English Language Learner? Write your own definition. Purpose: To explore participants’ definitions of the term “English Language Learner” – ELL Time: 2 min Procedure: Facilitator asks participants to write their definitions of the term ELL in preparation for the data analysis activity of this section. Talking Points: Participants can write their definitions on the notes section of their Participant Manuals Explain how this strategy is known as a Quick Write. It’s a helpful strategy for activating students’ prior knowledge about a specific topic and gathering information about their thoughts and ideas. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

22 Who is an ELL? Multiple Definitions:
MA: English Language Learner (ELL) Federal: Limited English Proficient (LEP) Definition embedded within WIDA ELD Standards Guiding Principles What do the WIDA Guiding Principles suggest about WIDA’s definition of ELLs? What are the instructional implications of these definitions? Purpose: To establish a common definition for the term “English Language Learner” – ELL Time: 5 min Procedure: Facilitator reviews state, federal, and WIDA definitions for the term ELL. Definitions appear in the Participant Manual. Ask participants to read state and federal definitions and compare and contrast them. Ask participants to read the WIDA Guiding Principles of Second Language Acquisition. Ask participants to draw conclusions about a possible WIDA definition for the term ELL. Talking Points: WIDA would have a different definition for ELLs: it does not define ELLs as lacking skills or language, but rather recognizes what ELLs bring to the classroom as a resource. Discuss instructional implications of these definitions, or how the different definitions influence teachers’ attitudes towards ELLs: thinking about ELLs as lacking could result in lowered expectations and watered down curricula instead of focusing on promoting what ELLs can accomplish. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

23 Who is an ELL? Deficit-based vs. Asset-based view of ELLs “Approached from a deficit perspective, students who are English language learners (ELL) are often defined as fundamentally lacking. By contrast, asset-based perspective builds on the home language of students and recognizes this as a fundamental strength.” Purpose: To continue highlighting the importance of an asset-based view of ELLs and instructional implications Time: 1 min Procedure: Facilitator reviews state, federal and WIDA definitions for the term ELL. Definitions appear in the Participant Manual. Talking Points: Discuss how different points of view about ELLs can have huge instructional implications. 1) If ELLs are fundamentally lacking, then they must be “filled up.” ELLs are always instructionally poor, and in need, while the teacher is always rich, always giving, and never in need of learning. 2) If ELLs bring assets to school, then teachers can use what ELLs bring and help them build new knowledge and skills. Teachers can always learn from what the students bring. Source: Scanlan, Martin. "An asset-based approach to linguistic diversity." Focus on Teacher Education (2007). Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

24 MA ELL Achievement and Demographic Data with Sentence Frames
What do you think the data will show? Why? I think the data will show that ___ because ___. Purpose: To introduce a data analysis activity Time: 2 min Procedure: Facilitator provides an overview of the data analysis activity and elicits predictions about ELL achievement and demographic data in MA. Instructions for the data analysis activity: Participants will use sentence frames to analyze MA ELL data. First, they will make predictions about the data. Then the facilitator will model analyzing data. Finally, participants will work in groups to analyze data and present conclusions to the whole group. Talking Points: Sentence frames are a useful strategy for ELLs because they provide linguistic forms that help ELLs negotiate meaning and express their ideas. This is a strategy that works with ELLs at various language proficiency levels because the complexity of the sentences can be modified to fit the linguistic expectations for each proficiency level. Provide sentence frames for participants to use when making predictions: I think the data will show that ___ because ___. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

25 MA ELL Demographic Data: Changing District Demographics
Purpose: To model how participants can use sentence frames to analyze MA ELL demographic data Time: 5 min Procedure: Facilitator asks participants guiding questions for analyzing data: What do you see? What inferences/conclusions can you draw from this data? Do you have any questions? Is there anything else you want to know about? Facilitator models potential answers to the questions and highlight sentence frames participants can use for each type of question: Observation: I see that the total number of districts with at least 1 ELL increased more than the number of districts with 100 or more ELLs in the last 11 years. The total number of districts with at least 1 ELL increased by 137, while the number of districts with 100 ELLs or more increased by 13. Inference: I think this means that many more of MA educators now teach at least 1 ELL than in 2000. Additional Questions: I wonder whether they have a map where I can see where the number of enrolled ELLs has increased in MA. Is there at least 1 ELL in each MA school district? Ask Participants to share other observations, inferences, or additional questions about this data Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

26 MA ELL Achievement and Demographic Data
Analyze the data with your group Make observations: I see ___. Make inferences: I think this means ___. Ask questions: I wonder about ___. I would like to know more about ___. Present your data to the class & make connections: Our data is closely related to group _’s data because __. On the other hand, our data suggests that ___. Purpose: To explain how participants will finalize the data analysis activity and provide time for group work Time: 10 min Procedure: Divide the class into 5 groups. The first four groups will take their corresponding section from the Analyzing Massachusetts’ ELL Achievement and Demographic Data handout of the Participant Manual. The 5th group will analyze sections 5 and 6 of the handout. Encourage participants to use the sentence frames on the slide while they work in groups. Give groups time to record observations, inferences, and questions on chart paper. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

27 MA ELL Achievement and Demographic Data
Present your data to the class & make connections: Our data is closely related to group _’s data because __. On the other hand, our data suggests that ___. Purpose: To finalize the data analysis activity Procedure: Explain how the groups will now present their observations, inferences, and additional questions. Encourage participants to listen carefully and write notes about connections among data using new sentence frames. After all groups have shared, ask participants to share any information that they found interesting, new, or puzzling. Talking Points: The ELL population in MA is rapidly growing. Certain urban centers concentrate a large portion of the total state ELL population but many districts across the state now serve ELLs. ELL student achievement lags behind that of their native English speaking peers. The majority of ELLs are in elementary school: pre-k and 5th grade. Spanish is the most common first language spoken by ELLs in MA. There is a capacity issue: many more teachers now work with ELLs, but they are not necessarily equipped to work effectively with this population. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

28 District and School ELL Data
Purpose: To introduce the next data analysis activity – district and school data Time: 2 min Procedure: Facilitator frames the discussion by asking three questions and allowing participants to share: How are ELLs doing in your district? If you don’t know much, but want to find out, where would you go? What type of data would you like to find out about? Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

29 DART for ELLs Tool District Analysis and Review Tools (DARTs)
Offer snapshots of district and school performance Users can track select data elements over time and make comparisons to the state or to "comparable" districts. Types of data on the DART Detail: ELLs Demographics (% ELL, Former ELL, Special Ed) Common languages and countries of origin MCAS and MEPA results, “Achievement Gaps” District and school overview Purpose: To introduce the DART for ELLs Tool Time: 1 min Procedure: Facilitator summarizes key information on the slide. Other: DART stands for District Analysis and Review Tools. These files combine ELL data collected by ESE. They offers snapshots of district and school performance and allow users to track select data elements over time and make comparisons to the state or to "comparable" districts. DART for ELLs is an Excel file and can be downloaded from the ESE website – the link appears on p.12 of the Participant Manual. Talking Points: The DART for ELLs file has demographic data (% ELL, Former ELL, Special Ed) as well as information about common languages and country of origin, MCAS and MEPA results, and “Achievement Gaps” between ELLs and Native English speakers, at the district and school level. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

30 Analyzing ELL Data from Participants’ Districts
Look over the DART reports. District Overview School Overview Achievement Gap MCAS and MEPA Make observations and inferences on your own. Go over the guiding questions with a partner. Share with the whole group. Are there any salient points about the data? Purpose: To introduce and facilitate the district data analysis activity. Time: 15 min Procedure: Facilitator provides instruction for the activity. Participants will look over the DART reports printed by the facilitator individually. Participants will go over the guiding questions from their Participant Manual with a partner. Participants will share salient points with the whole group. Other: The CPI is a Measure of improvement over the last four years. The Achievement Gaps report illustrate differences in Composite Performance Index (CPI) scores for ELA (at the top of the page) and mathematics (at the bottom of the page). The graphs allow comparisons of CPI trends in both subjects among three groups: ELL students, Formerly ELL (FELL) students, and non-ELL/non-FELL students in all tested grades. Six graphs allow users to view separately ELA and math for the target district, comparable district, and the state. For more information on CPI, see Talking Points: Participants from different districts will have different data so teachers will arrive at different conclusions. The role of the facilitator is to lead the discussion using the guiding questions. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

31 Break (10 minutes) Purpose: To introduce the break Time: 10 min
Procedure: Facilitator provides instruction for the break and what time participants should return to class. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

32 Shared Responsibility for ELL Instruction and Educational Success
This slide marks the next section of the session: Shared Responsibility for ELL Instruction and Educational Success Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

33 Civil Rights and English Language Learners
Ensuring ELLs have equal access to high quality education is a civil rights issue Federal laws, guidance, and court cases to support ELLs’ rights: Civil Rights Act, 1964 Equal Educational Opportunity Act (EEOA), 1974 Lau vs. Nichols, 1974 Castañeda v. Pickard, 1981 Office of Civil Rights Guidelines NCLB Title III, 2002 Purpose: To introduce laws and regulations in place to ensure ELLs have equal access to high quality education Time: 2 min. Procedure: Facilitator introduces the many laws and regulations established to ensure ELLs have equal educational opportunity /access to high quality education. Summarize key laws, guidance, and court cases on the slide. Talking Points: American language policy changed as a result of the Civil Rights Movement. Today there are several laws and regulations to ensure ELLs have equal access to high quality education. Both the federal government and the state of MA have actively protected the educational rights of ELLs. Federal level laws, guidance, and court cases protecting ELLs rights: Civil Rights Act, 1964 ; Equal Educational Opportunity Act (EEOA), 1974; Lau vs. Nichols, 1974; Castañeda v. Pickard, 1981; Office of Civil Rights Guidelines; NCLB Title III, 2002 33 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

34 Civil Rights and English Language Learners
Massachusetts ELL laws and regulations MA Education Reform Act, 1993 Ballot Question 2 Title III priorities in MA RETELL Regulations Federal and state ELL policy Discussion: Expert Groups (EG) Jigsaw Federal Policy MA State Policy Purpose: To introduce laws and regulations in place to ensure ELLs have equal access to high quality education and introduce the next activity Time: 2 min Procedure: Facilitator summarizes key state laws and regulations on the slide. Facilitator provides preliminary instructions for the jigsaw activity and designates each participant as a member of one of the two Expert Groups. Facilitator “numbers off” the participants: 1 = Federal Policy; 2 = State Policy Talking Points: MA state laws and regulations pertaining to ELLs: MA Education Reform Act, 1993; Ballot Question 2; Title III priorities in MA; RETELL Regulations. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

35 Civil Rights and English Language Learners Jigsaw
1. Discuss with a partner in your EG 2. Discuss with a partner from a different EG 3. Whole group discussion What are the key messages embedded in laws and regulations pertaining the education of ELLs? How are federal and state policy related? Are there any differences between federal and MA policies? Did you find anything interesting or new? Purpose: To provide final instructions and facilitate the jigsaw activity Time: 16 min Procedure: Facilitator provides final instructions for the jigsaw Participants will read and summarize key laws and regulations for ensuring ELLs have equal access to quality education with a partner from the SAME expert group for 5 minutes. Participants will share with a partner from a DIFFERENT expert group for 5 minutes. Participants will share ideas as a whole group for 5 minutes. Talking Points: Use guiding questions from the slide. During the whole group discussion, facilitator asks: According to federal and state law, who is responsible for the academic achievement and language development of ELLs? Note: If participants need more time to share ideas in their expert groups or with a partner from a different expert group, feel free to give them more time. However, this means that the whole group discussion will be shorter. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

36 ELL Achievement as a Community Effort
Purpose: To introduce the section on shared responsibility Time: 1 min Talking Point: The legal foundation for ELL instruction and state demographic and achievement data highlight the importance of collaboration in order to support the success of ELLs in school. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

37 Two Required Components for Academic Program for ELLs in MA
Required Components for Instruction of ELLS Meaningful Access to Curriculum English Language Development (ESL/ELD) Explicit, direct instruction to promote English language development Sheltered English Instruction (SEI) Bilingual or Dual Language Instruction Purpose: To introduce the current structure of ELL programs in MA Time: 1 min. Procedure: Facilitator summarizes key ideas in the slide. Talking Points: 1) ESL classes provide explicit, direct instruction about the English language to promote language development. ESL classes can include content area objectives, but focus on developing linguistic and cultural competencies that ELLs require beyond what their Native-English speaking peers need. These classes are important for ELLs at all levels of language proficiency because language proficiency is necessary to access school curriculum and to achieve positive academic outcomes. 2) SEI instruction includes approaches, strategies, and methodology that makes the content comprehensible to ELLs and promotes language development. ELLs traditionally receive SEI instruction in content area classes (Social Studies, science, math and ELA). 3) There are no regulations regarding the type of program that districts have to have for ELLs. Under structured English immersion districts are able to choose which type of classes they offer ELLs. Districts are only required to demonstrate that ELLs receive rigorous content area and language instruction in ways appropriate for their level of English language proficiency. Instruction that includes approaches, strategies, and methodology that makes the content comprehensible and promotes academic English language development Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

38 Who’s Responsible for ELLs’ Success in School?
Jot down some ideas in response to this question. Consider: Federal and state laws and regulations Your experience as a teacher Purpose: To introduce the idea of shared responsibility Time: 5 min. Procedure: Facilitator introduces the activity. Facilitator asks: “Given the current ELL programs in MA, who is responsible for ELLs’ success in school?” Facilitator gives participants some time to answer this question. Facilitator elicits responses from participants and makes a graphic organizer on a chart paper to note responses. Facilitator prompts participants to elaborate on their answers (e.g., asking Why do you think so?) Talking points: There are many important stakeholders who are responsible for ensuring ELLs succeed in school, some of which are technically outside the school. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

39 Who’s Responsible for ELLs’ Success in School?
“Who’s responsible for student learning? Walk into an effective school and ask this question of anyone – a teacher, a student, the principal, a parent volunteer, a secretary – and you’ll get the same answer: I am.” (Conzemius & O’Neill, 2001) “It is time to break the bad habit of expecting something from nothing, from our government or from each other. Let us all take more responsibility, not only for ourselves and our families, but for our communities and our country.” (Clinton, 1993) Purpose: To continue highlighting the idea of shared responsibility Time: 3 min. Procedure: Facilitator asks for a volunteer to read the quotes. Facilitator elicits comments from the participants about the quotes, asking: According to these quotes, who’s responsible for ELLs’ success in school? Do you agree or disagree with the quotes? How does our graphic organizer compare with what Clinton, O’Neill and Conzemius say? Talking points: Highlight stakeholders in the quotes that other groups previously included in their posters. Point out any groups mentioned in the quote that were left out of the graphic organizers. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

40 Who’s Responsible for Chia’s Success in School?
Chia grew up in a poor neighborhood ravaged by gangs. After her mother died of cancer, her aunt was forced to adopt her. She moved to MA two months ago. Although she knows no English, she’s very outgoing. Purpose: To continue highlighting the idea of shared responsibility Time: 3 min. Procedure: Facilitator asks a volunteer to read Chia’s story. Facilitator directs participants to discuss with partners using the prompt on the blue box: Imagine that Chia is in your school. What are some issues that you need to address in order to help her succeed in school? Participants share their responses as a whole group. Talking points: Background on Chia: Chia’s story is based on a real life MA ELL student. Chia’s teachers worked with Chia to help her cope with her mother’s loss, the move to America, and learning English. Mrs. Tikas, her science teacher, brought her snacks and checked in with Chia even after Chia had passed on to the next grade. Mrs. Lowry, the special education/ESL teacher, and Mrs. Myrta, her ELL teacher, worked collaborativly to address Chia’s content area gaps. Even Mrs. Forland, the school principal, took Chia skiing and swimming with her family during school breaks. Two years after arriving in the US, Chia enrolled in a vocational high school. She’s doing very well and says she loves school. Imagine that Chia is in your school. What are some issues that you need to address in order to help her succeed in school? Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

41 Who’s Responsible for Ernesto’s Success in School?
Ernesto lived with a nanny while his parents started a business in the U.S. He skipped school between grades 3-7, and is now in 8th grade. He’s a math whiz because his grandfather taught him at home. Ernesto can understand quite a bit of English but has a hard time writing or speaking it. His parents’ business is about to go under, and he’s very worried. Purpose: To continue highlighting the idea of shared responsibility Time: 3 min. Procedure: Facilitator asks a volunteer to read Ernesto’s story. Facilitator directs participants to discuss with partners using the prompt on the blue box: Imagine that Ernesto is in your school. What can educators in your school do to support Ernesto? Participants share their responses as a whole group. Talking points: Background on Ernesto’s story: Ernesto’s story is based on a real life MA ELL student. Although his math skills were excellent, he struggled to communicate his ideas in English and that frustrated him. Because of scheduling issues, Ernesto was not able to attend the advanced math class. Mr. Perkins, his math teacher, and Mrs. Khadka, his ESL teacher, collaborated a few times to provide rigorous math content at a language level appropriate for Ernesto. Eventually his parents had to close down their restaurant, so Ernesto had to go back to his home country to live with his nanny. Imagine that Ernesto is in your school. What can educators in your school do to support Ernesto? Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

42 Who’s Responsible for ELLs’ Success in School?
Laws and regulations promote shared responsibility for ELLs’ success Research about effective schools highlights the impact of shared responsibility Curricular expectations also support this idea: WIDA ELD Standards 2011 MA Curriculum Frameworks Purpose: To continue highlighting the idea of shared responsibility Time: 1 min. Procedure: Facilitator summarizes key points in the slide and talking points. Talking points: 1) Laws and regulations promote shared responsibility for ELLs’ success. 2) Research about effective schools highlights the impact of shared responsibility. 3) In MA, the WIDA ELD standards and 2011 MA Curriculum Frameworks expect content area and ESL teachers to focus on promoting academic language development and academic achievement of ELLs. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

43 WIDA ELD Standards Span Across Core Academic Areas
ELLs communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success through the… Social Instructional Language Language of Language Arts Language of Mathematics Language of Science Language of Social Studies Purpose: To show how the WIDA ELD standards promote shared responsibility for ELLs’ success Time: 1 min. Procedure: Facilitator summarizes key points in the slide and talking points. Other: The 5 WIDA ELD standards are: English language learners communicate for Social and Instructional purposes within the school setting. English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Language Arts. English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Mathematics. English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Science. English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. Talking points: The WIDA ELD standards span across core content areas. These standards recognize the importance of promoting ELLs’ language development throughout the school day, and not just in ESL classrooms. 2) Full implementation of the standards will require ESL and content area teachers working together to bring the WIDA framework to life. Academic Language

44 2011 MA Frameworks Expectations
What do the 2011 MA Curriculum Frameworks for ELA and Literacy say about ELLs? Purpose: To show how the 2011 MA ELA and Math Frameworks promote shared responsibility for ELLs’ success Time: 2 min. Procedure: Facilitator asks participants to read aloud key underlined quotes from the 2011 ELA and Literacy Curriculum Frameworks handout in the Participant Manual. Talking points: ELA standards promote development across all language domains: reading, listening, speaking, writing. Standards for ELA include Literacy in History/Social Studies, Sciences, and Technical Subjects. The Frameworks ”integrated Model of Literacy and Shared Responsibility for Students’ Literacy Development” sets a clear expectation that all teachers who interact with students will focus on developing literacy skills. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

45 2011 MA Frameworks: Expectations for ELL instruction
Engagement with same Common Core standards as their Native English speaking peers Teachers and school /district staff are well prepared and qualified Literacy-rich school environments Coursework preparing ELLs for college and the workplace that is comprehensible for students learning a second language Opportunities for classroom discourse and interaction Source : 2011 MA Frameworks for ELA and Literacy, p.83 Purpose: To highlight the 2011 MA ELA and Math Frameworks’ expectations for ELL instruction Time: 2 min. Procedure: Facilitator summarizes ideas in the slide and talking points. Facilitator encourages participants to discuss instructional implications of these expectations using the slide prompt: What does this mean for you as a teacher of ELLs? Talking points: 1) The 2011 Frameworks also set expectations for ELL instruction that highlight the need for shared responsibility. ELLs are entitled to: Engagement with same Common Core standards as their Native English speaking peers Teachers and school /district staff are well prepared and qualified Literacy-rich school environments Coursework preparing ELLs for college and the workplace that is comprehensible for students learning a second language Opportunities for classroom discourse and interaction 2) This means that all teachers of ELLs are working together to provide access to the content area standards and promote language development in ways that are comprehensible to ELLs – or in ways appropriate for ELLs’ language proficiency level. What does this mean for you as a teacher of ELLs? Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

46 Purpose: To emphasize how shared responsibility is a more efficient way to promote success for ALL students Time: 1 min. Procedure: Facilitator asks participants to read the dialog bubbles. Facilitator asks: “What does this have to do with teaching ELLs?” Talking points: Some of the expectations and practices that help ELLs also help Native English speakers and students with disabilities access rigorous content standards. Research shows that when all teachers share best practices and ensure their instruction provides for diverse needs, all students benefit (these are the principles behind Universal Design for Learning – UDL) Retrieved online 714/2012: https://dst.sp.maricopa.edu/DWG/disability/ /Webinar.ppt Slideshow: Melanie Thompson, Ed.S., NCC, LPC, LMHC, Director, Center for Access-Ability Resources, Northern Illinois University

47 We Can Do Better! Source: DART for ELLs 2012
Purpose: To encourage participants to take action because of the current ELL achievement gap Time: 2 min. Procedure: Facilitator presents the graph and summarizes key talking points Talking points: The graph shows CPI of different populations: Non-Former ELL/Non-ELL in dark blue, Formerly ELL on light blue, and ELL in yellow. The CPI is a measure of how students are improving toward meeting targets set for specific populations on seven core indicators: narrowing proficiency gaps (English language arts (ELA), mathematics, and science); growth (ELA and mathematics); the annual dropout rate; and the cohort graduation rate. The red line shows what it means to be “on target” toward meeting goals: a CPI of 75%. Clearly ELLs lag behind on these very important indicators – not just test scores, but also drop out and graduation rates. We can do better! Source: DART for ELLs 2012 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

48 Who’s Responsible for ELLs’ Success in School? Think Pair Share
How can different groups support ELLs’ language development and academic achievement? Brainstorm concrete actions for each group individually Pair with a friend and discuss Share with the class Purpose: To encourage participants to think about concrete actions to support ELLs’ success in school Time: 5 min. Procedure: 1) Facilitator provides instructions for the activity: Brainstorm concrete actions for each group individually. Pair with a friend and discuss. Share with the class. 2) Facilitator moderates whole group discussion and updates graphic organizer from the beginning of the section. Talking points: Make sure that educators recognize how they need to promote involvement with parents and also tap into community resources in order to effectively support ELLs. Some community resources: mentoring clubs (such as the Boys and Girls Club), sports clubs (such as YMCA), cultural groups, churches, public libraries and other services, etc. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

49 Assignments & Preparing for Upcoming Sessions
Purpose: To summarize key learning points and highlight upcoming assignments and sessions Time: 2 min. Procedure: Facilitator summarizes key learning points highlighted in the talking points. Talking points: Participants are responsible for completing the SEI Teacher Endorsement course in order to earn the SEI Teacher Endorsement now required of teachers who work with ELLs. The Endorsement and course are part of the RETELL initiative, designed to help improve ELLs’ academic achievement. The entire school community is responsible for the instruction and academic achievement of ELLs. Outside schools, families and community members also need to support ELL learning. The ELL population in MA has grown rapidly in the last few years. However, there are persistent proficiency gaps between ELLs and their native English speaking peers. Several federal and state laws protect the rights of ELLs to have equal access to quality education in the US and MA. In MA, current laws have resulted in a model of language programming that provides ELL services through ESL and SEI classes. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

50 Assignments due by Session 2
Journal Entries on Moodle: Reflect on two effective instructional activities for ELLs demonstrated today. Summarize three key ideas from today’s session and explain why they are significant to your teaching practice. Follow up assigned reading: 2011 MA Curriculum Frameworks for ELA & Literacy (p. 5, 83). Purpose: To explain upcoming assignments Time: 2 min Procedure: Facilitator summarizes key ideas in the slide and talking points. Assignments are also listed on the syllabus and Participants Manual. Talking points: There are 2 journal assignments due at the beginning of session 2 and one paper due the beginning of session 3. Participants are also encouraged to finish reading pages from the 2011 MA Curriculum Frameworks for ELA & Literacy referenced today (p. 5, 83). Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

51 Assignments due by Session 3: Paper
Two-page paper answering questions related to ELLs in your school Use guiding questions as a starting point Interview relevant staff, ELLs Research information Summarize answers Purpose: To explain upcoming assignments Time: 2 min Procedure: Facilitator summarizes key ideas in the slide and talking points. Assignments are also listed on the syllabus and Participant Manual. Talking points: Participants can work in groups to gather research about ELLs in their schools. However, the final two-page paper is to be completed by each individual participant. Paper format: double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman font; due date: date of session 3 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

52 Preparing for Session 2 (Online)
Required Readings: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts curriculum framework for English language arts and literacy, 5 and 83 Trumbull, E. and M. Pacheco Culture, families, communities, and schools. In The Teacher’s Guide to Diversity: Building a Knowledge Base, Volume I: Human Development, Culture, and Cognition, 123–131, 134–136. Providence, RI: Brown University. Moodle login instructions Purpose: To explain upcoming assignments Time: 9 min. Procedure: Facilitator summarizes key ideas in the slide and talking points. Assignments are also listed on the syllabus and Participant Manual. Facilitator offers additional help to participants who want to learn about logging in to Moodle using a computer with internet – if available, or the Moodle login handout. Talking points: Required readings are on Moodle. Login instructions for Moodle appear in the Participant Manual, including MassOne help desk contact information. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education


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