Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Moscow 2013 Why teaching matters and how to.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Moscow 2013 Why teaching matters and how to."— Presentation transcript:

1 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Moscow 2013 Why teaching matters and how to improve it Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London

2 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London 1 Starting points

3 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Policy: floors and ceilings

4 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London 4 Dimensions of high performance workplaces Raising the floor, lowering the ceiling Regulation and direction Laissez-faire, unregulated autonomy Lowering the floor, not raising the ceiling The task: raising the floor and raising the ceiling further Some issues of floors and ceilings Raising the ceiling, not moving the floor Autonomy without challenge

5 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Equity HighLow Excellence High System improvement for all Pockets of excellence; high achievement for a favoured minority Low Low challenge; wasted talent; stagnant systems System failure; intolerable inefficiency and high dropout rates The excellence-equity challenge?

6 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Proposals on Issues of Immediate Relevance for the Socioeconomic Strategy of Russia Until the Year 2020, Report of Expert Team #8, Medium-term Vision of Progress in Education and Socialization Russia: 2020 Vision Many pupils do not achieve functional literacy Large gap between best and worst student cohorts Poor social competence amongst school leavers Deteriorating teacher quality Curriculum reforms not working High theoretical competence of teachers Higher levels of pupil competence than many countries Accessible secondary education Secondary education reforms underway

7 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London English schools in 1987 No monitoring of school performance A very long tail of under- achievement No core curriculum Primary curriculum narrow and undemanding Pockets of excellence but too much poor practice Tradition of curriculum reform through projects Excellent performance at the upper end of the attainment range Universal primary and secondary education

8 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Four phases of reform in England Decentralised localism ( ) Little central direction; poor monitoring of performance; local variability Directed marketisation ( ) Focus on common standards; direction of performance measures; market forces Centralised professionalism ( ) Central prescription (highest ), focus on common standards of performance Radical marketisation (2010-) Radical decentralisation within a common standards structure

9 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London 1 Education and the world

10 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London 2020 Vision Social and academic success for every child Contribute to Russias innovation- based economy Respond to cultural, social and technical change Goals Bold, brave, right goals Achievement Economic ImpactSocial purpose

11 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Achievement matters

12 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Rates of return to an additional year of schooling, by region Barro, R., and Lee, J-W, 1993, International Comparisons of Educational Attainment, Journal of Monetary Economics, 32, 3,

13 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London A changing economy: US job skill demand

14 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London 14 3 Why teaching matters

15 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London The best school systems are those that have the best teachers. Countries and regions such as Finland, Singapore, South Korea, Ontario and others recruit teachers from the top echelon of graduates each year, they pay them well and they create and maintain a culture of inclusion and quality throughout teachers careers that imbues the whole school system. McKinsey 2008 The challenge for teaching: schools and systems

16 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Schools and teachers Within schools Between schools

17 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London 17 3 Five ways to improve teaching

18 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Policy 1: Recruit and deploy the best in teaching Policy 2: Improve the teachers you already have Policy 3: Give schools simple guidance Policy 4: Focus on 21 st century teaching Policy 5: Making change happen

19 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London 4 Making a real difference

20 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Policy 1: Recruit and deploy the best people Policy 1: Recruit and deploy the best people Policy 3: Give schools simple guidance Policy 3: Give schools simple guidance Policy 2: Improve the teachers you already have Policy 2: Improve the teachers you already have Policy 4: Define the core priorities for teaching Policy 4: Define the core priorities for teaching TEACHERS SCHOOLS Five policies to make a difference SYSTEM Policy 5: Set out a clear vision and maintain a focus on core policies

21 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Worldwide Reform Initiatives emphasize expectations for higher-order skills along with rich content that represents core concepts and modes of inquiry. teach less, learn more: Focus the curriculum on standards that are fewer, higher, and deeper to allow more time to apply ideas in depth. increase emphasis on learning involving research, analysis, application, self- assessment, and production. develop assessments of, as, and for learning. arm teachers with greater capacity to use a wide range of pedagogic and assessment tools to analyze and support learning.

22 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London for example.... We believe that each generation of young people in Australia should finish school with more prospects of success than the generation before. We know that improving educational attainment for all young people is central to our nations social and economic prosperity and will position our young people to live satisfying, productive and responsible lives. National Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians (2009)

23 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London for example.... Carl bikes home from school at four oclock. It takes about a quarter of an hour. In the evening, hes going back to school because the class is having a party. The party starts at six oclock. Before the class party starts, Carl has to eat dinner. When he comes home, his grandmother calls, who is also his neighbour. She wants him to bring in her post before he bikes over to the class party. She also wants him to take her dog for a walk, then to come in and have a chat. What does Carl have time to do before the party begins? Write and describe below how you have reasoned. Grade 4 (aged 10) assessment task, Sweden

24 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Understand the levers for reform Curriculum, assessment, accountability, funding, early years, elementary, primary, secondary..... If performance is poor, mandate tightly If performance is improving, identify one of two priorities and stick to them If performance is inconsistent, find good practice and disseminate it If performance is good, aim for self improvement No education system can cope with too much change

25 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Understand the levers for reform What can be done From the centreFrom researchIn schools A self-improving system Getting the balance right

26 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Teacher Education in England Common national standards Clear definition of what teachers must know, understand and be able to do Practice based clinical training Strong focus on practice as a key element in learning to teach Involving schools Schools collaborating in the design, delivery and assessment of training Defining the research base for effective practices Building research on effective teaching into training

27 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Clarify your message Improve teacher recruitment Mobilise support Get schools focused on quality In one year In 5 years What can you achieve…. In 10 years Identify the best practices and use them to drive wider change

28 Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Moscow 2013 Why teaching matters and how to improve it Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London


Download ppt "Professor Chris Husbands. Director, Institute of Education, University of London Moscow 2013 Why teaching matters and how to."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google