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Course Competencies Module 1 By Mollie DeHart Rolando Garcia Greg Sharp.

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Presentation on theme: "Course Competencies Module 1 By Mollie DeHart Rolando Garcia Greg Sharp."— Presentation transcript:

1 Course Competencies Module 1 By Mollie DeHart Rolando Garcia Greg Sharp

2 Objectives As a result of this workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Explain how MDC course competencies are identified and developed 2. Access SCNS to browse course competencies 3. Explain how course competencies fit into the curriculum development cycle 4. Differentiate between competencies, instructional activities, and instructional objectives 5. Develop stems/goals for course competencies

3 Objectives (cont) 6. Develop Student Performance statements (by statements) for stems/goals 7. Differentiate between cognitive, psychomotor, and affective competencies 8. Use the MDC Course Competency Template – Form 112 to develop competencies at appropriate levels of the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains Form Access and upload competencies to the Course Competency Project SharePoint site

4 Breakdown of Developing Student Outcomes Approval SCNS Exampl e Form 112 Intent of the Course Find an Existing Course Browse Course Profiles Existing Course? SCNS Upload to SharePoint

5 Breakdown of Developing Student Outcomes 1. Statewide Course Numbering System (SCNS): Statewide Course Numbering System (SCNS) 2. Browse existing course profile a. Existing course? b. Intent of the course/complexity c. Find existing competencies/outcomes for similar courses at similar institutions 3. SCNS Example SCNS Example 4. Develop course competency using MDC format (Form 112) 5. Upload to Course Competency SharePoint 6. Approval Process

6 Form 112

7 MDC Academic Approval Process Flowchart for Curriculum/Existing Programs

8 MDC Academic Approval Process Flowchart for Curriculum/New Programs

9 Sample of Course Competency Format using MDC Form 112 The student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of curriculum development by: Composing course proposals within established guidelines Describing components of Learning Outcomes Incorporating assessment of Learning Outcomes in course proposals Utilizing resource materials and tools provided Constructing courses which meet the needs of the student and institution ciesForm.doc ciesForm.doc Stem By Statements

10 By Statements Lead to Achievement of Stems/Goals Stem/Goal By Statements

11 A Course Competency is a… Description of: Competence Intended result of instruction vs. the process of instruction Stated in terms of learner performance

12 Purpose of Competencies? Ensure institutional & statewide consistency Select instructional strategies Provide framework for learning outcomes assessment Define discipline and course learning outcomes in relationship to general education outcomes and competenciesgeneral education outcomes

13 Course Competency Template The student will… Begin with a verb (ing verb) and answer this question: What will the learner know or be able to do upon completion of the course? By: (Performance) Column 1Column 2 How will the learner demonstrate competency or proficiency? Stem/Goal Begin with a general statement of knowledge, skills, and abilities:

14 Course Competency Desired results from instruction Does not precisely clarify what a learner must do or how a learner should perform. (Specific learning outcomes appear in course syllabi)

15 Examples of Stems/Goals The student will demonstrate knowledge of solving systems of linear equations and inequalities by: The student will apply a comprehension of nutritional research by: The student will demonstrate knowledge in completing the accounting cycle by: The student will demonstrate analysis of aesthetics, philosophy, and visual images by:

16 Examples of Competencies Upon successful completion of this course, the student will demonstrate knowledge of the nature and evolution of behavior in animals by: listing the genetic and environmental contributions to behavior. distinguishing between innate and learned behavior. identifying the types of learning behavior. discussing the nature of animal cognition. evaluating the nature and significance of social behavior and sociobiology. The student will demonstrate an understanding of the importance of language in the development of culture by: explaining how language develops. identifying the main type of language families. analyzing how language and culture impact each other.

17 Examples of Competencies (cont) The student will demonstrate an understanding of a visual C++ programming environment by: creating C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. compiling C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. testing C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. debugging C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. executing C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. The student will demonstrate knowledge of geometric formulas by: computing perimeters and areas of plane figures. computing volumes of solids such as prisms, spheres, right circular cylinders, right circular cones.

18 Competency vs. Activity A course competency describes student learning outcomes NOT instructor or student activities. Non-examples: Viewing specific films and slides on various art movements. Attending various lectures.

19 Competency vs. Activity Non-examples: Studying about the Spanish borderlands and Mexican rule over California, Texas, and New Mexico, and knowing about the revolution in Texas, Manifest Destiny, and the war with Mexico. Reading relevant media and magazine articles, viewing selected television programs, reading related books and regularly attending class.

20 Course Competency Performance – What should the learner be able to do upon completion of the course? Ask… What should learners be able to do when demonstrating competency of the task/content?

21 The Performance Component of a Competency (by statement) Select an action verb to describe what learners know or do. Action verbs must be measurable, verifiable or observable.

22 Examples of Performance The student will … by: Explaining how business transactions can be stated in terms of the resulting changes in the three basic elements of the accounting equation. Describing the patterns in the orbits, spins, sizes, and densities of the planets as well as concepts in the origin of the system. Identifying appropriate laboratory data collection procedures, techniques and equipment necessary to perform standard analytical laboratory activities.

23 Levels of Learning/Hierarchies of Course Competencies Simple to Complex Upon successful completion of this course, the student will demonstrate knowledge of the nature and evolution of behavior in animals by: listing the genetic and environmental contributions to behavior. distinguishing between innate and learned behavior. identifying the types of learning behavior. discussing the nature of animal cognition. evaluating the nature and significance of social behavior and sociobiology.

24 Lower to Higher The student will demonstrate an understanding of a visual C++ programming environment by: creating C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. compiling C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. testing C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. debugging C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. executing C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. Lower Higher

25 Intent of Course/Complexity Does the competency meet state guidelines? SCNS Frameworks Is the competency appropriate for the level of instruction?

26 Cognitive Domains & Taxonomies in Course Competencies

27 Taxonomy Systematic grouping of outcomes Share characteristics Sequential and cumulative order

28 3 Learning Domains Cognitive - Development of intellectual abilities and skills Psychomotor - Manipulative or motor skills Affective - Changes in interests, attitudes, values and emotional adjustments

29 Learning Domains 3 Types of Learning: Psychomotor Manual or Physical Skills (Skills) How we do Affective Growth in feelings or emotional areas (Attitude) How we feel Cognitive Mental Skills (Knowledge) What we know

30 Cognitive Domain Bloom (Revised) Includes competencies which deal with remembering information and developing intellectual abilities

31 Blooms Taxonomy of Cognitive Domain (Revised) Creating Evaluating Analyzing Applying Understanding Remembering Taxonomy Levels

32 Cognitive Domain LevelsSample Verbs Remembering: can the student recall or remember the information? Define, duplicate, list, memorize, recall, repeat, reproduce, state Understanding: can student explain ideas or concepts? Classify, describe, discuss, explain, identify, locate, recognize, report, select, translate, paraphrase Applying: can the student use the information in a new way? Choose, demonstrate, dramatize, employ, illustrate, interpret, operate, schedule, sketch, solve, use, write Analyzing: can the student interpret information? Appraise, compare, contrast, criticize, differentiate, discriminate, distinguish, examine, question, test Evaluating: can the student justify a stand or decision? Appraise, argue, defend, judge, select, support, value, evaluate Creating: can the student create a new product or point of view? Assemble, construct, create, design, develop, formulate, write Additional Examples: Michael Pohl's Website about Bloom's TaxonomyMichael Pohl's Website about Bloom's Taxonomy Cognitive Domain

33 Sample Verbs For Cognitive Domain (Bloom –Revised) RememberUnderstandApplyAnalyzeEvaluateCreative chooseclassifyapplyanalyzeappraisechoose describedefendchoosecategorizejudgecombine definedemonstratedramatizeclassifycriticizecompose identifydistinguishexplaincomparedefendconstruct labelexplaingeneralizedifferentiatecomparecreate listexpressjudgedistinguishdesign locateextendorganizeidentifydevelop matchgive examplepaintinferdo memorizeillustratepreparepoint outformulate nameindicateproduceselecthypothesize omitinterrelateselectsubdivideinvent reciteinterpretshowsurveymake recognizeinfersketchmake up selectjudgesolveoriginate statematchuseorganize

34 Sample Verbs For Cognitive Domain (Bloom –Revised) RememberUnderstandApplyAnalyzeEvaluateCreative paraphraseplan representproduce restaterole play rewitetell select show summarize tell translate

35 Additional Links to Blooms Taxonomy oom/blooms.htm oom/blooms.htm edagogy/bloom.htm edagogy/bloom.htm ng/bloom.htm ng/bloom.htm evisedTaxonomy_KeyWords.pdf#search=%2 2blooms%20taxonomy%20revised%22 evisedTaxonomy_KeyWords.pdf#search=%2 2blooms%20taxonomy%20revised%22 ars/toolbox/blooms/revisedbloomsverbs.doc ars/toolbox/blooms/revisedbloomsverbs.doc

36 Taxonomy of Psychomotor Domain Naturalization Articulation Precision Manipulation Imitation Taxonomy Levels

37 IMITATION Observes skills and attempts to report it MANIPULATION Performs skills by instruction rather than observation PRECISION Reproduces a skill with accuracy, proportion and exactness; usually performed independently of original sources ARTICULATION Combines more than one skill in sequence with harmony and consistency NATURALIZATION Completes one or more skills with ease; requires limited physical or mental exertions PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN

38 Sample Verbs For Psychomotor Domain IMITATIONMANIPULATIONPRECISIONARTICULATION adjustarrangeadministerconduct applycodebookdocument assemblecontrolclipencircle builddesignderivegraph calibratedismantledrawpull changedisplayfocuspush cleandrillhandleregulate combineencapsulateidentifysculpt composeexpandintroduceset computefastenlocatesketch connectfixmanipulateslide constructfollowmendstart correctframemixstir creategraphmodifytransfer debuggrindnailuse displayhammerpaintvend insertheatpreservevocalize installinputpointweigh mapinterfacesandwork

39 Sample Verbs For Psychomotor Domain IMITATIONMANIPULATIONPRECISIONARTICULATION operatelooptransport probemaintain repairorganize shadepunch transformsupport troubleshootswitch transmit work

40 Kratwohls Taxonomy of Affective Domain Characterizing Organizing Valuing Responding Receiving Taxonomy Levels

41 RECEIVING Listening passively; Attending to EXAMPLES: Ask Name RESPONDING Complies to given expectation; shows interest EXAMPLES: Answer Recite VALUING Display behavior consistent with single belief or attitude; unforced compliance EXAMPLES: Complete Explain Justify ORGANIZING Committed to a set of values as displayed by behavior EXAMPLES: Integrate Adhere CHARACTERIZING Total behavior is consistent with internalized values EXAMPLES: Qualify Modify Perform AFFECTIVE DOMAIN

42 Sample Verbs For Affective Domains RECEIVINGRESPONDINGVALUINGORGANIZATIONVALUE COMPLEX askanswercompleteadhereact chooseassistdescribealterdiscriminate describecomplydifferentiatearrangedisplay followconformexplaincombineinfluence givediscussformcomparelisten holdgreetinitiatecompletemodify identifyhelpinvitedefendperform locatelabeljoinexplainpropose nameperformjustifyidentifyqualify point topracticeproposeintegratequestion selectpresentreadmodifyrevise setreadreportorderserve erectreciteselectorganizesolve reportsharesynthesizeuse selectstudyverify tellwork write

43 Course Competency Project https://spsd.mdc.edu/cwg/ap/cc/default.as px https://spsd.mdc.edu/cwg/ap/cc/default.as px Competancies r posted the on world wide web. So please heck you spelling punctuation n grammr.

44 Course Competency Checklist Accessed SCNS to browse existing course descriptions and competencies Identified general statements of knowledge, skills, and abilities Developed student performance by statements which are: Measurable, verifiable, or observable Stated at the appropriate cognitive, psychomotor or affective domain level

45 Course Competency Checklist Verified that the competencies are appropriate for the level of instruction Verified that the competencies meet state guidelines Uploaded MDC form 112 to the Course Competency Project SharePoint site

46 Assessment Developing Course Competencies Activity Developing Course Competencies Analysis


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