Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Course Competencies Module 1

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Course Competencies Module 1"— Presentation transcript:

1 Course Competencies Module 1
By Mollie DeHart Rolando Garcia Greg Sharp

2 Objectives As a result of this workshop, participants will be able to:
Explain how MDC course competencies are identified and developed Access SCNS to browse course competencies Explain how course competencies fit into the curriculum development cycle Differentiate between competencies, instructional activities, and instructional objectives Develop stems/goals for course competencies Add SCNS Objective

3 Objectives (cont) Develop “Student Performance” statements (“by” statements) for stems/goals Differentiate between cognitive, psychomotor, and affective competencies Use the MDC Course Competency Template – Form 112 to develop competencies at appropriate levels of the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains Access and upload competencies to the Course Competency Project SharePoint site

4 Breakdown of Developing Student Outcomes
SCNS Existing Course? Browse Course Profiles Find an Existing Course Intent of the Course SCNS Example Form 112 Approval Add all breakdown components Upload to SharePoint

5 Breakdown of Developing Student Outcomes
Statewide Course Numbering System (SCNS): Browse existing course profile Existing course? Intent of the course/complexity Find existing competencies/outcomes for similar courses at similar institutions SCNS Example Develop course competency using MDC format (Form 112) Upload to Course Competency SharePoint Approval Process Mention that a login is not necessary. All menu options are on the left navigation pane. Users can browse courses, institutions, etc.

6 Form 112

7 MDC Academic Approval Process Flowchart for Curriculum/Existing Programs

8 MDC Academic Approval Process Flowchart for Curriculum/New Programs

9 Sample of Course Competency Format using MDC Form 112
The student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of curriculum development by: Composing course proposals within established guidelines Describing components of Learning Outcomes Incorporating assessment of Learning Outcomes in course proposals Utilizing resource materials and tools provided Constructing courses which meet the needs of the student and institution Stem “By” Statements Take

10 “By” Statements Lead to Achievement of Stems/Goals
Stem/Goal “By” Statements “By” Statements

11 A Course Competency is a…
Description of: Competence Intended result of instruction vs. the process of instruction Stated in terms of learner performance

12 Purpose of Competencies?
Ensure institutional & statewide consistency Select instructional strategies Provide framework for learning outcomes assessment Define discipline and course learning outcomes in relationship to general education outcomes and competencies

13 Course Competency Template
Column 1 Column 2 Stem/Goal “By”: (Performance) Begin with a general statement of knowledge, skills, and abilities: Begin with a verb (“ing” verb) and answer this question: What will the learner know or be able to do upon completion of the course? The student will… How will the learner demonstrate competency or proficiency?

14 Course Competency Desired results from instruction
Does not precisely clarify what a learner must do or how a learner should perform. (Specific learning outcomes appear in course syllabi)

15 Examples of Stems/Goals
The student will demonstrate knowledge of solving systems of linear equations and inequalities by: The student will apply a comprehension of nutritional research by: The student will demonstrate knowledge in completing the accounting cycle by: The student will demonstrate analysis of aesthetics, philosophy, and visual images by:

16 Examples of Competencies
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will demonstrate knowledge of the nature and evolution of behavior in animals by: listing the genetic and environmental contributions to behavior. distinguishing between innate and learned behavior. identifying the types of learning behavior. discussing the nature of animal cognition. evaluating the nature and significance of social behavior and sociobiology. The student will demonstrate an understanding of the importance of language in the development of culture by: explaining how language develops. identifying the main type of language families. analyzing how language and culture impact each other.

17 Examples of Competencies (cont)
The student will demonstrate an understanding of a visual C++ programming environment by: creating C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. compiling C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. testing C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. debugging C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. executing C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. The student will demonstrate knowledge of geometric formulas by: computing perimeters and areas of plane figures. computing volumes of solids such as prisms, spheres, right circular cylinders, right circular cones.

18 Competency vs. Activity
A course competency describes student learning outcomes NOT instructor or student activities. Non-examples: “Viewing specific films and slides on various art movements.” “Attending various lectures.” Change recognize competency.

19 Competency vs. Activity
Non-examples: “Studying about the Spanish borderlands and Mexican rule over California, Texas, and New Mexico, and knowing about the revolution in Texas, Manifest Destiny, and the war with Mexico.” “Reading relevant media and magazine articles, viewing selected television programs, reading related books and regularly attending class.”

20 Course Competency Performance –
What should the learner be able to do upon completion of the course? Ask… “What should learners be able to do when demonstrating competency of the task/content?”

21 The Performance Component of a Competency (“by” statement)
Select an action verb to describe what learners know or do. Action verbs must be measurable, verifiable or observable.

22 Examples of Performance
The student will … by: “Explaining how business transactions can be stated in terms of the resulting changes in the three basic elements of the accounting equation.” “Describing the patterns in the orbits, spins, sizes, and densities of the planets as well as concepts in the origin of the system.” “Identifying appropriate laboratory data collection procedures, techniques and equipment necessary to perform standard analytical laboratory activities.”

23 Levels of Learning/Hierarchies of Course Competencies
Simple to Complex Upon successful completion of this course, the student will demonstrate knowledge of the nature and evolution of behavior in animals by: listing the genetic and environmental contributions to behavior. distinguishing between innate and learned behavior. identifying the types of learning behavior. discussing the nature of animal cognition. evaluating the nature and significance of social behavior and sociobiology.

24 Lower to Higher Higher Lower
The student will demonstrate an understanding of a visual C++ programming environment by: creating C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. compiling C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. testing C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. debugging C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE. executing C++ programs and projects in a visual C++ IDE.

25 Intent of Course/Complexity
Does the competency meet state guidelines? SCNS Frameworks Is the competency appropriate for the level of instruction?

26 Cognitive Domains & Taxonomies in Course Competencies

27 Taxonomy Systematic grouping of outcomes Share characteristics
Sequential and cumulative order Greg to expand on the information

28 3 Learning Domains Cognitive - Development of intellectual abilities and skills Psychomotor - Manipulative or motor skills Affective - Changes in interests, attitudes, values and emotional adjustments

29 Learning Domains http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/bloom.html
3 Types of Learning: Psychomotor Manual or Physical Skills (Skills) How we “do” Affective Growth in feelings or emotional areas (Attitude) How we “feel” Cognitive Mental Skills (Knowledge) What we know

30 Cognitive Domain Bloom (Revised)
Includes competencies which deal with remembering information and developing intellectual abilities

31 Bloom’s Taxonomy of Cognitive Domain (Revised)
Taxonomy Levels Creating Evaluating Analyzing Applying Understanding Remembering

32 Cognitive Domain Levels
Sample Verbs Remembering: can the student recall or remember the information? Define, duplicate, list, memorize, recall, repeat, reproduce, state Understanding: can student explain ideas or concepts? Classify, describe, discuss, explain, identify, locate, recognize, report, select, translate, paraphrase Applying: can the student use the information in a new way? Choose, demonstrate, dramatize, employ, illustrate, interpret, operate, schedule, sketch, solve, use, write Analyzing: can the student interpret information? Appraise, compare, contrast, criticize, differentiate, discriminate, distinguish, examine, question, test Evaluating: can the student justify a stand or decision? Appraise, argue, defend, judge, select, support, value, evaluate Creating: can the student create a new product or point of view? Assemble, construct, create, design, develop, formulate, write Additional Examples: Michael Pohl's Website about Bloom's Taxonomy

33 Sample Verbs For Cognitive Domain (Bloom –Revised)
Remember Understand Apply Analyze Evaluate Creative choose classify apply analyze appraise describe defend categorize judge combine define demonstrate dramatize criticize compose identify distinguish explain compare construct label generalize differentiate create list express design locate extend organize develop match give example paint infer do memorize illustrate prepare point out formulate name indicate produce select hypothesize omit interrelate subdivide invent recite interpret show survey make recognize sketch make up solve originate state use

34 Sample Verbs For Cognitive Domain (Bloom –Revised)
Remember Understand Apply Analyze Evaluate Creative paraphrase plan represent produce restate role play rewite tell select show summarize translate

35 Additional Links to Bloom’s Taxonomy

36 Taxonomy of Psychomotor Domain
Taxonomy Levels Naturalization Articulation Precision Manipulation Imitation

37 PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN NATURALIZATION
IMITATION Observes skills and attempts to report it MANIPULATION Performs skills by instruction rather than observation PRECISION Reproduces a skill with accuracy, proportion and exactness; usually performed independently of original sources ARTICULATION Combines more than one skill in sequence with harmony and consistency NATURALIZATION Completes one or more skills with ease; requires limited physical or mental exertions PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN

38 Sample Verbs For Psychomotor Domain
IMITATION MANIPULATION PRECISION ARTICULATION adjust arrange administer conduct apply code book document assemble control clip encircle build design derive graph calibrate dismantle draw pull change display focus push clean drill handle regulate combine encapsulate identify sculpt compose expand introduce set compute fasten locate sketch connect fix manipulate slide construct follow mend start correct frame mix stir create modify transfer debug grind nail use hammer paint vend insert heat preserve vocalize install input point weigh map interface sand work

39 Sample Verbs For Psychomotor Domain
IMITATION MANIPULATION PRECISION ARTICULATION operate loop transport probe maintain repair organize shade punch transform support troubleshoot switch transmit work

40 Kratwohl’s Taxonomy of Affective Domain
Taxonomy Levels Characterizing Organizing Valuing Responding Receiving

41 AFFECTIVE DOMAIN CHARACTERIZING
RECEIVING Listening passively; Attending to EXAMPLES: Ask Name RESPONDING Complies to given expectation; shows interest Answer Recite VALUING Display behavior consistent with single belief or attitude; unforced compliance Complete Explain Justify ORGANIZING Committed to a set of values as displayed by behavior Integrate Adhere CHARACTERIZING Total behavior is consistent with internalized values Qualify Modify Perform AFFECTIVE DOMAIN

42 Sample Verbs For Affective Domains
RECEIVING RESPONDING VALUING ORGANIZATION VALUE COMPLEX ask answer complete adhere act choose assist describe alter discriminate comply differentiate arrange display follow conform explain combine influence give discuss form compare listen hold greet initiate modify identify help invite defend perform locate label join propose name justify qualify point to practice integrate question select present read revise set report order serve erect recite organize solve share synthesize use study verify tell work write Mention!!! Sample grinds – Columns do not relate one to another. They are separate entities.

43 Course Competency Project
https://spsd.mdc.edu/cwg/ap/cc/default.aspx Competancies r posted the on world wide web. So please heck you spelling punctuation n grammr.

44 Course Competency Checklist
Accessed SCNS to browse existing course descriptions and competencies Identified general statements of knowledge, skills, and abilities Developed student performance by statements which are: Measurable, verifiable, or observable Stated at the appropriate cognitive, psychomotor or affective domain level

45 Course Competency Checklist
Verified that the competencies are appropriate for the level of instruction Verified that the competencies meet state guidelines Uploaded MDC form 112 to the Course Competency Project SharePoint site

46 Assessment Developing Course Competencies Activity
Developing Course Competencies Analysis


Download ppt "Course Competencies Module 1"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google