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Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments. BHARP Behavioral Health Alliance of Rural Pennsylvania BHARP was established in the Fall of 2006. It is comprised.

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Presentation on theme: "Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments. BHARP Behavioral Health Alliance of Rural Pennsylvania BHARP was established in the Fall of 2006. It is comprised."— Presentation transcript:

1 Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments

2 BHARP Behavioral Health Alliance of Rural Pennsylvania BHARP was established in the Fall of It is comprised of County Mental Health Administrators, Human Service Directors and Single County Authorities from 23 counties in Northcentral PA. The purpose of the BHARP is to allow the 23 counties in the Northcentral region to participate in the implementation and monitoring of the Department of Public Welfare contract with Community Care Behavioral Health for the provision of Health Choices in this zone. In partnership with Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (OMHSAS) and Bureau of Drug and Alcohol Programs (BDAP) and in collaboration with other stakeholders, BHARP works to ensure that a comprehensive, responsive, unified, cost-effective, recovery oriented behavioral health system of care is available within the 23 county region. Administrative functions for the BHARP are performed by the Behavioral Health Administrative Unit or BHAU. The BHAU is operated by a private not-for-profit organization, Service Access Management, Inc. (SAM Inc.). Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments

3 Erie Crawford Mercer Lawrence Beaver Washington Greene Fayette Allegheny Westmoreland Butler Armstrong Clarion Venango Forest Warren McKean Potter Cameron Elk Jefferson Clearfield Indiana Cambria Somerset Bedford Blair Centre Clinton Huntingdon Fulton Franklin Adams Cumberland Perry Mifflin Snyder Union Lycoming TiogaBradford Columbia Montou r Northum- berland Dauphin York Lancaster Chester Berks Lebanon Schuylkill Luzerne Wyoming Susquehanna Lackawanna Wayne Pike Monroe Carbon Lehigh Northampton Bucks Montgomery Delaware Philadelphia Juniata Behavioral Health Alliance of Rural Pennsylvania (BHARP) North Central HealthChoices State Option Zone Sullivan Average covered lives (January 2011-June 2011): 154,175

4 Covered lives by County/Joinder/Region Bradford 9, 049 Sullivan 720 Bradford/Sullivan: 9,769 Tioga 5,616 Wayne 6,869 Northeast Region: 22,254 Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments Columbia 8,193 Montour 2,133 Snyder 4,394 Union4,030 CMSU: 18,750 Northumberland13,913 Schuylkill21,560 East Region: 54,223

5 Covered lives by County/Joinder/Region Centre 10,121 Huntingdon 6,778 Mifflin 7,771 Juniata 2714 HMJ:17, 263 Central Region: 27, 384 Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments Clarion 5,844 Clearfield 14,506 Jefferson 7,855 Clearfield/Jefferson 22,361 West Region: 28, 205

6 Covered lives by County/Joinder/Region Cameron 994 Elk 4,520 Cameron/Elk: 5,514 Potter 2,813 McKean 7,521 Forest652 Warren5,606 Forest/Warren: 6,258 Northwest Region 22, 106 Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments

7 Service Dates: April 1, 2011 through June 30, 2011

8 BHARP RECOVERY WORKGROUP The BHARP Recovery workgroup was formed in the Fall of 2007 to address the issue of recovery-orientation in our counties which is an identified priority of BHARP. The workgroup membership consists of County MH/MR Administrators, SCAs, other County staff, BHAU staff, Community Care network and quality staff, BDAP personnel, OMHSAS personnel, PRO-A staff, providers, individuals/families in services and other persons in recovery. One focus area has been to integrate the MH and D&A principles, strategies, values and language of recovery. Another focus is to incorporate the opportunities and challenges of providing recovery- oriented services in our rural counties. OUR PRIMARY PURPOSE IS TO PROMOTE AND SUPPORT THE ENHANCEMENT OF RECOVERY-ORIENTED ENVIRONMENTS WITHIN BHARP COUNTIES. Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments

9 Recovery Workgroup Members Robert Fleming Cindy Zembryki CHIPP Consortium CoordinatorAdministrator Clearfield/JeffersonCameron/Elk Barbara Gorrell Mary Lyn Cadman SCA Administrator Quality Improvement Specialist Columbia/Montour/Snyder/Union (CMSU)CMSU Behavioral Health Bonnie Tolerico Susan FordExecutive Director Wayne County Drug and Alcohol CommissionClearfield/Jefferson Drug and Alcohol Commission Catherine Arbogast Trish Rosenstein SCA Administrator Vice President Business & Clinical Development Centre County MH/MR Drug and AlcoholBeacon Light Behavioral Health Chris Wysocki Tracy Mitchell AdministratorAssociate Quality Manager Juniata Valley Tri-County MH/MR ProgramCommunity Care Behavioral Health Huntington/Mifflin/Juniata

10 Recovery Workgroup Members Jeff Geibel Virginia L. Dikeman Drug and Alcohol Program SupervisorMental Health Program Representative Bureau of Drug and Alcohol ProgramsOffice of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services Jill PechtThanaaa Bey Clinical DirectorTraining Specialist Clear Concepts CounselingPRO-A Denise Moore FBMH Program Director Pam Killinger Cen-Clear Child Services Inc. Community Member Jen McLaughlin Genny Dailey Senior Program DirectorSpecial Projects Coordinator Community Services GroupBehavioral Health Administrative Unit (BHAU) Cheryl Floyd Executive Director Pennsylvania Recovery Organizations Alliance (PRO-A)

11 that behavioral health is essential to health – for individuals, families, and communities that prevention works, that treatment is effective, and that people can and do recover from mental health and substance use disorders. Source:

12 The Journey To Date Fall 2007: The workgroup was charged with defining the philosophy and identifying characteristics of a recovery oriented system of care. Winter 2007 – Spring 2009: Identified Common characteristics. Defined Philosophy Statement. Created Language Statement. April 2009-August 2009: Implemented a recovery survey to gauge the current recovery-orientation in the counties and to identify strengths and gaps. There were 400 responses from county offices and providers. Reviewed the recovery related questions on the Consumer/Family Satisfaction Team (CFST) surveys September 2009-January 2010: Recommendations & Goals were finalized. September 2011: Conference – Making Spiritual and Physical Health Connections October 2011 – December 2012: Wellness Campaign & Local Projects Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments

13 Common Characteristics of both MH and D&A Environments PRINCIPLES: Broad heterogeneity of populations and outcomes Focus on person and environment Long-term perspective Recovery is a process and a continuum Non linear process of recovery Family involvement is helpful Mutual support is crucial Spirituality may be a critical component of recovery Multiple pathways to recovery

14 Common Characteristics continued VALUES: Person-centered Partnerships Growth Choice Strengths perspective Focus on wellness and health Cultural diversity Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments

15 Common Characteristics continued STRATEGIES TO FACILITATE RECOVERY: Treatment as an array/menu of services Coordinated treatment Assertive linkages to communities of recovery Skills for valued roles On-going, flexible recovery-enhancing services Advocacy Cultural competency

16 Common Characteristics continued INGREDIENTS OF A RECOVERY-ORIENTED SYSTEM: · Prevention · Treatment · Rehabilitation· Mutual support · Vocational and educational supports· Spirituality · Community education and support· Enrichment · Family education and support· Legal aid · Basic support (housing, nutrition, income) · Protection and advocacy Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments

17 Recovery-oriented language is person-centered and not focused on a diagnostic label. Recovery-oriented language fosters hope and avoids stereotypical and stigmatizing terms. The ultimate goal of recovery-oriented language is to make contact with the person not their disease and to give every individual the value, respect, and dignity he/she deserves. BHARP recommends the following documents as resources on recovery-oriented language: IAPSRS Language Guidelines (2003) (available at PA D&A Coalition White Paper (2010) (available at - Resources)

18 Our Philosophy on the Journey of Recovery Recovery is a continuous lifelong process It requires linkages to recovery support services, natural supports and community supports Each individual self-directs his/her recovery journey Each individual has ownership of his/her recovery Recovery oriented environments provide: -Person-centered planning -Partnerships between individuals receiving services and those providing services -Linkages to community based supports

19 Our Philosophy on the Journey of Recovery Formal systems of care that are focused on recovery: - Actively welcome and engage people when and where they approach the system - Allow formal and natural supports to work together - Balance the management of treatment and the empowerment of the individual to maximize successful outcomes It is necessary to combine the best of the medical and recovery models of care It is necessary to bridge the gap between behavioral and physical health care delivery

20 This initiative reflects our intention to promote and to support the enhancement of recovery-oriented environments in all of our communities. Communities have always been an important part of rural life and we hope to strengthen those connections – creating relationships between the formal and informal networks of care. The vision is to nurture communities where individuals have the opportunity to attain and maintain health, wellness, and on-going recovery. The mission is to work towards the evolution and transformation of the behavioral healthcare system. It could be considered a Rural Call for Change. Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments

21 Information and resources Education and training opportunities Enrichment and partnership opportunities Technical assistance options Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments

22 Recommendations and Key Activities Recommendation #1: BHARP will develop and promote a shared understanding of recovery-oriented environments throughout the Drug and Alcohol and Mental Health systems. Distribute Recovery brochures – Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments and Recommendations & Goals (handouts) Provide information to local Boards/Advisory Councils, Committees and Coalitions, Advocacy groups, and Providers Promote on-going local dialogues between MH and D&A system stakeholders Establish the topics of health, wellness, and on-going recovery as regular agenda items at local meetings Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments

23 Recommendations and Key Activities Recommendation #2: BHARP will collect and provide access to information, tools and other resources on creating and maintaining recovery-oriented environments in rural areas. Create information clearinghouse on BHARP website Develop reference book on Prevention programs, Promising practices, and Evidenced-Based practices Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments

24 Recommendations and Key Activities Recommendation #3:BHARP will encourage the service system to work assertively with individuals to explore and to make connections with natural supports in their community which will assist individuals to attain recovery and to sustain on-going recovery. Provide information and education Create a resource manual Held 2011 Recovery Conference & are developing local projects Promote acceptance and work towards decreasing stigma and discrimination Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments

25 Recommendations and Key Activities Recommendation #4: BHARP will encourage the service system to work assertively to build linkages between an individuals behavioral and physical healthcare which will assist individuals to attain and maintain recovery and wellness. Create awareness through Wellness Campaign Provide information and education using SAMHSA Wellness Campaign tools Build resource manual for both behavioral healthcare providers and physical healthcare providers Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments

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27 Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments The BHARP Co-Occurring Disorders Project is having a teleconference with the Pennsylvania Certification Board to review the certification process. The Teleconference has been rescheduled for March 31st from 10:30am-11:30am. Please click here for more information. Work Groups and Projects The Behavioral Health Alliance of Rural Pennsylvania, established fall 2006, is comprised of County MH/MR Administrators, Human Service Directors and Single County Authorities from 23 counties in north central PA. The BHARP was formed upon request by the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfares Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. The primary purpose of the BHARP is to allow the 23 counties in the north central region to participate in the implementation and monitoring of DPWs contract with Community Care Behavioral Health for the provision of Health Choices in the north central zone. In partnership with OMHSAS and in collaboration with other stakeholders, BHARP works with OMHSAS and Community Care to ensure that a comprehensive, responsive, unified, cost-effective, recovery oriented behavioral health system of care is available within the 23 county region. copyright © 2009 BHARP

28 Promoting Recovery Oriented Environments


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