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Partnerships, Alliances, and Coordination Techniques Communication Strategies February 2008 Facilitated By: The National Child Care Information and Technical.

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Presentation on theme: "Partnerships, Alliances, and Coordination Techniques Communication Strategies February 2008 Facilitated By: The National Child Care Information and Technical."— Presentation transcript:

1 Partnerships, Alliances, and Coordination Techniques Communication Strategies February 2008 Facilitated By: The National Child Care Information and Technical Assistance Center (NCCIC) NCCIC Is a Service of the Child Care Bureau

2 Presenter

3 Todays Agenda

4 Session Objectives Participants will be able to… 1.Recognize their own communication styles as well as those of others; 2.Describe the key concepts of a communication plan for effective partnerships; and 3.Implement problem-solving measures when conflicts arise within a partnership

5 PACT PACT is an initiative of NCCIC, a service of the Child Care Bureau, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services PACT gives State, Territory, and Tribal policymakersparticularly Child Care and Development Fund Administrators and their partnersthe resources they need to build more comprehensive and collaborative early care and school-age programs for serving children and families

6 PACT Materials PACT Collaborative Leadership Strategies: A Guide for Child Care Administrators and Their Partners Web-based guide contains an introduction and six training modules: –Fundamentals of Collaborative Leadership –Creating, Implementing, and Sustaining Partnerships –Communication Strategies –Management Strategies for Successful Partnerships –Financing –Building Capacity for Evaluating Partnerships

7 Key Concepts Communication is the process of exchanging information through speech, signals, or writing Communication involves listening, questioning, understanding, and responding to what is being expressed by others Effective communication is central to the success of creating, implementing, and sustaining partnerships over time

8 Communication Pyramid Cooperation Coordination Collaboration Communication Note: Different authors use the terms cooperation and coordination interchangeably. This diagram follows the work of Sharon Lynn Kagan in defining the least intense level as cooperation as cited in Winer and Ray (2000). Used with permission.

9 Modes of Communication Listening Writing Speaking Reading

10 Are You an Active Listener? Has anyone ever told you that you werent listening? Have you ever asked others to repeat themselves, because your mind had wandered? Have you ever been embarrassed because you gave the wrong answer to a question when you werent listening? Have you ever taken a mental leave of absence while someone was speaking? Has anyone ever asked you whether youre paying attention?

11 Active Listening Techniques Stop talking Give the speaker your conscious attention Exercise patience Be empathetic Ask clarifying questions Paraphrase Make notes

12 Communication Styles Controller/Director Promoter/SocializerSupporter/Relater Analyzer/Thinker Source: Jourdain, K. (February 2004). Communication styles and conflict. Approaching change, Vol. 4, No. 6. Chrysalis Performance Strategies, Inc. www.teamchrysalis.com/AC/V4/AC46_Communication_Styles.htm

13 Plan to Communicate Design a communication system that is responsive to the different kinds of agencies and people in your partnership Establish informal and formal communication links Create a communication plan that reflects what your partners want and need to know, and how they want to receive information Hold partners accountable for communications Sources: Winer, M., & Ray, K., (2000). Collaboration handbook, Creating, sustaining and enjoying the journey. St. Paul, MN: Fieldstone Alliance; and Ray, K., (2002). The nimble collaboration – Fine-tuning your collaboration for lasting success. St. Paul, MN: Fieldstone Alliance.

14 Communication Tools Determine your premise Consider your promise State your mission Sources: Winer, M., & Ray, K., (2000). Collaboration handbook, Creating, sustaining and enjoying the journey. St. Paul, MN: Fieldstone Alliance; and Ray, K., (2002). The nimble collaboration – Fine-tuning your collaboration for lasting success. St. Paul, MN: Fieldstone Alliance.

15 Communication Tools (con.) Confirm your vision Specify desired results Clarify roles Create your work plan Sources: Winer, M., & Ray, K., (2000). Collaboration handbook, Creating, sustaining and enjoying the journey. St. Paul, MN: Fieldstone Alliance; and Ray, K., (2002). The nimble collaboration – Fine-tuning your collaboration for lasting success. St. Paul, MN: Fieldstone Alliance.

16 Expect Conflict Conflict is inevitable Early indicators of conflict can be recognized Conflict involves people resolving issues that are important to them Conflict causes authentic communication Conflict builds cooperation among people through learning more about each other Conflict helps people develop understanding and skills Although inevitable, conflict can be minimized, diverted, and/or resolved Source: Winer, M., & Ray, K., (2000). Collaboration handbook, Creating, sustaining and enjoying the journey. St. Paul, MN: Fieldstone Alliance.

17 Create a Conflict Resolution Process Determine which issues must be resolved in order for the partners to do their work. Stay focused. Decide who will facilitate the process for resolving the conflict Define the conflict separate from the concepts of right and wrong Make sure everyone is heard Create rituals for healing and forgiveness Document the conflict resolutions Sources: Winer, M., & Ray, K., (2000). Collaboration handbook, Creating, sustaining and enjoying the journey. St. Paul, MN: Fieldstone Alliance; and Ray, K., (2002). The nimble collaboration – Fine-tuning your collaboration for lasting success. St. Paul, MN: Fieldstone Alliance.

18 Resolve the Irresolvable Call a meeting between the warring factions using a neutral facilitator to settle the dispute Create a working agreement between the parties and agree to disagree Ask people of influence who are associated with each of the factions to intervene Consider alerting funders and donors Work without or around the warring factions Source: Winer, M., & Ray, K., (2000). Collaboration handbook, Creating, sustaining and enjoying the journey. St. Paul, MN: Fieldstone Alliance.

19 When to Use an Outside Facilitator Group leaders are directly involved in the conflict The group is not skilled in conflict resolution Impartiality is essential Not all members of the group see the conflict Cultural equity needs to be ensured Resources allow hiring a practitioner A neutral volunteer is available The group wants conflict management instruction Source: Winer, M., & Ray, K., (2000). Collaboration handbook, Creating, sustaining and enjoying the journey. St. Paul, MN: Fieldstone Alliance.

20 Review Make sure your message is clear Practice active listening Acknowledge the viewpoints of others, even if you disagree Use specific language, especially when providing guidance and asking for feedback Ask questions to make sure your message is understood, or to clarify points you are uncertain about Make sure your body language delivers the same message as your words Think before you speak or write Keep your language simple and format brief

21 How well we communicate is determined not by how well we say things – but how well we are understood. ~ Andrew Grove, CEO, Intel Corporation

22 Closing Personal reflections Personal learning plan Quality improvement Session evaluation

23 Reflections I learned … I relearned … I will apply … I would like to know more about … I am surprised by …

24 Acknowledgements Allessandra, T., & O Connor, M.J. (1996). The platinum rule: Discover the four basic business personalities and how they can lead you to success. New York: Warner Books, Inc. GST Telecom. (n.d.). Communication styles table. Available from the CEDA Meta-Profession Project. Retrieved November 6, 2007, from www.cedanet.com/meta/communication_styles.htm www.cedanet.com/meta/communication_styles.htm Head Start Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (1996). Communicating with parents: Training guides for the Head Start learning community. Retrieved November 6, 2007, from www.headstartinfo.org/pdf/communicating_with_parents/communicating_with_parents.pdfwww.headstartinfo.org/pdf/communicating_with_parents/communicating_with_parents.pdf Heffner, C.L. (n.d.). Communication styles. Available from the CEDA Meta-Profession Project. Retrieved November 6, 2007, from www.cedanet.com/meta/communication_styles.htm Jourdain, K. (2004, February). Communication styles and conflict. Approaching Change, 4(6). Retrieved September 4, 2007, from www.co- creatingfutures.com/content.php?page_ID=348www.co- creatingfutures.com/content.php?page_ID=348 Jourdain, K. (2006, March). The power of stories. Approaching Change, 6(7). Retrieved September 4, 2007, from www.co- creatingfutures.com/content.php?page_ID=550www.co- creatingfutures.com/content.php?page_ID=550 National School Boards Foundation, & the National School Boards Association. (n.d.). Dealing with conflict. In Education leadership toolkit: Change and technology in Americas schools (Professional and Leadership Development section). Retrieved November 6, 2007, from www.nsba.org/sbot/toolkit/Conflict.html www.nsba.org/sbot/toolkit/Conflict.html Ray, K. L. (2002). The nimble collaboration: Fine-tuning your collaboration for lasting success. St. Paul, MN: Fieldstone Alliance. Winer, M. & Ray, K. (2000). Collaboration handbook: Creating, sustaining, and enjoying the journey. St. Paul, MN: Fieldstone Alliance.

25 Thank you! Facilitated by the National Child Care Information and Technical Assistance Center 10530 Rosehaven Street, Suite 400 Fairfax, VA 22030 Phone: 800-616-2242 Fax: 800-716-2242 TTY: 800-516-2242 Email: info@nccic.org Web: http://nccic.acf.hhs.gov PACT is an initiative of NCCIC, a service of the Child Care Bureau


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