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Chapter: ©2009 Worth Publishers >> Krugman/Wells First Principles 1 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter: ©2009 Worth Publishers >> Krugman/Wells First Principles 1 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING."— Presentation transcript:

1 chapter: ©2009 Worth Publishers >> Krugman/Wells First Principles 1 CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING

2 Check Your Understanding 1-1 Question 1 Explain how each of the following situations illustrates one of the four principles of individual choice.

3 1a) You are on your third trip to a restaurants all-you-can-eat dessert buffet and are feeling very full. Although it would cost you no additional money, you forgo another slice of coconut cream pie but have a slice of chocolate cake. 1.resources are scarce 2.opportunity cost 3.trade-off in marginal analysis 4.people exploit opportunities to make themselves better off

4 1b) Even if there were more resources in the world there would still be scarcity. 1.resources are scarce 2.opportunity cost 3.trade-off in marginal analysis 4.people exploit opportunities to make themselves better off

5 1c) Different teaching assistants teach several Economics 101 tutorials. Those taught by the teaching assistants with the best reputations fill up quickly, with spaces left unfilled in the ones taught by assistants with poor reputations. 1.resources are scarce 2.opportunity cost 3.trade-off in marginal analysis 4.people exploit opportunities to make themselves better off

6 1d) To decide how many hours per week to exercise, you compare the health benefits of one more hour of exercise to the effect on your grades of one less hour spent studying. 1.resources are scarce 2.opportunity cost 3.trade-off in marginal analysis 4.people exploit opportunities to make themselves better off

7 Check Your Understanding 1-1 Question 2 You make $45,000 per year at your current job with Whiz Kids Consultants. You are considering a job offer from Brainiacs, Inc., which will pay you $50,000 per year.

8 2a) The increased time spent commuting to your new job is an opportunity cost of accepting the new job. 1.True 2.False

9 2b) The $45,000 salary from your old job is an opportunity cost of accepting the new job. 1.True 2.False

10 2c) The more spacious office at your new job is an opportunity cost of accepting the new job. 1.True 2.False

11 Check Your Understanding 1-2 Question 1 Directions: Which of the five principles of interaction is illustrated in the situations described?

12 1a) Using the college Web site, any student who wants to sell a used textbook for at least $30 is able to sell it to another who is willing to pay $30. 1.gains from trade 2.Markets move toward equilibrium. 3.Resources should be used as efficiently as possible to achieve societys goal. 4.Markets usually lead to efficiency. 5.When markets dont achieve efficiency, government intervention can improve societys welfare.

13 1b) At a college tutoring co-op, students can arrange to provide tutoring in subjects they are good in (like economics) in return for receiving tutoring in subjects they are poor in (like philosophy). 1.gains from trade 2.Markets move toward equilibrium. 3.Resources should be used as efficiently as possible to achieve societys goal. 4.Markets usually lead to efficiency 5.When markets dont achieve efficiency, government intervention can improve societys welfare.

14 1c) The local municipality imposes a law that requires bars and nightclubs near residential areas to keep their noise levels below a certain threshold. 1.gains from trade 2.Markets move toward equilibrium. 3.Resources should be used as efficiently as possible to achieve societys goal. 4.Markets usually lead to efficiency. 5.When markets dont achieve efficiency, government intervention can improve societys welfare.

15 1d) To provide better care for low-income patients, the local municipality has decided to close some underutilized neighborhood clinics and shift funds to the main hospital. 1.gains from trade 2.Markets move toward equilibrium. 3.Resources should be used as efficiently as possible to achieve societys goals. 4.Markets usually lead to efficiency. 5.When markets dont achieve efficiency, government intervention can improve societys welfare.

16 1e) On the college Web site, books of a given title with approximately the same level of wear and tear sell for about the same price. 1.gains from trade 2.Markets move toward equilibrium. 3.Resources should be used as efficiently as possible to achieve societys goals. 4.Markets usually lead to efficiency. 5.When markets dont achieve efficiency, government intervention can improve societys welfare.

17 Check Your Understanding 1-2 Question 2 Which of the following describes an equilibrium situation? Which does not?

18 2a) The restaurants across the street from the university dining hall serve better-tasting and cheaper meals than those served at the university dining hall. The vast majority of students continue to eat at the dining hall. 1.True 2.False

19 2b) You currently take the subway to work. Although taking the bus is cheaper, the ride takes longer. So you are willing to pay the higher subway fare in order to save time. 1.True 2.False

20 Check Your Understanding 1-3 Question 1 Explain how each of the following examples illustrates one of the three principles of economy-wide interactions.

21 1a) The White House urged Congress to pass major tax cuts in the spring of 2001, when it became clear that the U.S. economy was experiencing a slump. 1.One persons spending is another persons income. 2.Overall spending doesnt match the economys productive capacity. 3.Government policies can change spending.

22 1b) Oil companies are investing heavily in projects that will extract oil from the oil sands of Canada. In Edmonton, Alberta, near the projects, restaurants and other consumer businesses are booming. 1.One persons spending is another persons income. 2.Overall spending doesnt match the economys productive capacity. 3.Government policies can change spending.

23 1c) In the mid-2000s, Spain, which was experiencing a big housing boom, also had the highest inflation rate in Europe. 1.One persons spending is another persons income. 2.Overall spending doesnt match the economys productive capacity. 3.Government policies can change spending.


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