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Home Heating Oil Tank Presentation by Greg Babcock Universal Applicators, Inc. Version 20130327.

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Presentation on theme: "Home Heating Oil Tank Presentation by Greg Babcock Universal Applicators, Inc. Version 20130327."— Presentation transcript:

1 Home Heating Oil Tank Presentation by Greg Babcock Universal Applicators, Inc. Version

2 Why are Heating Oil Tanks an issue? Tank Deommissioning properly takes a Tank out of service. Leak Fill with Water Float in High Water Table Weaken and Collapse

3 Floating Gas Tanks

4 Whats left of 50 year old Tanks

5 Why are we called? 1.) Real Estate Transactions (More than all other reasons combined). 2.) Refinancing 3.) Failing Heating System (Water coming through a hole in the Tank or fuel is rapidly leaking out). 4.) Conversion to another Heat source. 5.) Due Diligence (Almost never) FOR SALE

6 Do I have a Heating Oil Tank? Signs to look for… 1. Vent Pipe Sometimes well hidden… 3. Fuel Lines in Basement 2. Fill Pipe

7 Do I have a Heating Oil Tank? Signs to look for… New lines… Indicates a past problem with the Heating System. Their remedy was to install new cooper lines. We know lines are new because original lines were iron and there is a patch in the floor. That didnt solve the problem so they converted to Gas and disconnected the lines. High probability that there is an abandoned leaking Tank on site. No Decommissioning paper trail.

8 Once the Tank is located… Soil Samples are acquired. TWO (2) soil samples taken at… No more than 6 inches from the opposite ends of the Tank & At ONE to TWO (2) feet below the Tank bottom.

9 Soil Sample Results Soil samples are reported as Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) measurements of parts per million (ppm). RESULTS: ND means-No Detection of TPH. 0 – 49ppm No DEQ reporting required. 50ppm and higher-requires reporting to the DEQ within 72 hours of discovery by either the Tank Owner or service provider. 50ppm – 500ppm will require a written DEQ report, but generally no physical cleanup action. Above 500ppm will require a cleanup action beyond a Decommissioning.

10 March 2000, the DEQ standardized the Decommissioning process by writing a set of procedures to follow, in order for the Decommissioning to be considered Certified. Oil Tank Decommissioning is still a voluntary process. Decommissionings did not always include Soil Samples. It was the customers option. Conversions in the past did not always include Decommissionings. Prior to March 2000: Often, customers were advised to fill Tanks with water to ballast them in place. A lot of out of service or abandoned Tanks remain with un-resolved issues.

11 March 2000, the DEQ standardized the Decommissioning process by writing a set of procedures to follow in order, for the Decommissioning to be considered Certified. Residential Tank Decommissioning rules are similar to Commercial Tank rules. Oil Tank Decommissioning is still a voluntary process.

12 Why a pump-out is not enough. Oily Sludge buildup over the years. Decommissioning Backfilled Tank is cleaned. Site Restored The Process of a standard Decommissioning

13 Decommissioning by Slurry-alternative Method

14 Are basement Tanks Decommissioned? Yes… But dont forget to remove the vent and fill pipes… This + Automatic Fill = Basement Spill

15 Soil Sample Results Soil samples are reported as Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) measurements of parts per million (ppm). RESULTS: ND means-No Detection of TPH. 0 – 49ppm No DEQ reporting required. 50ppm and higher-requires reporting to the DEQ within 72 hours of discovery by either the Tank Owner or service provider. 50ppm – 500ppm will require a written DEQ report, but generally no physical cleanup action. Above 500ppm will require a cleanup action beyond a Decommissioning.

16 DEQ Matrix Score Sheet Depth to Ground Water Less than 25 feet 25 to 50 feet 51 feet to 100 feet over 100 feet Mean Annual Precipitation Over 45 inches 20 to 45 inches less than 20 inches Native Soil Type Coarse Sands, Gravels Silts, fine Sands Clays Sensitivity to Uppermost Aquifer Sole Source Current Potable Future Potable Non Potable Potential Receptors Many, Near Medium Few, Far TOTAL Level 1: over 40 points requires a minimum cleanup level of 100 ppm Level 2: 25 to 40 points requires a minimum cleanup level of 500 ppm Level 3: under 25 points requires a minimum cleanup level of 1000 ppm

17 DEQ Matrix Score Sheet Depth to Ground Water Less than 25 feet 25 to 50 feet 51 feet to 100 feet over 100 feet Mean Annual Precipitation Over 45 inches 20 to 45 inches less than 20 inches Native Soil Type Coarse Sands, Gravels Silts, fine Sands Clays Sensitivity to Uppermost Aquifer Sole Source Current Potable Future Potable Non Potable Potential Receptors Many, Near Medium Few, Far TOTAL 37 Level 1: over 40 points requires a minimum cleanup level of 100 ppm Level 2: 25 to 40 points requires a minimum cleanup level of 500 ppm Level 3: under 25 points requires a minimum cleanup level of 1000 ppm SAMPLE RESULTS 500 ppm cleanup level is typical for an Oregon Site. The DEQ rules/goal is to protect the Ground Water.

18 Cleanup Action Options Matrix Cleanup Involves removal and transport of Contaminated Soil.

19 Pathways for vapor intrusion must be noted- Air samples may be required. Effects of nearby Residence may be required, EXAMPLE OF PATHWAYS: Utility trenches & plumbing. Risk Based Corrective Action (RBCA) or Generic Remedy What if Contamination excavation threatens a Structure? These methods allow Contaminated Soil to be left in place, if tested Carcinogen levels are sufficiently low. But… Depending on Soil Test Levels:

20 Risk Based Corrective Action (RBCA) or Generic Remedy These methods allow Contaminated Soil to be left in place if tested Carcinogen levels are sufficiently low. But… At a later time… old contamination may be mistaken for a new leak.

21 Ground Water changes the method of Cleanup DEQ will over see the Cleanup.

22 The final Process is to produce a Environmental Report on the Cleanup Activities. This report ranges from 30 to 40 pages. Copies are sent to: The DEQ with filing fee. 2- Copies to the Home Owner. Contractor retains a File Copy for 10 years. When the Cleanup is Complete.

23 The DEQ DOES NOT oversee most RESIDENTIAL cleanups. THE DEQ does not issue a No further Action Letter. The DEQ performs random audits on Contractors to check for Cleanup procedure compliance. YOU SHOULD KNOW… If it is discovered (from an audit) that the contractor did not complete the work to DEQ specifications, the contractor must complete the work at their cost. THE HOME OWNER WILL REMAIN THE RESPONSIBLE PERSON.

24 New Steel Tank with Anode Tank Replacement

25 Old Tank next to a New Tank Tank Replacement

26 Old Tank next to a New Tank Tank Replacement

27 Old Tank next to a New Tank Tank Replacement

28 Which is better? Above Ground Tanks (AST) What I like: They are easy to monitor. What I dont Like: Permitting, placement and Seismic Requirements make them expensive to install. They take up space. They are eye sores. They are physically exposed. Underground Steel Tanks (UST)-with Anodes What I like: They are inexpensive to put back into the excavation of the old Tank. They save space. They are visually unseen. Cathodic Protection (Anodes) can add up to 30 years of life to the Tank. What I dont Like: Anodes should be tested and occasionally replaced (inexpensive), Underground Fiberglass Tanks All the advantages of a UST without requiring Cathodic Protection. But it is more expensive than a steel Tank. Tank Replacement

29 Why we prefer underground Tanks

30 Info-Brochure Universal Applicators, Inc.


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