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Professional Food Manager Certification Version 4.0 - © NSF International, 2007 Professional Food Manager Certification Version 4.0 - © NSF International,

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Presentation on theme: "Professional Food Manager Certification Version 4.0 - © NSF International, 2007 Professional Food Manager Certification Version 4.0 - © NSF International,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2006 Food Facilities 6

2 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities Core Objectives… Understand the factors involved in designing a food establishment. Know what types of materials are approved for floors, walls and ceilings. Know what is required for a handwashing station. Understand good waste management practices.

3 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Core Objectives (contd)… Know the most common types of pests that threaten food safety in food establishments. Understand the principles of integrated pest management. Identify methods and devices that prevent backflow. Understand imminent health hazards and what to do when one occurs. Chapter 6 – Food Facilities

4 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities 6.1 Facility Layout, Design, and Construction Important items to consider: Types of food served or sold. The flow of food through the facility. Refrigeration and cooking requirements. Ventilation requirements. Dry food storage requirements.

5 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities 6.1 Facility Layout, Design, and Construction (contd) Important items to consider (contd): Location of handwashing sink. Storage for chemicals. Lighting requirements. Location of employee dressing rooms and break areas.

6 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities Floors, Walls, and Ceilings Cleanability is the most important factor when choosing materials for walls or flooring. Other important factors include durability, safety, comfort and cost. Ceilings in all food and warewashing areas must be nonporous and easily cleanable. Exposed overhead pipes, rafters, and joists are not permitted in any food preparation or warewashing areas.

7 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities Lighting – Foot Candle Unit of Light Measurement Good lighting is essential for both sanitation and safety. The amount of lighting in an area depends on the type of work being done. The FDA Model Food Code gives several recommendations for lighting intensity. 50 foot candles – Food Preparation or working with utensils or equipment such as knives, slicers, grinders or saws where employee safety is a factor. 20 foot candles – Reach-in refrigerator, dishwashing, toilet rooms, handwashing, buffets, salad bars, wait station. 10 foot candles – Walk-in refrigerator and freezer, dry storage room, cleaning dining rooms.

8 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities 6.2 Handwashing Stations and Hand Sinks The FDA Food Establishment Plan Review Guide recommends that all food preparation and warewashing areas have a handwashing sink located within 25 feet. The FDA Model Food Code requires handwashing sinks in: Food preparation, food dispensing and warewashing areas, and In, or immediately adjacent, to toilet rooms.

9 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities 6.2 Handwashing Stations and Hand Sinks (contd) Handwashing stations must include: Water of at least 100°F through a mixing valve or combination faucet. A self-closing or metering faucet shall provide at least a 15 second flow without reactivating. Soap. An acceptable method for drying hands (disposable towel, continual towel system or heated-air hand drying device). A waste receptacle, step on with cover. Signage directing food handlers must wash hands. Food Handlers Must Wash Hands

10 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities 6.3 Chemicals and Storage Chemical storage areas must be separate from all food storage and preparation areas. Manufacturers often recommend cool, dry storage. Chemicals must be 6 inches off the floor, and clearly labeled.

11 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities 6.4 Waste Management Practices Garbage containers must be: Durable. Easily cleanable. Nonabsorbent. Waterproof. Leak proof. Rodent and insect resistant. Garbage/refuse dumpster must be on nonabsorbent base – concrete, asphalt; and sloped to drain.

12 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities 6.5 Pests and Pest Control Pest infestations must be prevented because insects and rodents can: Carry pathogenic microorganisms. Contaminate food. Make people ill. The types of pests or vermin of greatest concern to food managers are flies, cockroaches, rats, and mice.

13 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities Flies Three types of flies that commonly invade food establishments are: House flies. Blow flies. Fruit Flies.

14 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities Cockroaches Cockroaches avoid well-lit areas and tend to hide in dark, warm, moist environments. They may nest inside hollow spaces in walls, ceilings and food equipment. The most common cockroach found in food establishments in the U.S. is the German cockroach.

15 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities Rodents Rodents generally only come out at night and follow the same paths, staying close to walls or sides of buildings. They cause damage by gnawing walls, floors, and into containers of food. The most common types found throughout the U.S. include the house mouse, roof rat and Norway rat.

16 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities Integrated Pest Management The most important integrated pest management principles are: Preventing access into the facility. Storing foods properly and keeping the facility clean and in good repair preventing vermin access to food, water or places to hide. Using a licensed pest control operator to exterminate any pests that find their way inside.

17 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities Integrated Pest Management (contd) Only a trained and licensed pest control operator should apply pesticides.

18 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities 6.6 Potable and Non-potable Water Water used in food preparation, cleaning and sanitizing of equipment and handwashing must be potable. The use of non-potable water in a food establishment is very rare. Non-potable water is only to be used in air-conditioning units, fire suppression systems and outdoor irrigation.

19 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities 6.7 Cross Connections and Backflow Prevention Cross connection occurs when a potable water supply line and a non-potable water source are directly connected. Backflow occurs when non-potable water flows back into a potable water supply. Most effective backflow prevention methods is an air gap. Keep grease traps clear.

20 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities Cross Connection Process: a) Direct connection between the water supply and a drain, sewer, or container of liquid. b) Backflow – reverse flow of contaminated water or other liquid through the direct connection to the water supply due to a sudden change in water pressure Cross Connection Link – Backflow

21 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities Cross Connection and Backflow Prevention (contd) Vacuum Breakers – attached to potable water supply. Air Gap – above and below sinks, length of air gap space is 2x the width of the drain pipe. Two Ways to prevent Backflow:

22 Professional Food Manager Certification Version © NSF International, 2007 Chapter 6 – Food Facilities 6.8 Imminent Health Hazards An imminent health hazard poses an immediate and severe risk to proper sanitation and to human health. Regulatory agency could order your facility to close due to: Raw sewage backup into facility or water supply. Significant lack of refrigeration. Emergency – fire, flood, storm damage. Significant infestation of insects or rodents. Long interruption of electrical or water service. Clear evidence of food borne illness outbreak related to the facility.


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