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Srinivas Katipamula, Ph.D.

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1 Commercial Building Re-tuning: Overview and Key Operational Faults and Corrections
Srinivas Katipamula, Ph.D. Staff Scientist, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Better Building by Design – 2011 February 10th, Sheraton Conference Center Burlington, Vermont

2 Presentation Outline Learning Objectives
Definition of Retro-Commissioning and Re-tuning Why Retro-Commission a Building? Washington State Project Approach to Re-tuning U.S. Department of Energy Project on Re-tuning Overview of Re-tuning Training Identifying Low-cost/No-cost Operational Faults Using the Re-tuning Approach Common Operation Faults Example Operational Faults Results from Re-Tuning Buildings Conclusions

3 Efficiency Vermont is a Registered Provider with The American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems (AIA/CES). Credit(s) earned on completion of this program will be reported to AIA/CES for AIA members. Certificates of Completion for both AIA members and non-AIA members are available upon request. This program is registered with AIA/CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product. Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation. AIA Providers can use their own powerpoint template as long as it doesn’t have your company logos. To personalize this slide, please insert your company name in the purple area. You may change the color used in the text. All other wording on this slide is mandatory and cannot be changed.

4 At the end of this program, participants will be able to:
Learning Objectives At the end of this program, participants will be able to: Understand an overview of Commercial Building Re-Tuning Understand Key Building Operation Faults and Their Corrections (These presentations will provide an overview of the re-tuning process including the difference between re-tuning and other similar approaches) Describe the various steps in the re-tuning process Identify targets that commonly yield significant improvements in operation and decreases in energy use and discuss how re-tuning can yield a “gold mine” in savings To personalize this slide, please insert your four learning objectives in the purple area on this slide. You may change the color used in the text. Be sure that these four learning objectives are identical to the ones that were submitted on the course registration. Please remove the “sample slide” lingo from the upper right hand corner of the page.

5 Course Evaluations In order to maintain high-quality learning experiences, please access the evaluation for this course by logging into CES Discovery and clicking on the Course Evaluation link on the left side of the page. As a new requirement, Providers are required to encourage members to complete the online CES Discovery Evaluation. You may still use your own paper evaluation form to collect feedback for your personal records, however our online evaluation must still be encouraged.

6 Definitions HVAC Retro-commissioning HVAC Re-tuning
HVAC Re-commissioning HVAC Continuous CommissioningSM Monitoring-Based Commissioning All processes above in part relate to setting up control systems to some known design configurations, verifying set points and adding control algorithms

7 Why Retro-Commission a Buildings?

8 Retro-Commissioning Literature
A number of studies have shown that retro-commissioning buildings can lead to significant energy savings – 5 to 30% Cost of retro-commissioning varies between 0.1$/sf to 0.6$/sf Cost savings can range between 0.1$/sf to 0.75$/sf Simple payback ranging from 3 months to 3 years A number of the measures addressed by retro-commissioning relate to our inability to control the building operations

9 Why is Retro-Commissioning not Widely Used?
4/1/2017 Why is Retro-Commissioning not Widely Used? There is a perception that retro-commissioning can be expensive It can be expensive, but typically has less than 3 year paybacks There is a perception that measures addressed during retro-commissioning do not persist for a long time (>6 months)

10 Re-tuning can Fill the Gap
Re-tuning can address both the cost and the persistence question Because re-tuning is implemented by leveraging information from building automation system and primarily targets operational problems, cost of implementation is significantly lower than retro-commissioning Because re-tuning costs a fraction of retro-commissioning, it can be periodically done to ensure persistence

11 Origins for Re-Tuning In 1990s several researcher organizations were developing automated fault detection and diagnostics (FDD) tools – the researchers found that the FDD tools can indeed be used for commissioning building systems Also, at the same time Texas A&M University was using a process called continuous commissioning to retro-commission existing buildings In 2000s monitoring-based commissioning was being applied at many California campuses

12 What is Re-Tuning? A systematic process to identify and correct building operational problems that lead to energy waste Implemented primarily through the building control system at no cost other than the labor required to perform the re-tuning process Includes small, low-cost repairs, such as replacing faulty sensors Includes identifying other opportunities for improving energy efficiency that require investment Might be thought of as a scaled-down retro-commissioning focused on identifying and correcting operational problems

13 Major Focus Areas in Re-Tuning
Occupancy scheduling Discharge-air temperature control Discharge-air static pressure control Air-handling unit (AHU) heating & cooling AHU outside/fresh air makeup AHU economizer operation Zone conditioning Meter profiles Central plant

14 Purpose of Re-Tuning Improve the building’s energy efficiency through low-cost and no-cost operational improvements (mostly control changes) Identify opportunities to further increase the building’s energy efficiency Identify problems requiring physical repair Catch the big energy saving opportunities

15 Life Cycle of Retro-Commissioning/Re-Tuning
Typical commercial building behavior over time Energy Consumption Periodic Re-tuning Ensures Persistence Continuous Re-tuning Maximizes Persistence Time

16 Washington State Re-Tuning Pilot Project

17 Large Commercial Buildings Project
Goal Educate companies that large buildings can be re-tuned economically to save electricity Teach the proper techniques and skills to perform re-tuning, and Show that service providers can provide re-tuning as a service for a fee Approach Recruit 5 to 10 companies that provide HVAC services to commercial buildings to deliver re-tuning services and to help recruit customers Each of the selected service providers are required to recruit at least 6 buildings for re-tuning Use 10 to 20 of the buildings as training grounds for hands-on training of the HVAC service providers on how to perform re-tuning

18 U.S. Department of Energy Re-Tuning Project

19 U.S. Department of Energy Re-Tuning Training Outreach
Re-tuning Training was Originally Developed as part of a Project Funded by Washington State (www.retuning.org) Extending Training Outreach Beyond WA State (www.pnl.gov/buildingretuning) Organization with large building stock interested in getting trained in the re-tuning process Train-the-trainer – secondary goal Working with a number of organizations to recruit for both the above approaches

20 Online Interactive Re-Tuning Training
PNNL is also converting the training into an online interactive training Role based training with help of learning management system Modular Interactive with ability to create abnormal conditions Questions and answers at the end each module and at the end of the course PNNL is also looking to automate identification of the no-cost/low-cost operational problems To improve persistence and cost of retro-commissioning

21 Project Objective Improve operational efficiency of the commercial building sector by transferring the skills to “re-tune” large commercial buildings Training building operators and service providers in the general principles and practices of good energy management Publicizing the results of the project to other building operators and HVAC service providers, who are not part of the training, and to customers to encourage widespread adoption of these energy-saving methods Preparing case studies to quantify comfort impact and energy savings resulting from re-tuning

22 Overview of Re-tuning Training

23 Re-tuning Training Training consists of two parts Classroom training
6 to 8 hours, limited to 20 to 25 people Field training 1 day to 3 days, depending on the size of the building Limited to 4 to 8 people

24 Intent of Re-tuning Training
Provide an in-depth training of the re-tuning approach Prepare the participating technicians for hands-on field training Provide an opportunity to ask questions and get clarification on any aspect of the re-tuning process “Tell me and I'll forget; show me and I may remember; involve me and I'll understand” Chinese Proverb

25 Six Primary Steps of Re-Tuning
Collecting Initial Building Information: Basic building information Pre-Re-Tuning Phase: Trend-data collection and analysis Building Walk Down: Getting to know the building Re-Tuning: Identifying and correcting operations problems Post Re-Tuning: Reporting re-tuning findings Savings Analysis: Determining and reporting the impacts

26 Six Primary Steps of Re-Tuning
Collecting Initial Building Information: Basic building information Pre-Re-Tuning Phase: Trend-data collection and analysis Building Walk Down: Getting to know the building Re-Tuning: Identifying and correcting operations problems Post Re-Tuning: Reporting re-tuning findings Savings Analysis: Determining and reporting the impacts

27 Information to Collect
Overall building geometry Approximate gross square feet Number of floors General building shape Type of HVAC system(s) Approximate number of zones Approximate number of each major type of equipment Boilers Chillers Air handlers Type of building automation system (manufacturer, model, version)

28 Collecting basic building information
If you manage the building, you probably have all or most of this information at your fingertips Gather information to guide selection of trend logs to set up in the next phase Determine the overall design of the building and its mechanical systems

29 Six Primary Steps of Re-Tuning
Collecting Initial Building Information: Basic building information Pre-Re-Tuning Phase: Trend-data collection and analysis Building Walk Down: Getting to know the building Re-Tuning: Identifying and correcting operations problems Post Re-Tuning: Reporting re-tuning findings Savings Analysis: Determining and reporting the impacts

30 Trend-Data Collection & Analysis: Purpose
Detect potential operational problems even before visiting the building Identify problems that require time histories to detect – incorrect schedules, no use of setback during unoccupied modes, poor economizer operation

31 Steps for Trend Data Collection
Develop a monitoring plan – develop forms to guide service providers through this. Plan includes the points to trend and for each point: Planned trend start time Planned trend end time Length of measurement period (2 weeks recommended) Time interval between logged measurements (30 minutes or less recommended) Measurement units (e.g., F for temperature) Implement trend logs in control system

32 Analyze Trend Log Data – Major Steps
Download trend log data files from BAS Format data files for compatibility with the spreadsheet analysis tool Open data files in spreadsheet analysis tool and automatically generate graphs Review graphs to identify operational issues Record operational issues for reference during re-tuning

33 Review Graphs & Identify Operation Issues
Issues to investigate with trend log data PNNL spreadsheets automatically generate graphs needed We’ll look at some examples of what to look for Online reference document provides additional information and examples, which you can refer to any time you need to (see Seven issues Occupancy Scheduling DAT Control DAP Control AHU heating and cooling at the same time. AHU OSA problems AHU Econo problems Zone conditions Meter profiles Central Plant

34 ECAM ≡ Energy Charting And Metrics
ECAM Software ECAM ≡ Energy Charting And Metrics Five Easy, Simple Steps Select data from existing spreadsheet Map points (optional; required for Re-tuning) Create schedules (optional) Input energy project dates (optional) Create metrics and charts Will go thru at lunch time and show how it works.

35 Re-tuning Menu

36 ECAM: Example AHU Time Series Charts
Outdoor, return, mixed, and discharge air temperatures vs. time Discharge air temperature and discharge air temperature set point vs. time Outdoor air fraction and damper position signal vs. time Outdoor and return air temperatures, damper position signal vs. time Damper, chilled water valve, and hot water valve position signals vs. time Damper position signal vs. time Discharge static pressure vs. time Supply fan speed, status, and static pressure vs. time Return fan speed and status vs. time

37 ECAM: Example AHU Scatter Charts
Discharge air temperature vs. discharge air temperature set point Chilled water signal vs. hot water signal Damper signal vs. outdoor air temperature Mixed air temperature vs. outside air temperature

38 ECAM: Example Zone Charts
Zone damper position signal, reheat valve position signal, occupancy mode, and Zone temperature vs. time.

39 ECAM: Example Central Plant Charts
CHW supply, return, ΔT, and outdoor air temperature vs. time HW supply, return, ΔT, and outdoor air temperature vs. time CHW flow and outdoor air temperature vs. time

40 Six Primary Steps of Re-Tuning
Collecting Initial Building Information: Basic building information Pre-Re-Tuning Phase: Trend-data collection and analysis Building Walk Down: Getting to know the building Re-Tuning: Identifying and correcting operations problems Post Re-Tuning: Reporting re-tuning findings Savings Analysis: Determining and reporting the impacts

41 Building Walk Down: Purpose
Get to know the building better Develop a general impression of: Overall building condition Overall building design HVAC system design Collect some basic data on the building systems at a level of detail greater than the initial data collection

42 Building Walk Down: Major Steps
Review electrical and mechanical prints Walk the outside of the building Walk the inside of the building Walk down the roof Walk down the air handlers Walk down the plant area Review the DDC system (BAS) front end

43 Six Primary Steps of Re-Tuning
Collecting Initial Building Information: Basic building information Pre-Re-Tuning Phase: Trend-data collection and analysis Building Walk Down: Getting to know the building Re-Tuning: Identifying and correcting operations problems Post Re-Tuning: Reporting re-tuning findings Savings Analysis: Determining and reporting the impacts

44 Occupancy Scheduling Shut off systems whenever possible
Night unoccupied schedules Weekend unoccupied schedules Daytime no or low use unoccupied schedules Auditorium, class rooms, conference rooms Includes lighting Includes specialized exhaust Do not restart too early Use a startup schedule based on building needs Do not use fresh air during warm-up except last 30 minutes for flushing building 44

45 Occupancy Scheduling (continued)
Shut off systems whenever possible Refrain from starting up system for the occasional nighttime user or weekend user Use bypass buttons Unoccupied mode is a major cost saver Simple to implement Simple to track Simple to administer Sometimes the least paid employee is the most costly Janitors working at night with all HVAC running, all fresh air open & lights on Is this required?

46 Occupancy Scheduling (continued)
When running at night for warm up, cool down, or maintaining temperatures, do not ventilate (no outside air) Run static pressure at ½ of normal set points, if it does not affect reheat controls Check to make sure heated areas get full air in unoccupied modes Push unoccupied mode air to where it is needed Set VAV boxes in interior zones to unoccupied with 0 air flow Set VAV boxes with reheat to a high air flow in unoccupied mode, so box will be 100% open during night cycling Air gets to zones needing heat

47 Occupancy Scheduling (continued)
Building electric consumption should show significant energy drop for nights/weekends Signifying setbacks are active on all HVAC systems Base load versus peak loads should be at least 30% difference and as much as 50% with aggressive setbacks Trended data for zone temps should show 5-10oF deviations from set points when setbacks are active during non-shoulder months Winter zone temps should drop down to 60-65oF and summer zone temps should rise to 80-85oF

48 Occupancy Schedule (continued)
Trended data for discharge static pressures should show readings of 0” or at least 50% (half) of normal (occupied) static pressure readings Trended data for main supply/return fan status should indicate “OFF” during unoccupied periods Trended data for VAV boxes occupied status should indicate “Unoccupied” during unoccupied periods Trended data for support systems (reheat pumps, reheat converters, reheat hot water boilers, chillers, towers, pumps, etc) should indicate they are turning off at night, if all areas of the building are also shut down

49 Occupancy Schedule (continued)
Unoccupied periods should include weekends, holidays and night hours during work week periods If facility has sporadic use periods, this may require additional efforts to succeed at implementing setbacks Make sure the “tail” is not “wagging the dog” – janitors, special events, extreme weather events, overrides, etc How does your organization respond to trouble calls (occupant complaints)? How do you respond? Is the response a “band-aid” or a long-term solution? Overrides on schedules are not long-term solutions

50 Air Handler Data Analysis
4/1/2017 Air Handler Data Analysis Key conditions to look for while analyzing the charts: Unoccupied or 24/7 operation Unoccupied hour setback Lower/higher than expected supply air temperature Excessive outdoor air intake During occupied periods During pre-/pre-cooling periods Significant reheat during summer/cooling season Is the supply fan modulating (if VAV) Higher than normal static pressure Set point and static pressure resets Economizer is not utilized or not working properly

51 Fan Operation During Occupied and Unoccupied Periods

52 Air Handler Data Analysis: Static Pressure
Purpose: Determine whether the static pressure set point is too high or too low Approach: For each air handler, review a plot of the damper positions of all VAV units vs. time Look for situations where: Most dampers are nearly closed during cooling – static pressure too high Several VAV boxes on an air handler have dampers fully open – static pressure is too low and VAV boxes are not able to meet zone loads – starved boxes Dampers are not modulating as conditions change – VAV boxes that are not being controlled or not responding to control signals

53 Zone Heating and Cooling Demands (continued): Example Use of Graphs
Plot of VAV unit dampers vs. time for all VAV units served by an air handler – Very Good Distribution – Most 50% to 75% open

54 Zone Heating and Cooling Demands (continued): Example Use of Graphs
Plot of VAV unit dampers vs. time for all VAV units served by an air handler – Distribution Marginally OK

55 Zone Heating and Cooling Demands (continued): Example Use of Graphs
Plot of VAV unit dampers vs. time for all VAV units served by an air handler – Bad Distribution – Too many near fully open

56 Zone Heating and Cooling Demands (continued): Example Use of Graphs
Plot of VAV unit dampers vs. time for all VAV units served by an air handler – Bad Distribution – Too many near fully closed

57 Zone Damper Position 50% or less 50~99% 100% Some building automation systems provide information about the status of zone dampers Plotting the information as a function of time, will tell you whether or not the fan static pressure is appropriate 162 - (82%) 27 (14%) 8 (4%)

58 Air Handler Data Analysis: Discharge Set point
Purpose Review discharge air temperatures for the air handlers Determine whether discharge air temperatures are maintained relatively stable Determine whether the discharge-air temperatures are too cool or too warm Approach For each air handler monitored, review plots of discharge-air temperature and discharge-air set point vs. time and supply-air temperature vs. supply-air set point Look for deviations between discharge-air temperatures and set points Look for unusually high (> 70F) or low (< 55F) discharge-air temperatures

59 Air Handling Unit: Minimum Outdoor-Air Operations
Purpose Review minimum outdoor-air operations Determine whether sufficient outdoor air is being supplied for ventilation Determine whether more outdoor air than needed is being brought in at times (e.g., when the outdoor-air temperature < 40F or > 60F or when the zones served are unoccupied) Determine whether outdoor-air dampers close during night and weekend setback and during startup mode in the morning.

60 Air Handling Unit: Minimum Outdoor-Air Operations (continued)
Approach For each air-side economizer, review plots of: Outdoor-air fraction (OAF) vs. time Outdoor-air damper and occupancy mode vs. time Outdoor-air fraction vs. fan speed (if available) Determine if OAF > minimum OAF for ventilation when the system is not economizing Determine whether outdoor-air ventilation is being provided when the building is unoccupied and ventilation is not required for some other reason If OAF and fan speed are tracking each other, it is an indication of return-air problems 20% damper position is never 20% outdoor air Need to add oaf formula

61 Air Handling Unit: Minimum Outdoor-Air Operations (continued)
Potential issues to identify Insufficient outdoor-air ventilation provided – minimum outdoor-air fraction (OAF) is too low Too much outdoor-air ventilation provided when the air handler is not economizing Too much outdoor-air ventilation provided during unoccupied times (nights and weekends), during setback Use air fraction to find % of outside air Works if air is mixed relatively evenly OAF = ((Return-Mixed)/(Return-Outside))*100 Add into code for all air handlers and track history Especially schools and other public spaces

62 Economizer Fundamentals The Basics of Airside Economizers
Airside Economizer: “A duct-and-damper arrangement and automatic control system that, together, allow a cooling system to supply outdoor air to reduce or eliminate the need for mechanical cooling during mild or cold weather.” Return Air Relief Air Supply Air Outdoor Air Airside economizers simply utilize air source energy from outside the building to cool the building or to supplement the mechanical cooling system. Typically a air source system will use duct work on a central air handling unit (AHU) or on a packaged rooftop unit (RTU). Typically automatic controls will operate the economizer cycle automatically. _______________________________________________________________ Source: ASHRAE Standard

63 Potential Economizer Savings from Enthalpy Control
Approximately 15% Savings _______________________________________________________________ Source: Honeywell Controls

64 Economizer Operation Purpose
To determine whether air-side economizers are operating properly Do economizers open, close, and/or modulate under appropriate conditions? At what temperature compared to the discharge temperature? At what apparent control signal values do the economizers open? Does the cooling coil operate (chilled water flow) during economizing?

65 Economizer Operation (continued)
Approach For each air-side economizer, review plots of: Outdoor-air temperature, mixed-air temperature, return-air temperature and discharge-air temperature vs. time Outdoor-air damper position (% open), outdoor-air temperature, and return-air temperature vs. time Outdoor-air damper position and chilled-water valve position (% open) vs. time Look for outdoor-air dampers (economizer) open at unusual times of day or under unusual outdoor temperature conditions Look for outdoor-air dampers not open to economizer under favorable conditions (outdoor-air temperature between 40F and 60F) Look for outdoor-air damper not closing to minimum position for freeze prevention when outdoor temperature is less than about 40F

66 Economizer Operation (continued)
Potential issues to identify Incorrect economizer operation – numerous causes (identified later during on-site work) Incorrect control strategy Stuck dampers Disconnected or damaged linkages Failed actuator Disconnected wires Failed, uncalibrated or miscalibrated sensors 2 X 4 in damper Others?

67 Economizer Operation (continued): Example use of Graphs – 1 Day
Return Discharge Outdoor Mixed

68 Economizer Operation (continued): Example use of Graphs – 3 Days

69 Economizer Operation (continued): Example use of Graphs – 1 Day - Faulty
Outdoor-Air Damper Stuck Fully Closed Return Mixed Discharge Outdoor

70 Economizer Operation (continued): Example use of Graphs – 1 Day - Faulty
Outdoor-Air Damper Stuck Fully Open Return Discharge Outdoor Mixed

71 ECAM: AHU Scatter Plot Sample

72 Why Economizers Fail and Increase Energy Use
Jammed or frozen outside-air damper Broken and/or disconnected linkage Nonfunctioning actuator or disconnected wire Malfunctioning outside air/return air temperature sensor Malfunctioning controller Faulty control settings Installed wrong or wired incorrectly Disconnected Damper _______________________________________________________________ Source: Financial Times Energy Wired poorly Jammed/Frozen Damper

73 Poorly Designed Packaged Rooftop Units with Economizer Installed Next to Heat Source from Condenser
This economizer in this picture will never work correctly because of the rejected heat from the condenser at the intake of the outside air dampers. _______________________________________________________________

74 Inefficient Designs on RTU Contribute to Poor Air Circulation at Intake Air
Notice, this picture shows brand new RTU equipment on a building in Notice the outside air intake is either right on top of the exhaust or next to the exhaust on the unit. The bottom right picture shows a exhaust damper against a wall. Adjacent to the wall, next to the exhaust is the outside air intake for bring fresh air into the building. This is not a good design and will never work properly unless duct work is added to the unit to exhaust the air properly. _______________________________________________________________ 74

75 Air Handling Unit: Outdoor-Air Lockouts for Heating & Cooling (continued)
Potential issues to identify Air-handler heating and cooling coils operating simultaneously Heating and cooling lockouts possibly overlapping (need to be confirmed in control-code settings during on-site re-tuning) Unreasonable values are set for the heating and cooling lockouts

76 Outdoor-Air Lockouts for Heating & Cooling (continued): Example use of Graphs
Air handler heating vs. cooling valve positions Worse Bad

77 Zone Heating and Cooling Demands
Purpose Get a feel for how many zones on each monitored air handler are heating and how many are cooling at the same time Get a sense of which areas are heating and which are cooling at any given time Determine if any individual zones are heating and cooling at the same time Others?

78 Zone Heating and Cooling Demands (continued)
Approach For each air handler, count the number of zones served that are in heating mode and those in cooling mode under various conditions (e.g., time of day and approximate outdoor air temperature). Use a plot of number of zones in each mode and the outdoor temperature vs. time Note which areas of the building (e.g., interior core vs. perimeter zones or zones facing certain directions) are in heating and cooling Look for any monitored zones that are using both heating and cooling over relatively short time periods or cycling between heating and cooling

79 Zone Heating and Cooling Demands (continued)
Potential issues to identify Supply-air temperature too cool or too warm No use of supply-air reset Certain zones (e.g., corner offices) driving air handler operation Some zones out of control, oscillating between heating and cooling Others

80 Importance of Terminal Units Re-tuning
4/1/2017 Importance of Terminal Units Re-tuning Terminal boxes are major building HVAC components and directly impact comfort and energy costs Terminal boxes control may cause occupant discomfort and waste energy, if they have inappropriate operation and control Improper minimum air flow setting and control may result in significant simultaneous heating and cooling, extra fan power consumption and higher energy consumption in the summer

81 Sign of Problem with Zone Control!

82 Sign of Problem with Zone Control!

83 What’s Wrong with this? Thermostat

84 Central Plant and Whole Building Meter Profiles
Training also covers Chiller and boiler plants Meter profiles

85 Re-tuning Examples

86 Re-tuning Example VFD speed is greater than 80% before re-tuning; note the speed after re-tuning

87 Re-tuning Example (cont)
Lockout chilled water consumption in winter

88 Re-tuning Example (cont)
Eliminated alternating cooling/heating

89 Six Primary Steps of Re-Tuning
Collecting initial building information: Basic building information Pre-Re-Tuning Phase: Trend-data collection and analysis Building Walk Down: Getting to know the building Re-Tuning: Identifying and correcting operations problems Post-Re-Tuning: Reporting re-tuning findings Savings Analysis: Determining and reporting the impacts

90 Post-Re-Tuning: Calculating Energy Savings – Overview of Approach
Calculated as the difference between the actual energy use in the post-re-tuning 12 months and the energy use that would have occurred during the same 12 months if the building had not been re-tuned. = energy savings for a specific building (j) = actual measured energy use of the building during the 12 months after re-tuning = energy consumption of the building during the 12 months after re-tuning if it had not been re-tuned

91 Highlights of Re-Tuning
Every set point adjustment made will have an impact of some sort on the utility meter Can save energy and keep occupants comfortable It takes time to tune a building There are no magic set points that work all the time Always monitor the utility meters (gas & electric) to see what affect you have had Look at the big picture when making adjustments Watch the meter profiles weekly Learn and know the building’s personality

92 Questions?


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