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Conducting Workplace Inspections Supervisors’ Training Developed and provided by: Department of Occupational Health and Safety York University Telephone:

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Presentation on theme: "Conducting Workplace Inspections Supervisors’ Training Developed and provided by: Department of Occupational Health and Safety York University Telephone:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Conducting Workplace Inspections Supervisors’ Training Developed and provided by: Department of Occupational Health and Safety York University Telephone: ; ext WELCOME TO Workplace Inspection WEB-BASED TRAINING SESSION! The Workplace Inspection training is developed and provided by the Department of Occupational Health & Safety (DOHS) to assist all supervisory personnel at York University in conducting workplace inspections in their areas. Conducting regular workplace inspections helps the supervisors to recognize the health & safety hazards in their areas and take corrective measures before an accident happens, basically being proactive in addressing health and safety concerns and preventing accidents. The workplace inspection training along with Occupational Health & Safety Act and Accident Investigation is a mandatory training for all supervisors at York University. The Department of Occupational Health & Safety recommends that refresher training be taken once every 3 years.

2 Learning Objectives The objectives of this session are to outline:
Roles and Responsibilities under the Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) Importance of Workplace Inspections Planning and Conducting an Inspection Documentation and Findings Sample workplace inspection forms By the end of this session, you will be able to learn about: The Roles and Responsibilities of workplace parties under the Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) The Importance of Workplace Inspections Planning and Conducting an Inspection Documentation and Findings Sample workplace inspection forms

3 RESPONSIBILITIES UNDER THE OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT (OHSA): A Reminder
The OHS Act defines Duties and Responsibilities for: Employers: a person who employs one or more workers or contractors for the services of one or more workers… Supervisors: a person who has charge of a workplace or authority over a worker Workers: a person who performs work or supplies services for monetary compensation… Joint Health and Safety Committees (JHSCs) Health and Safety Representatives (H & S Rep’s) Students (as part of York University’s Occupational Health & Safety Policy) As outlined in the Occupational Health and Safety Act, health and safety in the workplace is a shared responsibility of all workplace parties: including employers, supervisors and workers. The OHSA defines the roles and responsibilities of workplace parties as well as outlining the functions of the JHSCs and health & safety representatives. Students are an exception, not covered by the Act. Responsibilities for students are outlined in the York University’s Occupational Health & Safety Policy: “Students are responsible to conduct themselves in a manner consistent with their health and safety and that of others. Failure to do so may be considered a breach of Presidential Regulations governing student conduct”.

4 RESPONSIBILITIES UNDER OHSA: EMPLOYERS (OHSA, Sec. 25, 26)
Responsibilities that require workplace inspection and hazard identification: Acquaint a worker or a supervisor with any hazard in the workplace [Sec. 25 (2)(d)] Ensure that equipment, materials and protective devices are provided, issued and maintained in good condition [Sec. 25(1)(a,b) Ensure that the measures and procedures prescribed are carried out in the workplace [Sec. 25 (1) (c)] Take every precaution reasonable under the circumstances for the protection of a worker [Sec. 25 (2) (h)] NB: The responsibilities incumbent on the University as an employer are delegated to various levels of supervisory staff. In practice, many of the duties of the employer are exercised by senior administrative managers. As described in sections 25 & 26 of the OHS Act, the employers have the following responsibilities that require workplace inspection and hazard identification: Acquaint a worker or a supervisor with any hazard in the workplace [Sec. 25 (2)(d)] Ensure that equipment, materials and protective devices are provided, issued and maintained in good condition [Sec. 25(1)(a,b) Ensure that the measures and procedures prescribed are carried out in the workplace [Sec. 25 (1) (c)] Take every precaution reasonable under the circumstances for the protection of a worker [Sec. 25 (2) (h)] Note that the responsibilities incumbent on the University as an employer are delegated to various levels of supervisory staff. In practice, many of the duties of the employer are exercised by senior administrative managers.

5 RESPONSIBILITIES UNDER OHSA: SUPERVISORS (OHSA, Sec. 27) & WORKERS (Sec.28)
SUPERVISORS: Responsibilities that require workplace inspection: Ensure that a worker works in the manner and with the protective devices, measures and procedures required by the OHSA and Regulations Ensure that a worker uses or wears the protective devices that the employer requires to be worn or used Ensure only authorized and qualified workers operate equipment Advise workers of potential or actual dangers in the workplace Take every precaution reasonable under the circumstances to protect workers ** The best way to ensure the above is to inspect work areas for hazards on a regular basis** WORKERS: Must report hazards that they have identified. The Supervisor is defined in the OHS Act as the person who has charge of a workplace or authority over a worker. The responsibilities under the OHS Act that require supervisors to conduct workplace inspections include: Ensure that a worker works in the manner and with the protective devices, measures and procedures required by the OHSA and Regulations Ensure that a worker uses or wears the protective devices that the employer requires to be worn or used Ensure only authorized and qualified workers operate equipment Advise workers of potential or actual dangers in the workplace Take every precaution reasonable under the circumstances to protect workers ** The best way to ensure the above is to inspect work areas for hazards on a regular basis** WORKERS: Must report hazards that they have identified to their Supervisor.

6 Responsibilities related to workplace inspection:
RESPONSIBILITIES UNDER OHSA: JOINT HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEES (JHSC) (OHSA, Sec. 9) Responsibilities related to workplace inspection: Identify hazards and make recommendations to control them Obtain any information from the employer pertaining to health and safety Discuss health and safety matters at regular meetings Worker members shall inspect the physical condition of the workplace monthly - if not practical, inspect at least a part of the workplace in each month so that the entire workplace is inspected at least once per year NB: Worker JHSC member can designate another worker (non-JHSC) to perform inspections [Sec. 9(3.2)] Undertake the inspections in accordance with a schedule established by the committee Investigate critical injury or fatality cases Under the Act (Sec 9), Joint Health & Safety Committees (JHSCs) have certain responsibilities related to workplace inspection: Identify hazards and make recommendations to control them Obtain any information from the employer pertaining to health and safety Discuss health and safety matters at regular meetings Worker members shall inspect the physical condition of the workplace monthly - if not practical, inspect at least a part of the workplace in each month so that the entire workplace is inspected at least once per year Note: Worker JHSC member can designate another worker (non-JHSC) to perform inspections as long as the designated worker has received training [Sec. 9(3.2)] Undertake the inspections in accordance with a schedule established by the committee Investigate critical injury or fatality cases Under the Act, the employer must respond to written recommendations from the JHSC within 21 days. If the employer agrees, he must provide a timetable for action. If the employer disagrees, then he must provide reasons why.

7 YORK UNIVERSITY’S JOINT HEALTH AND SAFETY COMMITTEES
There are five JHSCs at York University: York University Staff Association (YUSA) CUPE Local 3903 CUPE Local 1356, and York University Faculty Association (YUFA) IUOE (Int’l Union of Operating Engineers) The following Employee group has a Health & Safety Representative: YUELI ( York University English Language Institute) H&S Rep’s have similar responsibilities as JHSC Members. Health & Safety Officers: Coordinate the area workplace inspections There are five Joint Health & Safety Committees at York University: York University Staff Association (YUSA) representing York University Staff CUPE Local 3903-representing contract Faculty, Teaching Assistants, Graduate Assistants CUPE Local 1356, and representing members from Maintenance, Custodial Services, Grounds, Security, Parking &Transportation York University Faculty Association (YUFA) representing York Faculty members IUOE (International Union of Operating Engineering) The committees range in size from 10 to 20 members, representing management and workers. For an update list of Committee members, please visit DOHS website at There is also one Health and Safety Representative at York University, who represent York University English Language Institute-(YUELI) employee group. H&S Rep’s have similar responsibilities as JHSC workers members. In addition to the JHSCs and H & S Rep, York University has area Health and Safety Officers that are a primary contact with DOHS. Health and Safety Officers coordinate health and safety training, resolve concerns of the JHSC, distribute health and safety information and material to their areas, and coordinate the area workplace inspections. An updated list of HSOs is also available on DOHS website at:

8 WHY ARE WORKPLACE INSPECTIONS IMPORTANT?
What is an inspection? What is the purpose of an inspection? Why are inspections important? An inspection is a physical monitoring of the workplace conducted to locate and report existing and potential hazards able to cause accidents. The purpose of the workplace inspection is to prevent injuries by identifying existing and potential hazards, determine underlying causes of hazards, and controlling the hazard by applying measures such as engineering controls, wearing protective equipment etc. Workplace inspections enable the employer/supervisor to prove due diligence in identifying hazards and taking corrective action.

9 PLANNING AND CONDUCTING THE INSPECTION
WHAT IS EXAMINED? Who, what, where, when and how Entire workplace, including storage areas, locker rooms, etc. Workplace elements (e.g., physical environment, equipment, process, etc.) Think about the types of hazards present in a workplace Use a floor plan for large areas Refer to previous inspection reports, if available Bring a checklist There are a number of elements involved in Planning and Conducting workplace inspections: First, determine: Who is going to conduct the inspection-Is it going to be only yourself or you plan to involve other people e.g. area supervisor/team leader, a staff member, the area health & safety officer? What are you going to inspect? Is it going to be the whole area you supervise or some part of it? Where is the inspection going to take place? location/area When do you plan to start the inspection; Date/Time How are you going to conduct the inspection? Will you be bringing along documentation such as a checklist, equipment/chemical inventory (if applicable), floor plan etc? Pay particular attention to items that most likely develop unsafe conditions due to stress, wear, impact, heat, cold, vibration, or misuse Include areas including storage, locker rooms. Due to size of area, it may not be possible to inspect entire workplace during one inspection Look at workplace elements, including environmental and physical condition (noise, vibration, lighting, temperature, ventilation, etc.) Equipment – materials tools, apparatus Process – how a worker interacts with the other elements

10 SCHEDULING Should be done during normal working hours;
“Planned” or “scheduled” inspections should be done at least annually – if the work area is very large then it should be broken up such that at least a part of the workplace is inspected (i.e., monthly, bi-monthly); Otherwise, be observant for hazards on a daily basis; The time required is dependent on complexity of the work area; Laboratory/shop/maintenance/facility areas may require more detailed inspections than office areas; During the inspection, contact an employee who can provide relevant information about the area and contribute any existing concerns/issues, if possible. The inspections should be conducted during normal working hours to observe employees performing their tasks. “Planned” or “scheduled” inspections should be done at least annually; planned means a pre-set date and area has been selected. For large areas, inspections must be done more frequently e.g. monthly in order to complete the whole area at the end of the year. The time needed for the inspection depends on the complexity of the work area. Laboratory/shop/maintenance and other facility areas may require more detailed inspections than office areas; During the inspection, it is important to involve the employees (if possible), so that they can provide relevant information about the hazards in the area and/or any existing concerns/issues. A Guideline on the Workplace Inspection developed by DOHS is a resource tool for anyone conducting workplace inspection. The Guideline is available on DOHS website under “Programs”, and can be accessed through:

11 CONDUCTING THE INSPECTION
WHAT KIND OF INFORMATION IS HELPFUL FOR COMPLETING AN INSPECTION REPORT? A. Diagram of Area B. Equipment inventory C. Chemical Inventory D. Checklist Checklists available on DOHS website: Documents that help to complete an inspection report include: -A diagram of the floor plan of the area -Equipment inventory and/or manufacturer’s manuals pertaining to a specific equipment/machinery -Chemical inventory and Material Safety Data Sheets to recognize different types of chemical hazards -Checklists, which help to ensure items are not missed or ensure items listed are inspected, allow easy recording and comments Sample of checklists can be found on DOHS website:

12 Observations during the inspection:
Look for deviations from accepted work practices (do not use for discipline) Talk to the employees Follow these basic principles: Draw attention to any immediate danger; Clearly describe each hazard and its location on checklist as it is found to avoid forgetting; Record what you have and haven’t inspected in case the inspection is interrupted. During the inspections, look for deviations from accepted work practices. Examples of these deviations may include: standing on chairs to reach high shelves; overloading of book shelves; the worker handling chemicals without safety glasses or gloves etc. -Talk to the employees about these unsafe work practices. Draw attention to any immediate danger to ensure corrective action is taken. -Clearly describe each hazard and its location on the checklist when it is found to avoid forgetting; -Record what you have and haven’t inspected in case the inspection is interrupted.

13 The Inspection Report State exactly what has been observed and accurately identify its location. Assign a priority level, for example; A = major – requires immediate action B = serious – requires short-term action C = requires long-term action Take immediate action as needed. When permanent correction takes time, take temporary measures, such as roping off area, tagging out equipment or posting warning signs. Once hazards and their location have been identified, assigning a priority level for each hazard will assist in setting timelines for corrective action. The priority level of actions is based on a risk assessment of the severity, frequency and probability of the hazards in causing injury or exposure; for example: A = high risk – requires immediate action B = moderate – requires short-term action C = low risk-requires long-term action Take immediate action if necessary –e.g. if a machine guard is removed. Where a permanent solution takes longer time to complete, consider temporary measures such as roping off area, tagging out equipment or posting warning signs.

14 FOLLOW UP AFTER THE INSPECTION
Discuss findings with area Manager if required or take immediate corrective action. If unsafe acts are discovered, explain hazards to the worker and/or supervisor as appropriate and advise on corrective action. Ask for an update from area supervisor or worker upon resolution of the problem. Give a written deadline for the resolution. The follow up after the inspection includes: -Discussing findings with area Manager if required or take immediate corrective action. -If unsafe acts are discovered, explain hazards to the worker and/or supervisor as appropriate and advise on corrective action. -Ask for an update from area supervisor or worker upon resolution of the problem. Give a written deadline for the resolution.

15 EXAMPLE OF AN INSPECTION REPORT
Inspection Location:___________________Date of Inspection:______________ Inspector(s) Name: ________________Dept/Areas covered:________________ Name of Employee(s) Contacted:______________________________________ Observations For Future Follow-up Item & Location Hazard Observed Repeat Item? Y/N Priority A/B/C Recommended Action Person Responsible Action Taken Date of -This is an example of a blank inspection report form. It includes information about the inspection such as: The inspection location/building, department or area, date/time, inspector’s name, and accompanying employees, if any. -Next, enter the observations made during the inspection: Item & Location inspected; Hazard Observed; Is it a Repeat Item? Yes or No; What is its Priority level-Is it A/B or C; What are recommended actions to correct the hazard; For follow up action, indicate: Who is the Person Responsible; Indicate the Actions Taken and what date were they taken. -Check previous inspections reports to find out if the hazard noticed is a repeat item. -Ask the persons who will follow up with the recommendations to submit a copy of the report with actions taken. -Keep records of inspection reports.

16 Types of General Hazards
HAZARD TYPE EXAMPLES Safety hazards: Inadequate machine guards, defective equipment. Unsafe workplace conditions (e.g., overloading, etc.). Unsafe work practices (e.g., operating equipment without training/orientation, not wearing PPE, etc.). Biological hazards: (viruses, bacteria, fungi, parasites) Mould (e.g., water damage on carpet, ceiling tile, dry wall, etc.). Rodents (e.g., dead mice). Chemical hazards: Caused by solid, liquid, vapour, gas, dust, fume, mist (e.g., welding in an open area, using industrial cleaning solvents, not working in the fumehood, etc.). Ergonomic hazards: Caused by demands on worker, such as repetitive and forceful movements, vibration, awkward postures arising from improper work methods or improperly designed workstations, tools or equipment. Physical hazards: Caused by noise, vibration, heat, cold, electricity, radiation, pressure, lighting, etc. Hazards found in the workplace can be classified into the following major types: Safety hazards: Examples: Inadequate machine guards, defective equipment, Unsafe workplace conditions (e.g., overloading, etc.), Unsafe work practices such as operating equipment without training/orientation, not wearing PPE, etc.). Biological hazards: Examples include: Mould due to water damage on carpet, ceiling tile, dry wall, etc.); rodents (e.g., dead mice). Chemical hazards: Hazardous solid, liquid, vapour, gas, dust, fume, mist such as welding in an open area, using industrial cleaning solvents, not working in the fumehood, etc.). Ergonomic hazards: Such as repetitive and forceful movements, vibration, awkward postures arising from improper work methods or improperly designed workstations, tools or equipment. Physical hazards: Such as noise, vibration, heat, cold, electricity, radiation, pressure, lighting, etc.

17 Examples of Office Hazards
Examples of office hazards as shown in this slide include (starting from the right top corner): Tripping hazard: the presence of a cord lying on the floor-walkway Possible solutions to eliminate the hazard and prevent a potential accident are: temporarily taping the cord or permanently-installing a new outlet Ergonomic hazards caused by: repetitive awkward posture: holding the phone with neck and shoulder causing possible neck pain Solution is: the use of a speakerphone or headset Improper way of lifting a box: Solution: no high heels, knees bend close to each other, keep arms close to the body and back straight Note: There is a Back Safety Training offered by DOHS to York University employees: Refer to the DOHS Training Schedule for date/time when these sessions are offered. Fall hazard: Standing on the chair to reach a frame on the wall or using a chair to reach and get a box from the top of the file cabinet Solution: Use a proper ladder or step stool

18 DON’T LET THIS OCCUR IN YOUR OFFICE
DON’T LET THIS OCCUR IN YOUR OFFICE. REMOVE HAZARDS BEFORE THEY BECOME ACCIDENTS. Other examples of office hazards include: Overloading: Shelf overloaded with binders/books Tripping hazard: File cabinet drawer left open Tripping hazard: cord across the floor, also here: carrying a big box obstructing vision Slipping hazard: Floor wet due to a water spill Solution: Clean the spill immediately or place warning sign while waiting for custodial staff to clean.

19 -What is wrong with this picture
-What is wrong with this picture? Are there any issues with the shelving? The shelf seems overloaded and there is no side stoppers installed on the shelf to hold binders from falling. Housekeeping item: boxes improperly stored (left on the floor) .

20 Examples of Office Hazards
Additional information on office hazards is found on the DOHS web page under “Office Safety”: Falls from chairs Filing cabinet hazards Office safety Slips and Falls Wall mounted shelving Also, there is a “Scented Products” bulletin. Additional information on office hazards such as: Falls from chairs Filing cabinet hazards Office safety Slips and Falls Wall mounted shelving is found on the DOHS web page under “Office Safety”. There is also a “Scented Products” bulletin that provides information and advice on how to deal with concerns involving the use of scented products in the workplace.

21 Safety Inspection Report
Sample Office Workplace Inspection Form FACULTY OF ARTS Safety Inspection Report Employee Contacted: Building: Responsible Person: Department: Union Rep: Date: Room: Inspectors: Furniture and Shelving Corrective Action (by Lab supervisor or Admin. Assistant unless otherwise noted) 1 Desk chairs - in poor state of repair Contact Furnishings Coordinator x55777 2 Desks, broken hardware representing cutting hazard Submit a Service/Work Request to Maintenance -This is a sample of an office inspection report, which can be used and adjusted to the needs of your Faculty/department. 3 Desks, obstacle, needs to be moved Submit a Service/Work Request to Maintenance 4 Partition walls not secured properly 5 File cabinets not balanced properly 6 File cabinets not loaded properly Have office occupant reload cabinet

22 Examples of Laboratory Hazards
Look for visual clues that a problem exists Use all your senses – what strikes you right away? Poor housekeeping; Unsecured gas cylinders; Unlabelled containers; Storing chemicals in the fume hoods and blocking baffles; Unsafe work practices: e.g. mouth pipetting, not working in the fumehood (when it is required), not using PPE, etc.) Laboratories due to the type of work activities pose a higher safety risk than an office environment. Examples of lab hazards include: Poor housekeeping; Unsecured gas cylinders; Unlabelled containers; Storing chemicals in the fume hoods and blocking baffles; Unsafe work practices: e.g. mouth pipetting, not working in the fumehood (when it is required), not using PPE, etc.

23 Examples of Laboratory Hazards
Additional hazards are found on the DOHS web page under “Programs”: Centrifuge explosions Compressed gas regulator maintenance Ethidium bromide Gloves Mercury thermometers Peroxide forming chemicals Also, include general office hazards such as Slips and Falls, Filing cabinet hazards, Wall mounted shelving. Information on additional laboratory hazards is found on the DOHS web page under “Programs”. Such hazards include: Centrifuge explosions Compressed gas regulator maintenance Ethidium bromide Gloves Mercury thermometers Peroxide forming chemicals And more generally, Slips and Falls, Filing cabinet hazards, Wall mounted shelving.

24 Example of a Laboratory Inspection Report:
Item: Yes No N/A Corrective Action Follow Up Door signs posted with contact personnel Update door sign Emergency numbers posted by telephone Post emergency no. Personnel are WHMIS trained Register employee for training with DOHS MSDSs available for all chemicals Obtain MSDS Chemical Inventory for all hazardous materials Develop inventory.Contact DOHS for advice. Personal Protective Equipment present and used: Laboratory coats Enforce policy or order PPE from Stores Gloves Safety glasses/goggles/face shield Other (apron, respirator, ear plugs etc.) Safety equipment present and in working condition: Emergency shower (within 100 ft.) Contact FPC (ext.22401) or check with DOHS Emergency eye-wash Contact FPC or refill eyewash bottle Fumehood uncluttered and sash at correct height Clear fumehood and check sash Spill kits readily available Order from Science Stores Fire extinguishers present and fully charged Contact Fire Prevention (ext.77290) This is an example of a laboratory inspection report with the findings and corrective measures recommended. A Guideline and a complete inspection laboratory checklist can be found on DOHS website under “Programs”.

25 Example of an Inspection Report: Continued Please refer to attached complete checklist
Item: Yes No N/A Corrective Action Follow Up Chemical Storage: All containers of hazardous materials are labelled Label containers Gas cylinders are secured and capped Chain or secured containers. Cover with cap. Chemicals are stored on shelves/ in cabinets Place chemicals on shelves/cabinets or obtain quote from FPC (obtain service request from from FPC website) If Peroxides are present, have they been tested Refer to procedure on DOHS website and test Chemicals are stored & separated by class e.g. Acids stored separately from alkalis Separate chemicals Large containers are on low shelves Relocate containers to lower shelves Electrical Hazards: All electrical equipment is grounded and have Power-off switches Contact Maintenance (ext.22401) or Electronics Shop (ext.33841, 77697) Multiplug adapters are fitted with circuit breakers Contact Maintenance (ext.22401) Electrical power cords are in good condition Replace cord or contact Electronics Shop (ext.33841, 77697) Once hazards are identified, a risk assessment is carried out to determine the risk level. The higher the risk level, the higher the priority for corrective action.

26 Items to review during the lab inspection:
Are Material Safety Data Sheets available for the chemicals present within the lab? Have lab users received WHMIS II training? Is personal protective equipment (PPE) available, in good condition and worn properly? Can a person exit the lab quickly without tripping over objects, cracks, holes, missing tiles? Are lab refrigerators and freezers used for the storage of food or drink? Have laboratory personnel been specifically trained for the apparatus and agents being used? Items to review during lab inspection include: Are up-to-date Material Safety Data Sheets available for the chemicals present in the lab? Have lab users received WHMIS II training? Is personal protective equipment available, in good condition and worn properly? Can a person exit the lab quickly without tripping over objects, cracks, holes, missing tiles? Are lab refrigerators and freezers used for the storage of food or drink? Have laboratory personnel been specifically trained for the apparatus and agents being used?

27 Items to review during the lab inspection (continued):
Are safety showers, eyewash stations, first aid kits, fire extinguisher, and spill kits; readily accessible? Look for damaged or cluttered extension cords; Look for chemical concerns: Are there any chemicals that have expired? Are bonding cables used when dispensing flammable liquids? Are wastes labelled with a hazardous waste label? Are fume hoods in good working order; Are compressed gases properly stored? Other items that should be looked at during lab inspection are: Look for the nearest safety showers, eyewash stations, first aid kits, fire extinguisher, and spill kits; Look for damaged or cluttered extension cords; Look for chemical concerns-Examples: -Are there any chemicals that have expired? -Are bonding cables used when dispensing flammable liquids? -Are wastes properly labelled and disposed of? Are fume hoods in good working order; Are compressed gases properly stored? Are needles/syringes secured? Are Fire extinguishers checked by York Fire Prevention officers?

28 All the labs using hazardous materials should have a spill kit (the size will depend on the quantity of chemicals used) to deal with spill emergencies. There are also large spill kits located in areas such as in Science buildings (Petrie and Farquharson Stores, Lumbers Rm 112 etc.) General spill kits are available and can be purchased from Science Stores in Petrie & Farquharson Buildings. More information on the type of spill kits, their content can be found in the WHMIS Program available on DOHS website.

29 Fumehoods should not be used for chemical storage
Fumehoods should not be used for chemical storage. Materials stacked inside of the fume hood can interfere with baffles, reducing ventilation.

30 Laboratory fire extinguisher, eye wash station and first aid kit shall be checked regularly to ensure proper maintenance.

31 Compressed gas cylinders shall always be secured with a chain or a strap.

32 Plant, Workshop and Studio Inspections
Other areas Inspected: Physical plant Workshops Studios Other areas that need to be inspected include: Physical plant Workshops Studios

33 Examples of Plant/Shop/Studio Hazards:
Look for visual clues that a problem exists Use all your senses – what strikes you right away? Look for deviations from accepted work practices such as: Removing guards or rendering them ineffective; Using defective equipment/machinery; Using compressed air to clean clothes; Tripping hazards; Poor housekeeping; Not using PPE, etc. When plants/shops//studios are inspected look for deviations from accepted work practices such as: Removing guards or rendering them ineffective; Using defective equipment/machinery; Using compressed air to clean clothes; Tripping hazards; Poor housekeeping: Are work surfaces clean and in good repair; Are aisles clear? Not wearing personal protective equipment etc.).

34 Examples of Plant/Shop/Studio Hazards: (continued)
Waste disposed of properly Ladders/High reach equipment Machinery and tools, including guarding Chemicals and gas cylinders Vehicles inspection/maintenance Lifting Equipment Other items that should be looked at during the inspection are: Is the waste disposed of safely and properly? Are ladders/other high reach equipment maintained and used properly? Are elevated work areas provided with guardrails; ladders are not used to increase height in lifting equipment Are tools guarded or locked out? Are operators trained to use the equipment Are pits and floor openings covered or guarded? Are chemicals labeled, cylinders secured ? Are users of chemicals trained on WHMIS? Are Material Safety Data Sheets up to date and available to workers? Are vehicles regularly inspected and maintained? Are lifting devices labelled with load capacity and inspected annually?

35 Safety Inspection Checklist
(Example): AISLEWAYS AND PASSAGEWAYS EXPLANATORY NOTES AND COMMENTS Clear and unobstructed. No storage of flammables/combustibles in aisles. Aisle ways at least 44 inches wide. Where forklift trucks used, traffic aisles must have a clearance of 30 centimeters (12 inches) on each side of a loaded truck. Passageways with sufficient width for all normal movements. Appropriate clearance around moving parts of machinery and materials being handled. INGRESS AND EGRESS: EXITS Exits and exit signs adequately illuminated. Exit signs must be clean, clearly visible and legible. Exits unobstructed. Exit doors must not be blocked or wedged in the open position. Flammable and combustible materials stored away from exits. All materials must be properly labelled and stored according to the MSDS, away from all points of ingress/egress. WORK AT HEIGHTS EXPLANATORY NOTES AND COMMENTS Full body harness must be worn when exposed to hazard of falling and secured with a lifeline to a designated anchor point at heights above 3 m. Has everyone been trained in fall prevention? Prior to each use, the user must inspect all equipment. -A sample of a safety inspection form along with additional comments is provided in this slide. Some items may not be applicable to all areas.

36 The pictures in this slide show examples of hazards/unsafe conditions found in plants/shops/studios:
From the right top corner- Sprinkler system has been activated due to the storage of materials/boxes too high touching the sprinkler Fall hazard: A worker uses a forklift instead of a ladder to reach up high to fix something Fall/trip hazard: Improper loading blocking vision Possible injury due to falling materials from inappropriately stored and overcrowding in the janitorial storage closet Damage of forklift and possibility for injury of the operator due to the attempt to lift material heavier or more than load capacity of the forklift Fall hazard: Forklift operator almost falling because of backing up unsafely

37 Potential exposure/injury during welding because no proper personal protective equipment is worn
An accidental spill and fire has activated the sprinkler system Trip hazard- the custodial worker is falling because of the buffing machine cord Potential injury: Guarding is missing on the table saw and no personal protective equipment is worn Potential injury due to a flying cylinder because they are being transported not secured, and Potential exposure to harmful chemicals, no gloves and other personal protective equipment are worn

38 -All fire exit doors shall always be clear of obstruction: Pipe access panel had been removed and placed on the floor interfering with the door.…

39 -Compressed gas cylinders not in use shall be chained, capped, labelled and segregated (full vs. empty) and stored at the designated cylinder storage areas.

40 -An un-mounted fire extinguisher: Fire extinguishers shall be mounted on the wall.
-Drums containing flammable liquids should be grounded to prevent static buildup and possibility of a fire.

41 -A flammable material storage cabinet: Flammable materials shall be stored in fire proof cabinets.

42 Workplace Inspection Training
THANK YOU! REMEMBER: TO BE CONSIDERED TRAINED, YOU ARE REQUIRED TO COMPLETE: Workplace Inspection Training QUIZ Thank you for taking web-based Workplace Inspection Training. To be considered trained, you are now required to complete Workplace Inspection Training Quiz. To do so, please click on the link provided. GOOD LUCK!


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