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Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Chapter 37 Patient Reception.

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Presentation on theme: "Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Chapter 37 Patient Reception."— Presentation transcript:

1 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Chapter 37 Patient Reception

2 2 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Pretest 1.The first thing the medical assistant does when opening the office is to unlock the file cabinets, medical record files, and medicine cabinets. 2.After opening the office, the medical assistant should be sure that the telephones are switched to the day message or call the answering service. 3.An electronic task system consists of a folder for each month and a folder for each day. 4.Medical records are usually pulled the evening before the appointment. 5.A radio, CD player, television, or DVD player is usually turned on in the morning before patients arrive. True or False

3 3 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Pretest, cont. 6.The autoclave is often run just before closing the medical office so that instruments can dry overnight. 7.Only one person should be permitted to stand at the reception desk at a time. 8.A new patient must sign a form acknowledging receipt of HIPAA privacy practices. 9.Only the top side of the insurance card must be photocopied. 10.If a patient has managed care insurance, a referral form may be required to see a physician other than the primary care provider. True or False

4 4 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Preparing for Patients 1.Duties of first person in the office: a.Disarm the alarm system b.Turn on the lights c.Unlock the door through which patients enter d.Unlock file cabinets, medical records files, and medicine cabinets e.Turn on all of the office equipment that will be used Opening and Closing the Medical Office

5 5 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Checking for Messages and/or Faxes 1.Duties to prepare telephone system for the days activities: a.Switch from the night/weekend message to the day message on the voice mail system b.If office uses an answering service, need to notify service that office is open Preparing for Patients, cont.

6 6 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Preparing for Patients, cont. 2.Checking for faxes that have arrived overnight a.Route to the appropriate person b.Make sure fax machine has adequate amount of paper 3.Retrieve messages from a separate prescription request mailbox

7 7 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Preparing for Patients, cont. Preparing for the Days Activities 1.Review the days tasks 2.Note any deviations from normal routine 3.Prepare manual day sheet if it will be used 4.Review electronic task system or tickler file a.Tickler file is set of 12 folders (one for each month) plus 31 additional folders (one for each day of the month b.Contains notes, bills to be paid, other items for the day when it must be handled

8 8 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Preparing for Patients, cont. Making Sure Patient Charts Are Prepared 1.Patient charts are usually pulled the evening before the appointment 2.Charts are arranged with an appointment schedule for each physician 3.A charge slip is printed for each person and placed with the record a.May be printed when charts are pulled b.May be printed when the patient arrives

9 9 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Preparing for Patients, cont. 4.Appointment schedules are updated as patients are added 5.Appointment schedule printed for each physician and placed throughout the office 6.Charts are usually kept at the front desk until the patient arrives

10 10 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Preparing for Patients, cont. Checking the Office and Waiting Room 1.Waiting room should be checked for: a.Cleanliness b.Neatness c.Correct temperature

11 11 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Preparing for Patients, cont. Neat and Tidy Waiting Room

12 12 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Preparing for Patients, cont. 2.Television, radio, and/or DVD player in waiting room should be turned on 3.Any toys in childrens play area are cleaned regularly 4.Holders for patient information brochures are tidied and restocked

13 13 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Preparing for Patients, cont. Checking Equipment and Supplies 1.Office should be checked visually for safety 2.Fill paper trays of copier and printer 3.Check examination rooms and restock as needed 4.Turn on equipment in laboratory as needed and run controls 5.Unload autoclave if it was used the night before

14 14 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Preparing for Patients, cont. 1.Autoclave may be run and medical records pulled at the end of the day a.Allows instruments to dry overnight b.Gives more time in the morning 2.Make backup copy of main computer hard drive as needed Closing the Medical Office

15 15 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Preparing for Patients, cont. 3.Other duties are reverse of opening the office: a.Turn off all equipment except fax machine and telephones b.Change telephone system to night message and/or call answering service c.Lock the door through which patients enter d.Lock file cabinets, medical record files, and medication cabinets e.Make sure kitchen equipment is turned off f.Turn off lights 4.Alarm system is set as the last person leaves

16 16 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In 1.Important to acknowledge each person who enters the office as soon as possible a.Prevents person from feeling awkward b.Sign-in sheet should have adhesive peel-off strips to preserve confidentiality

17 17 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In, cont. 1.Sliding glass window prevents people in the waiting room from hearing telephone conversations, etc., in the reception area 2.If open desk, medical assistant (MA) avoids conversation with patient when another patient is at the desk 3.Only one patient at the reception desk at a time 4.If information provided is sensitive, patient is taken to private area Maintaining Confidentiality

18 18 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In, cont. 1.Forms completed and/or signed by a new patient a.Personal and insurance information (if not already recorded) b.Consent for treatment/release of information form c.Form authorizing assignment of benefits Payment will go directly to the office New Patients

19 19 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In, cont. Sample New Patient Information Form

20 20 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In, cont. Acknowledgement of Receipt of HIPAA Privacy Practices 1.New patient is given a copy of the notice of office privacy practices 2.New patient signs a form acknowledging receipt of notice of privacy practices 3.If office policy, new patient signs a general form consenting to release of information

21 21 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In, cont. Sample Acknowledgement of Receipt of HIPAA Privacy Practice

22 22 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In, cont. Optional Consent for Disclosure of Protected Health Information

23 23 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In, cont. Patient History Form 1.New patient fills out a history form before seeing the physician 2.May be mailed to the patient or given before the first visit

24 24 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In, cont. Verifying Insurance and Obtaining Authorizations 1.Photocopy both sides of the insurance card 2.Some insurance companies require authorizations every time the patient sees the primary care physician a.Medicaid patients usually have to be verified and/or receive prior authorization for each visit Medicaid is an insurance program established by the federal government Medicaid pays for low-income patients medical needs Medicaid patients can be verified by card reader, telephone, or fax

25 25 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In, cont. Card Reader to Verify Insurance

26 26 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In, cont. b.Other types of insurance may necessitate calling the patients insurance company to obtain authorization for treatment c.Call if there is a question about whether the insurance will cover the visit before patient is seen

27 27 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In, cont. Verifying a Managed Care Referral 1.For physician other than primary care provider, a paper or electronic referral form may be required 2.Referral form will state how many visits are allowed

28 28 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In, cont. 3.Referral form will state problem for which the patient is being referred 4.If a referral, must accept what insurance pays 5.If not covered by insurance or no referral form, patient must be informed of responsibility for bill

29 29 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In, cont. 1.Verify that billing information is correct each time patient visits the office 2.Update information when there are any changes Established Patients

30 30 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In, cont. 1.Copayment is a fixed amount of money that the patient is required to pay each time he or she receives medical treatment 2.Amount is usually printed on the patients insurance card 3.Copayment may be collected before the visit because it is a fixed fee 4.Patient is given a receipt for copayment and amount is recorded on patients charge slip Accepting Copayments

31 31 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In, cont. Indicating That the Patient Is in the Waiting Room 1.After patient has been checked in, medical record is placed in designated space 2.Patient placed in examination room when one is free 3.Forms are inserted in the medical record or scanned into an electronic medical record

32 32 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Patient Check-In, cont. 4.Charge slip is usually attached to front of medical record or routing slip 5.Physician will complete the charge slip 6.Patient information is checked and/or added in the computer

33 33 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Orienting Patients to the Medical Office 1.Brief description of the physicians and information about them 2.How long each physician has been in practice 3.Each physicians credentials 4.Which physicians are accepting new patients Information for New or Prospective Patients

34 34 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Orienting Patients to the Medical Office, cont. 5.Specialties of each physician in the office 6.Information about languages spoken 7.Location of the main office and satellite offices a.Directions to office(s) b.Information about parking c.Information about access to public transportation, if applicable

35 35 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Orienting Patients to the Medical Office, cont. 8.Types of insurance that the practice accepts 9.Payment policy 10.How far in advance to make appointments and policy on canceling appointments 11.Call-in times or when the physician will return calls 12.What hospitals and/or nursing homes the physician is affiliated with 13.How medication refills are handled

36 36 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Orienting Patients to the Medical Office, cont. 1.Some doctors may not be accepting patients a.They already have as many patients as they can handle b.They have been out on leave c.They are planning to retire If Physicians Arent Accepting New Patients

37 37 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Orienting Patients to the Medical Office, cont. 1.Tell patients how much time to allow for the visit 2.Remind patients to bring all medications to an initial visit Instructions for First Appointment

38 38 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Orienting Patients to the Medical Office, cont. Case Study for Discussion Donna Pohl calls the office to ask about the medical practice. An acquaintance has recommended Dr. Sylvia Lawrence. She says that she prefers a female physician. She asks for information about her and her specialty. Dr. Lawrence specializes in general internal medicine. At the current time she is pregnant, and her due date is 1 month away.

39 39 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Orienting Patients to the Medical Office, cont. Although Dr. Lawrence is still seeing established patients, she has instructed Keisha not to make any appointments for her with new patients for the next 3 months. The other physician in the practice, Dr. William Rudner, also specializes in general internal medicine.

40 40 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Orienting Patients to the Medical Office, cont. 1.Many offices have an information booklet or brochure 2.Important to keep booklet up to date 3.Patient information booklets are very successful marketing tools Patient Information Booklet

41 41 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Orienting Patients to the Medical Office, cont. 1.HIPAA regulations are not specific about sign-in lists a.If possible, other patients should not know who is in the waiting room b.Sign-in lists with peel-off labels are recommended to minimize time that name is visible c.When staff calls the patient, name is removed from the list Protecting Patient Confidentiality during Check-in

42 42 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Orienting Patients to the Medical Office, cont. d.Silent wireless paging systems are available e.Patients may indicate seat position on a chart at the desk to avoid having to call their name 2.Computer screens should be turned so that patients at the reception desk cannot see them 3.Shredder should be located at front desk to destroy any notes with patient names that are not saved

43 43 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Posttest 1.As soon as the medical assistant has opened the office, he or she usually runs the autoclave. 2.After opening the office, the medical assistant should check the fax machine for faxes that may have arrived overnight. 3.A tickler file is used to remind the medical assistant of tasks to be done on a specific day. 4.The first major task for the medical assistant in the morning is to pull the medical records for all patients to be seen that day. 5.Holders for patient information brochures are often located in the waiting room. True or False

44 44 Elsevier items and derived items © 2009 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. Posttest, cont. 6.The medical assistant turns off all equipment as the last thing when closing the office. 7.A sliding glass window between the waiting room and reception desk helps maintain patient confidentiality. 8.A new patient must sign a form providing consent for treatment and release of information. 9.Insurance companies usually require authorization every time the patient sees the primary care physician. 10.If the patient has a copayment, it is usually collected before the patient sees the physician. True or False


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