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Four major Post Impressionist painters, and the aspects of Impressionism that they criticized and how those criticisms were reflected in their work:

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Presentation on theme: "Four major Post Impressionist painters, and the aspects of Impressionism that they criticized and how those criticisms were reflected in their work:"— Presentation transcript:

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3 Four major Post Impressionist painters, and the aspects of Impressionism that they criticized and how those criticisms were reflected in their work: Vincent van Gogh Instead of reproducing the colors exactly as he saw them before his eyes, as Impressionists did, he explored the capabilities of colors and distorted forms to express his emotions as he confronted nature. Paul Gauguin He rejected objective representation in favor or subjective expression. Unlike the Impressionists but like van Gogh, he believed color above all must be expressive. Georges Seurat He was less concerned with the recording of immediate color sensations than he was with their careful and systematic organization into a new kind of pictorial order. Paul Cézanne He felt that Impressionism lacked form and structure. His objective was to create a lasting structure behind the formless and fleeting visual information the eye absorbs.

4 Katsushika Hokusai The Great Wave off Kanagawa 1857 color woodblock print 9 7/8 x 14 3/4 in.

5 Ando Hiroshige Plum Garden, Kameido 1857 color woodblock print 36 x 24 cm

6 Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec At the Moulin Rouge oil in canvas 4 ft. x 4 ft. 7 in.

7 Vincent van Gogh The Night Café 1888 oil on canvas 2 ft. 4 1/2 in. x 3 ft. For Van Gogh, the primary purpose of color in his paintings was to express emotion of an ardent temperament.

8 Vincent van Gogh Starry Night 1889 oil on canvas 2 ft. 5 in. x 3 ft. 1/4 in.

9 Vincent van Gogh Starry Night 1889 oil on canvas 2 ft. 5 in. x 3 ft. 1/4 in. Application of paint: The thickness, shape, and direction of his brush strokes create a tactile counterpart to his intense color schemes. He moved the brush vehemently back and forth or at right angles, or squeezed dots or streaks onto the canvas from a paint tube.

10 Paul Gauguin The Vision after the Sermon 1888 oil on canvas 2 ft. 4 3/4 in. x 3 ft. 1/2 in. Gauguin's use of color differed from Van Gogh's in that his color areas are flatter, often visually dissolving into abstract patches or patterns.

11 Paul Gauguin Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? 1897 oil on canvas 4 ft. 6 13/16 in. x 12 ft. 3 in. Gauguin spent the last ten years of his life in Tahiti.

12 Paul Cézanne The Basket of Apples ca oil on canvas 2 ft. 3/8 in. x 2 ft. 7 in. "I want to make of Impressionism something solid and lasting like the art in the museums Paul C é zanne.

13 Mount Sainte Victoire

14 Paul Cézanne Mount Sainte Victoire 1885 oil on canvas

15 Paul Cézanne Mount Sainte Victoire 1897 oil on canvas

16 Paul Cézanne Mount Sainte-Victoire oil on canvas 2 ft. 3 1/2 in. x 2 ft. 11 1/4 in. The role color played in Cézanne's paintings: To create the effects of distance, depth, structure, and solidity. The power of colors to modify the direction and depth of lines and planes.

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18 Georges Seurat A Sunday on La Grande Jatte oil on canvas 6 ft. 9 in. x 10 ft. The French painter who used the work of color theorists like Chevreul and Rood to develop a scientifically precise method of applying paint was Georges Seurat. The technique did he develop for applying color to canvas was calledPointillism (or divisionism): the separation of carefully observed colors into their component parts. The artist applies these pure component colors to the canvas in tiny dots or daubs. The shapes on the canvas become comprehensible only from a distance, where the viewers eye blends the dots.

19 successive contrasts (afterimages)

20 Georges Seurat A Sunday on La Grande Jatte oil on canvas 6 ft. 9 in. x 10 ft.

21 avant-garde Front guard, a synonym for any particularly new or cutting-edge cultural manifestation, derived from nineteenth-century French military usage where the avant-garde were soldiers sent ahead of the armys main body to reconnoiter and make occasional raids on the enemy. Avant-garde refers to people or works that are experimental or innovative, particularly with respect to art, culture, and politics.

22 Pierre Puvis de Chavannes The Sacred Grove 1884 oil on canvas 2 ft. 11 1/2 in. x 6 ft. 10 in. By the end of the nineteenth century, a major change occurred in the artist's vision of reality: The representation of nature had become completely subjectivized to the point that artists did not imitate nature but created free interpretations of it. Puvis de Chavannes was admired by members of the Academy because of his classicism while the avant-garde artists admired him because of his vindication of imagination and artistic independence from the world of materialism and the machine.

23 Arnold Böcklin Self-Portrait with Death Playing the Violin 1872 oil on canvas

24 Franz von Stuck The Sin 1893 oil on canvas

25 Gustave Moreau Jupiter and Semele ca oil on canvas 7 ft. x 3 ft. 4 in. Three stylistic characteristics of the work of Gustave Moreau. Gorgeous color. Intricate line. Richly detailed shape.

26 Gustave Moreau Oedipus and the Sphinx 1864 oil on canvas 81 1/4 x 41 1/4 in.

27 Odilon Redon The Cyclops 1898 oil on canvas 2 ft. 1 in. x 1 ft. 8 in. According to Redon, his originality consisted in: Bringing to life, in a human way, improbable beings and making them live according to the laws of probability, by putting … the logic of the visible at the service of the invisible.

28 Henri Rousseau The Sleeping Gypsy 1897 oil on canvas 4 ft. 3 in. 6 ft. 7 in. The work of Henri Rousseau can be related to that of the Symbolists through his reliance on dream and fantasy, but his style differs from theirs in the following way: His visual, conceptual, and technical naivet é was compensated for by a natural talent for design and an imagination teeming with exotic images of mysterious tropical landscapes.

29 Edvard Munch The Scream 1893 oil, pastel and casein on cardboard 2 ft. 11 3/4 in. x 2 ft. 5 in. The major themes in the work of Edvard Munch: The pain of human life, the powerlessness of humans before the great natural forces of death and love and the emotions associated with them.

30 Edvard Munch The Dance of Life 1900 oil on canvas 49 1/2 x 75 1/2 in.

31 Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux Ugolino and His Children marble 6 ft. 5 in. high Stylistic influences are most evident in the sculpture of Jean Baptiste Carpeaux: Realism, Baroque, classicism, and Michelangelo.

32 Augustus Saint-Gaudens Adams Memorial 1891 bronze 5 ft. 10 in. high The style Augustus Saint Gaudens utilized for his monument to Mrs. Henry Adams was considered Classical.

33 Auguste Rodin Walking Man 1905 bronze 6 ft. 11 3/4 in. high Concerns Rodin shared with the Impressionists: The effect of light on the three- dimensional surface. Concerns he shared with Muybridge and Eakins: The human body in motion.

34 Auguste Rodin Burghers of Calais bronze 6 ft. 10 1/2 in. high What did the commisioners of the Burghers of Calais find offensive in the work? The roughly textured figures, the bedraggled impression of the burghers, and the absence of a platform to separate the sculpture from the viewing public.

35 The Arts and Crafts movement originated in England. The goal of the movement was to decry the impact of rampant industrialism and to create an art made by the people for the people as a joy for the maker and the user.

36 William Morris Green Dining Room 1867 The type of objects its members produced included interior decorative objects such as wallpaper, textiles, furniture, books, rugs, stained glass, pottery, windows, lights, and wainscoting.

37 Charles Rennie Mackintosh Ingram Street Tea Room Glasgow, Scotland The Scottish artists who practice the ideas of the Arts and Crafts movement: William Morris and Charles Rennie and Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh. T wo adjectives that describe the designs of husband and wife: Precisely geometric Rhythmical

38 The style that developed out of the ideals of the Arts and Crafts movement was given different names in different countries: in France, Belgium, Holland, England and the United States: LArt Nouveau in Germany: Jugendstil in Spain: Modernismo in Italy: Floreale or Liberty

39 Victor Horta staircase in the Van Eetvelde House Brussels, Belgium 1896 Four sources from which Art Nouveau artists drew inspiration: The Arts and Crafts movement Japanese prints Symbolism Post-Impressionists such as Van Gogh and Gauguin

40 Aubrey Beardsley The Peacock Skirt for Oscar Wildes Salome 1894 pen-and-ink illustration The sort of forms were preferred by Art Nouveau artists included the twining plant form, tendrils, and delicate tracery. The English Graphic artist who worked at the intersection of Art Nouveau and symbolism was Aubrey Beardsley

41 Antonio Gaudi Casa Milá Barcelona, Spain 1907 Gaudis architectural style: Sculpturally modeled, imaginative, free-form masses with an emphasis on surface.

42 Gustav Klimt The Kiss oil on canvas 5 ft. 10 3/4 in. x 5 ft. 10 3/4 in.

43 Gustav Klimt Judith II 1909 oil on canvas 178 x 46 cm

44 Gustav Klimt Death and Life oil on canvas 70 1/8 x 78 in.

45 Louis Comfort Tiffany Lotus Table Lamp ca leaded favrile glass, mosaic and bronze 2 ft. 10 1/2 in. high

46 Alexandre-Gustave Eiffel Eiffel Tower Paris, France 1889 wrought iron 984 ft. high

47 Alexandre- Gustave Eiffel Eiffel Tower Paris, France 1889 wrought iron 984 ft. high

48 Henry Hobson Richardson Marshall Field wholesale store Chicago, Illinois

49 Louis Henry Sullivan Guaranty Building Buffalo, New York

50 Louis Henry Sullivan Carson, Pirie Scott Building Chicago, Illinois

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