Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The 20 Hour Basic Successful Solutions Professional Development LLC Chapter 4 Food Safety Module 8.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The 20 Hour Basic Successful Solutions Professional Development LLC Chapter 4 Food Safety Module 8."— Presentation transcript:

1 The 20 Hour Basic Successful Solutions Professional Development LLC Chapter 4 Food Safety Module 8

2 Chapter Topics The food program in a child care center serves many purposes. Proper food handling, food preparation, and serving children nutritious meals are extremely important. Eating meals together can help children to develop social skills and good eating habits. Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8

3 Food safety knowledge can help you protect yourself and others. Child care centers provide food and services to a highly susceptible population have additional food safety requirements. Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety

4 You must develop and implement a system to monitor the temperature of potentially hazardous foods during cooking, reheating, cooling, storing, and hot and cold holding temperatures to be sure that food will be cooked to at least the minimum correct internal temperature: Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety 165°F (for 15 seconds) Poultry (chicken and turkey) Stuffed foods or stuffing Casseroles All raw animal products cooked in a microwave All reheated potentially hazardous foods

5 You must develop and implement a system to monitor the temperature of potentially hazardous foods during cooking, reheating, cooling, storing, and hot and cold holding temperatures to be sure that food will be cooked to at least the minimum correct internal temperature: Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety 155°F (for 15 seconds) Hamburger Sausage

6 You must develop and implement a system to monitor the temperature of potentially hazardous foods during cooking, reheating, cooling, storing, and hot and cold holding temperatures to be sure that food will be cooked to at least the minimum correct internal temperature: Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety 145°F (for 15 seconds) Eggs Fish Beef Pork

7 You must develop and implement a system to monitor the temperature of potentially hazardous foods during cooking, reheating, cooling, storing, and hot and cold holding temperatures to be sure that food will be cooked to at least the minimum correct internal temperature: Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety 140°F Vegetables that will be hot held Packaged ready-to-eat foods (such as hot dogs and canned chili) that are heated for hot Holding

8 You must develop a system to record the temperature of each perishable food once it arrives from a satellite kitchen or a catering service. The system must include keeping records on site for six months with the following information: Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety The name and temperature of the food The date and time the temperature was checked, and The name and signature or recognized initials of the person who is checking and recording the food temperatures.

9 You may serve previously prepared food that has not been previously served if it was stored at the proper temperature for less than forty-eight hours after preparation. Leftover foods or opened foods in the refrigerator must be labeled with the date that they were opened or cooked. You must store food: Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety 1. In the original containers or in clean, labeled containers that are airtight and off the floor 2. In a manner that prevents contamination from other sources 3. In an area separate from toxic materials such as cleaning supplies, paint, or pesticides 4. That is not past the manufacturers expiration or freshness date 5. In a refrigerator or freezer if cooking is required 6. Raw meat, poultry or fish kept in the refrigerator must be stored separate, below other foods, particularly foods that are eaten fresh 7. Foods not requiring refrigeration must be kept at least six inches above the floor in a clean, dry, ventilated storeroom or other area 8. Dry bulk foods not in their original containers, in containers with tight fitting covers. Containers must be labeled and dated

10 Remember, bacteria grow quickly when food is in the Danger Zone. Keep cold food cold in a refrigerator, in ice, or other approved method to keep bacteria from growing. When using ice to keep food cold, the ice must surround the container to the top level of the food. COLD food must be kept 41°F or colder. Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety Potentially hazardous salads made from food at room temperature (such as canned tuna) must be cooled to 41°F within 4 hours of preparation. It is better to make salads and sandwich fillers with cold ingredients when possible.

11 1. In the Refrigerator Frozen foods must be thawed safely to keep bacteria from growing. Unsafe thawing can let bacteria grow in the outside layers of the food while the inside layers are still frozen. There are three safe methods for thawing food: Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety Put frozen food in the refrigerator until it is thawed. This method is the slowest and the safest. Be sure that raw meats are on the bottom shelf or in a container so they do not drip onto other foods.

12 2. Submerged under cold running water Frozen foods must be thawed safely to keep bacteria from growing. Unsafe thawing can let bacteria grow in the outside layers of the food while the inside layers are still frozen. There are three safe methods for thawing food: Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety Keep the food covered in cold (70°F or colder), running water until it is thawed.

13 3. As part of the cooking process or in the microwave Frozen foods must be thawed safely to keep bacteria from growing. Unsafe thawing can let bacteria grow in the outside layers of the food while the inside layers are still frozen. There are three safe methods for thawing food: Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety Small items, such as frozen burritos, may be thawed while they cook.

14 Cooked leftovers that were not served to customers may be cooled to be served again. Because bacteria can grow quickly in cooling food, cooling is often the riskiest step in food preparation. Please take cooling seriously; certain bacteria can make poisons that are not destroyed by reheating temperatures. Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety It is important to cool food through the Danger Zone as fast as possible to keep bacteria from growing.

15 1.Shallow pan method (food no more than 2 inches deep) 2.Size reduction (cutting solid food into smaller pieces) 3.Time and temperature monitored (forcing food to cool in a short amount of time) There are three approved cooling methods in Washington: Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety

16 Divide large containers of food into several shallow pans to cool. This method works well for foods like refried beans, rice, potatoes, casseroles, ground meat, meatloaf, and chili. Here are the steps for the shallow pan method. Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety Cooling Method 1: Shallow Pan Method 1.Put hot food into shallow pans. Make sure the food is not more than 2 inches thick or deep. 2.Put the pans in the refrigerator on the top shelf where nothing can drip into them. 3.Let air move around the pans – do not stack or cover the pans. 4.Cover the pans after the food is 41°F or colder.

17 A large whole food like turkey or ham may be cut into slices to be cooled. This method may not be used for meat that is ground or restructured such as meatloaf or gyro meat. Here are the steps for the size reduction method. Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety Cooling Method 2: Size Reduction 1.Cut the cooked meat into pieces no more than 4 inches thick. Be sure to wear gloves if you handle the food. 2.Spread the slices out on a tray so they are not touching each other. 3.Put the pans in the refrigerator on the top shelf where nothing can drip into them. 4.Let air move around the pans – do not stack or cover the pans. 5.Cover the pans after the food is 41°F or colder.

18 Food may also be cooled using a 2-step process as long as you monitor the temperature of the food and make sure it cools down in a certain amount of time. Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety Cooling Method 3: Time and Temperature Monitored Step 1: Food must cool from 140°F to 70°F in 2 hours Step 2: Food must finish cooling to 41°F within a total of 6 hours An example of the 2-step method is called an ice bath. An ice bath works well for soups, sauces, and gravy.

19 Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety Cooling Method 3: Time and Temperature Monitored Here are the steps for an ice bath. 1.Close the drain in the sink. Put the pot of hot food in the sink. 2.Fill the sink with ice up to the level of the food in the pot. Add cold 3.water to the ice. 4.Stir the food often. Make sure it cools down to 70°F within 2 hours. 5.Add more ice as the ice melts. 6.Finish cooling the food to 41°F within 6 hours. 7.Once the food is 41°F, cover it and put in the refrigerator.

20 Cross contamination happens when bacteria from raw foods get onto other foods. Raw meat is the main source of cross contamination. When blood or juice from raw chicken or other meat gets onto a counter, cutting board, utensils, or hands, bacteria can spread to other food. It is important to keep raw meat away from other food. Cross contamination is the spread of bacteria from raw meat to other foods. Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety

21 Tips to avoid cross contamination: Wash hands after handling raw meat Wash and sanitize all food-contact surfaces that touch raw meat Prepare raw meat in an area away from other foods Use a separate cutting board for raw meat Store raw meat below other foods in the refrigerator and freezer Store meat with a higher cooking temperature (like chicken) below meat With a lower cooking temperature (like fish) Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety

22 Cleaning and sanitizing are not the same. Cleaning uses soap and water to remove dirt and food from surfaces. Sanitizing uses chemicals or heat to kill germs. It is important to remember that surfaces that look clean may still have germs on them that you cant see. Sanitizing reduces these germs to safer levels. Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety Food-contact surfaces should be washed, rinsed, and sanitized after each use to remove germs that can cause illness.

23 Washing Dishes by Hand All dishes and food-contact surfaces must be washed, rinsed, and sanitized between uses. When washing dishes by hand, follow this procedure: Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety 1.CLEAN 1.CLEAN and sanitize the sink 2.SCRAPE 2.SCRAPE leftover food into the garbage 3.WASH 3.WASH dishes in hot, soapy water in the first sink 4.RINSE 4.RINSE dishes with clean, hot water in the second sink 5.SANITIZE 5.SANITIZE by submerging dishes in a bleach solution (1 tablespoon bleach per gallon of cool water) for one minute. 6.AIR DRY 6.AIR DRY all dishes and utensils instead of using a towel

24 Washing Dishes in a Dishwasher A dishwasher will wash, rinse, and sanitize dishes, equipment, and utensils. Make sure you: Scrape leftover food and grease from the dishes and throw it away. Load dishes into the machine and run the full cycle. Air dry the dishes and utensils. Do not use a towel to dry them. In order to properly sanitize dishes using heat, the dishwasher must reach a temperature of 140° F. This will kill germs. If your dishwasher has a sanicycle, the final rinse water heats to this temperature. A maximum registering or holding thermometer is needed to check dishwashing equipment. Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety

25 You need to have the following equipment to cook and serve meals without restrictions on the type of menus or foods that you can cook, serve or store: Kitchen walls, counter tops, floors, cabinets and shelves that are: Maintained in good repair to include being properly sealed without chips or cracks Moisture resistant, and Maintained in a clean and sanitary condition. A range with a properly vented hood or exhaust fan, except when serving only snacks Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety

26 More required equipment: A refrigerator and a freezer, or a combination refrigerator/freezer, with sufficient space for proper storage and cooling of food Handwashing facilities located in or adjacent to the food preparation area with handwashing procedures posted at each sink used for handwashing and followed by all persons who participate in food preparation. Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety You may use a microwave oven to reheat foods if the food is: Rotated or stirred during heating Covered to retain moisture, and Held for two minutes prior to serving to allow the temperature to spread evenly throughout the food.

27 Young children can be at risk for choking on foods: Infants and toddlers have limited control of their mouth muscles and lack the molars to grind up hard foods. Three- to four-year-olds lack chewing sophistication and are easily distracted while eating. Certain foods pose choking risks. These include nuts, seeds, whole grapes, hot dogs, hard candy, whole corn, popcorn, chips, tough meats, and sticky foods such as peanut butter, processed cheese, marshmallows and fruit roll-ups. Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety

28 Children can choke on any food and MUST be supervised while they are eating. Make sure all children are seated to eat. Modify foods to be smaller or softer (dice melons into small pieces and steam broccoli and carrots). Discourage children from eating too fast or pocketing food. Remind parents of the hazards of feeding children in cars or on buses. Do not serve these foods to children under the age of 4 years: Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety 1. Spoonfuls of peanut butter 2. Marshmallows 3. Nuts, seeds, and peanuts 4. Fish with bones 5. Hot dogs (whole or sliced in rounds) 6. Popcorn 7. Whole grapes 8. Raisins 9. Pretzels10. Tough meats 11. Processed cheese 12. Fresh broccoli13. Large chunks of meat14. Raw carrots15. Dried fruit 16. Hard candy 17. Raw peas18. Ice cubes 19. Chips 20. Whole corn 21. Sticky foods 22. Fruit roll-ups

29 2 Click here to launch Chapter 4 Assessment Module 8 – Feeding and Care Module 8 Chapter 4 Food Safety


Download ppt "The 20 Hour Basic Successful Solutions Professional Development LLC Chapter 4 Food Safety Module 8."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google