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SILK From Moth to Cloth. The Legend Xi-Ling-Shi, Wife of the Yellow EmperorXi-Ling-Shi, Wife of the Yellow Emperor.

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Presentation on theme: "SILK From Moth to Cloth. The Legend Xi-Ling-Shi, Wife of the Yellow EmperorXi-Ling-Shi, Wife of the Yellow Emperor."— Presentation transcript:

1 SILK From Moth to Cloth

2 The Legend

3 Xi-Ling-Shi, Wife of the Yellow EmperorXi-Ling-Shi, Wife of the Yellow Emperor

4 The Legend Xi-Ling-Shi, Wife of the Yellow EmperorXi-Ling-Shi, Wife of the Yellow Emperor 2672 B.C. – Neolithic, or New Stone Age, nearly five thousand years ago2672 B.C. – Neolithic, or New Stone Age, nearly five thousand years ago

5 The Legend Xi-Ling-Shi, Wife of the Yellow EmperorXi-Ling-Shi, Wife of the Yellow Emperor 2672 B.C. – Neolithic, or New Stone Age, nearly five thousand years ago2672 B.C. – Neolithic, or New Stone Age, nearly five thousand years ago Cocoon dropped into tea cupCocoon dropped into tea cup

6 Simple Silkworm Facts

7 Silk comes from silkworms, which are larvae of the silk moth, Bombyx mori.

8 Simple Silkworm Facts Silk comes from silkworms, which are larvae of the silk moth, Bombyx mori. Each caterpillar spins a single cocoon – it can be up to 1500 meters of unbroken thread – nearly a mile!

9 Simple Silkworm Facts Silk comes from silkworms, which are larvae of the silk moth, Bombyx mori. Each caterpillar spins a single cocoon – it can be up to 1500 meters of unbroken thread – nearly a mile! The caterpillars only eat mulberry leaves, and they eat so much they increase their body weight by up to10,000 times over four weeks.

10 Silkworms hatch from tiny eggs the size of poppy seeds.

11 This little guy is only a few hours old.

12 They eat a LOT of leaves.

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19 By the time theyre ready to spin cocoons, they will be as big as an adults finger.

20 The caterpillar starts to spin by putting down a silk web.

21 The caterpillar will spin for three days, until the cocoon is very solid.

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24 Inside the cocoon, the caterpillar changes its skin and becomes a pupa.

25 After about three weeks, the pupa will turn into a moth, and hatch from the cocoon.

26 First, the moth squirts an enzyme on the silk to soften it.

27 After about three weeks, the pupa will turn into a moth, and hatch from the cocoon. Then, the moth digs its way out through the silk.

28 After about three weeks, the pupa will turn into a moth, and hatch from the cocoon. Its wings are soft and limp.

29 Even when their wings are dry, domesticated silkmoths cannot fly. This is a male moth.

30 This is a female moth. She will lay eggs.

31 The moths have no mouths, and they cannot eat or drink. They live usually four or five days.

32 If the moth hatches, it breaks the cocoon into many short pieces of silk. To turn cocoons into silk thread, they are stifled, or baked, to kill and dry the pupa.

33 Silk Reeling

34 Each silk cocoon is a single thread – but it is as fine as a spider web.

35 Silk Reeling Each silk cocoon is a single thread – but it is as fine as a spider web. The threads from several cocoons are wound together – this is called reeling.

36 Silk Reeling Each silk cocoon is a single thread – but it is as fine as a spider web. The threads from several cocoons are wound together – this is called reeling. A set of pulleys, called a croissure, helps to strengthen the thread.

37 Silk Reeling Each silk cocoon is a single thread – but it is as fine as a spider web. The threads from several cocoons are wound together – this is called reeling. A set of pulleys, called a croissure, helps to strengthen the thread. Twenty cocoons makes a strand as fine as a hair.

38 Silk Reeling A brush helps to find the ends of the cocoons.

39 Silk Reeling At first, there is a tangled mess.

40 Silk Reeling But after a while, there is one end for each cocoon.

41 Silk Reeling This is the croissure - a set of pulleys that squeezes the thread to help make it strong and remove moisture.

42 Silk Reeling This is a silk reel - it winds the silk from the cocoons.

43 Dyeing

44 Dyes make silk different colors.

45 Dyeing First, the white yarn is soaked in water.

46 Dyeing The dye liquid looks like kool-aid.

47 Dyeing The silk is dipped until it soaks up the color.

48 Dyeing After they dry, the threads are ready to use.

49 Things I make with silk I like to weave with silk.

50 Things I make with silk I make ribbons for prizes and awards.

51 Things I make with silk And fancy silk bookmarks.

52 Things I make with silk And fancy silk bookmarks.

53 Things I make with silk I like to embroider with silk, too.

54 Things I make with silk Light shines beautifully on the silk threads.

55 Some Silk Facts

56 Silk can hold up to 30% of its weight in water before it feels damp.

57 Some Silk Facts Silk can hold up to 30% of its weight in water before it feels damp. Silk is an excellent electrical insulator.

58 Some Silk Facts Silk can hold up to 30% of its weight in water before it feels damp. Silk is an excellent electrical insulator. Silk is stronger per weight than steel wire.

59 Some Silk Facts Silk can hold up to 30% of its weight in water before it feels damp. Silk is an excellent electrical insulator. Silk is stronger per weight than steel wire. Silk can be made into a wide range of fabrics - everything from bridal veils to bullet-proof vests.

60 Some Silk Facts Silk can hold up to 30% of its weight in water before it feels damp. Silk is an excellent electrical insulator. Silk is stronger per weight than steel wire. Silk can be made into a wide range of fabrics - everything from bridal veils to bullet-proof vests. Silk can be used for sutures - threads to stitch closed wounds and incisions.

61 Some Silk Facts Silk can hold up to 30% of its weight in water before it feels damp. Silk is an excellent electrical insulator. Silk is stronger per weight than steel wire. Silk can be made into a wide range of fabrics - everything from bridal veils to bullet-proof vests. Silk can be used for sutures - threads to stitch closed wounds and incisions.


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