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Bullying Bullying Facts Laws Policies Resources Melvin F. Blackwell Chief Student Services Officer Division of Student Services.

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Presentation on theme: "Bullying Bullying Facts Laws Policies Resources Melvin F. Blackwell Chief Student Services Officer Division of Student Services."— Presentation transcript:

1 Bullying Bullying Facts Laws Policies Resources Melvin F. Blackwell Chief Student Services Officer Division of Student Services

2 Why should we care about bullying, after all… Why should we care about bullying, after all… …it happens all the time. …its a rite of passage. …everybody has to deal with it. …there is nothing we can do about it.

3 In a recent survey of 455 adults, over 60% said they still think about being bullied as a child. Bullying Bullying

4 "I just want the bullying to stop. That is all I ever wanted. I used to love going to school. Now I hate it." 10 year-old student

5 Research links chronic bullying to school climate…the negative impact on school climate is revealed in a decline in student attendance and student achievement.

6 30% 5.7 million Almost 30% of youth in the United States (or over 5.7 million) are estimated to be involved in bullying as either a bully, a target of bullying, or both.

7 In a recent national survey of students in grades 6-10: 35% 35% reported being the target of bullying at some time during their school career. Bullying

8 For many students, bullying starts on the school bus.

9 especially if it's day in and day out "When kids get on the bus early in the morning and are immediately humiliated and degraded, that has a particularly destructive resonance, especially if it's day in and day out. being bullied on a school bus "It's difficult to reset the climate at school to (be) welcoming for a student who has just spent 45 minutes being bullied on a school bus." Bus Bullying -Stephen Wessler Center for the Prevention of Violence University of Maine

10 the overall impact can be devastating …and then when the student is picked on at school the overall impact can be devastating. most fearful things children face today School staff must realize that bullying is one of the most fearful things children face today in public schools, private schools, and neighborhoods. -Stephen Wessler Center for the Prevention of Violence University of Maine Bus Bullying

11 Bus Bullying and Safety

12 The Bully

13 who bully Students who bully are more likely to: Get into frequent fights Be injured in a fight Steal, vandalize property Drink alcohol Smoke Be truant Drop out of school Be underachievers Perceive a negative climate at school Carry a weapon Bully Bully

14 Longitudinal study of bullies reveal that: 60% conviction 60% of boys who were bullies in middle school had at least one conviction by age 24. 40% convictions 40% had three or more convictions. Bullies4 times Bullies were 4 times more likely as peers to have multiple convictions. Bully Bully

15 Bullying Victims Bullying Victims

16 Victims Victims of bullying have: Lower self esteem Higher rates of depression Higher absenteeism rates More suicidal ideation Bullying Victims Bullying Victims

17 Bullied Not bullied 16%6% Headache16%6% 42%23% Sleep problems42%23% 17%9% Abdominal pain17%9% 20%9% Feeling tense20%9% 28%10% Anxiety28%10% 23%5% Feeling unhappy23%5% 49%16% Depression scale49%16% Bullying Victims Bullying Victims

18 rarely sudden, impulsive acts Incidents of targeted violence at school are rarely sudden, impulsive acts. other students knew Prior to most incidents, other students knew about the attackers idea and/or plan to attack. prior to the incident Most attackers engaged in some behavior, prior to the incident, that caused concern or indicated a need for help. Secret Service Study

19 felt bullied Many attackers felt bullied, persecuted, or were injured by others prior to the attack. failed to report it In many cases, other students knew about the bullying but failed to report it. Secret Service Study

20 both the bully and the student who is the victim of the bullying are attended to in a respectful mannerIn a school with a culture of safety and connection, both the bully and the student who is the victim of the bullying are attended to in a respectful manner. Schools with climates of safety and respect are establishing foundations for pro-social behavior. Secret Service Study

21 conflict resolution, peer mediation, active listening, and other non-violent ways to solve problems do not turn a blind eye to bullying Positive school climates teach conflict resolution, peer mediation, active listening, and other non-violent ways to solve problems. In a safe school climate, adults do not bully students and do not bully each other - and they do not turn a blind eye to bullying behavior when they know that it is going on in the school, on the playground, or on a school bus. Secret Service Study

22 Georgias New Bullying Law 2010 - Georgia Updates with SB 250 – The law goes from a solid B to an A++.

23 Official Code of Georgia Annotated 20-2-751.4 20-2-751.4 As used in this Code section, the term 'bullying' means an act which occurs on school property, on school vehicles, at designated school bus stops, or at school related functions or activities, or by use of data or software that is accessed through a computer, computer system, computer network, or other electronic technology of a local school system, that is:

24 O.C.G.A 20-2-751.4 O.C.G.A 20-2-751.4 Any intentional written, verbal, or physical act, which a reasonable person would perceive as being intended to threaten, harass, or intimidate… …causes another person substantial physical harm within the meaning of Code Section 16-5- 23.1 or visible bodily harm as such term is defined in Code Section 16-5-23.1; Has the effect of substantially interfering with a student's education;

25 O.C.G.A 20-2-751.4 Is so severe, persistent, or pervasive that it creates an intimidating or threatening educational environment; or Has the effect of substantially disrupting the orderly operation of the school.

26 O.C.G.A 20-2-751.4 method to notify the parent, guardian, or other person who has control or charge of a student Each local board of education shall establish and publish in its local board policy a method to notify the parent, guardian, or other person who has control or charge of a student upon a finding by a school administrator that such student has committed an offense of bullying or is a victim of bullying; and

27 O.C.G.A 20-2-751.4 age-appropriate range of consequences An age-appropriate range of consequences for bullying which shall include, at minimum and without limitation, disciplinary action or counseling as appropriate under the circumstances;, to report or otherwise provide information on bullying activity A procedure for a teacher or other school employee, student, parent, guardian, or other person who has control or charge of a student, either anonymously or in such person's name, at such person's option, to report or otherwise provide information on bullying activity;

28 How Do We Apply the Georgia Bullying Law to Schools?

29 Model Intervention Phases Investigate Investigate (documentation) Notify Notify (duty to inform) Discipline Discipline (appropriate consequence) Follow Up Follow Up (prohibits retaliation)

30 Investigate Each reported incident of bullying behavior will be documented and investigated by the school / principal / designee, and in some cases school security, and a disposition determined which may include suspension from school or a referral to the student discipline tribunal. The specifics of this investigation are in discretion of the principal, but, the investigation may include : interviewing the alleged perpetrator(s) and victim(s), identified witnesses, teacher(s), staff, review of video surveillance, etc. School police, school counselors, school social workers and/or other support staff may be utilized for their expertise as determined by the circumstances of the matter.

31 Bullying can also be harassment - Some student misconduct that falls under the Districts anti-bullying policy may also trigger responsibilities under the Districts policies preventing discrimination against students on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, or disability. - Individuals receiving complaints of bullying or harassment should consider both sets of District policies that prohibit both bullying and peer harassment based on race, color, national origin, sex, or disability.

32 Investigate, Document, and Follow up Each reported incident of bullying behavior must be documented and investigated by the principal/designee, and in some cases school security, and a disposition determined which may include a suspension from school or a referral to the Student Discipline Tribunal.

33 Notify parents/guardians of the accused and the victim must be notified At some appropriate time during or after the investigation, parents/guardians of the accused and the victim must be notified. Muscogee County School District policy: Upon a finding, school administrator that a student has either committed a bullying offense or has been a victim of bullying, the students parent or guardian will be notified.

34 Discipline/Consequences given an age-appropriate consequence Schools should clearly communicate to all parties that retaliation following a report of bullying is strictly prohibited and may result in strong penalties Upon confirming that bullying has occurred, the accused student should be charged with bullying and given an age-appropriate consequence which shall include, at minimum and without limitation, disciplinary action or counseling as appropriate under the circumstances. Students in grades six through twelve found to have committed the offense of bullying for the third time in a school year shall be assigned to an alternative school. Schools should clearly communicate to all parties that retaliation following a report of bullying is strictly prohibited and may result in strong penalties.

35 Follow-Up Take care of the needs of the accused and the victim Take care of the needs of the accused and the victim through a planned method of after-care and follow up. Reiterate previously stated prohibition on retaliation of any type. Follow up is CRUCIAL.

36 failure to prevent bullying or to stop it when it occurs creates potential liability Schools and school staff must also keep in mind that a failure to prevent bullying or to stop it when it occurs creates potential liability. lawsuits Many major lawsuits have resulted when parents felt their children were not being adequately protected from bullying. -School Safety Institute Responsibility

37 CyberBullying 42% 42% of kids have been bullied or threatened online. 21% 21% of kids have received mean or threatening e-mail or other messages. 58% 58% of kids admit someone has said mean or hurtful things to them online. 53% 53% of kids admit having said mean or hurtful things to others online. 58% 58% have not told their parents or an adult about something mean or hurtful that happened to them online.

38

39 Why children do not report bullying: 85% 85% of victims felt that staff responded poorly or did not respond at all to reports of bullying. 6% 6% believed that staff responded very well. 9% 9% were undecided. Students

40 Only 35% teachers Only 35% believed teachers were interested in stopping bullying. Only 25% administrators Only 25% believed administrators were interested in stopping bullying. Only 20% others Only 20% believed others were interested in stopping bullying. Students

41 How Do We Stop Bullying? change in the school climatenorms for behavior What is required to reduce bullying in schools is nothing less than a change in the school climate and in norms for behavior. entire school community This requires a comprehensive, school- wide effort involving the entire school community. work together -National Association of State Boards of Education

42 Lack of supervision Rules against bullying are not consistently enforced Adults have indifferent or accepting attitudes towards bullying Students have indifferent or accepting attitudes Bullying Risk Factors

43 attitude Another significant bullying risk factor is the attitude that adults have about bullying. ONE EXAMPLE … Bullying Risk Factors

44 The Bullying Cycle Starts the bullying and takes an active part Takes an active part, but does not start the bullying Supports the bullying, but does not take an active part Likes the bullying, but does not display open support Watches what happens but does not take a stand Dislikes the bullying and thinks he/she should help, but does not Dislikes the bullying and helps or tries to help the victim Victim © The Olweus Bullying Prevention Group, 2004 Hero Bully

45 What Can We Do?

46 Approaches that simply crack down on individual bullies are seldom effective. bullying can be reduced significantly However, when there is a school-wide or district-wide commitment to end bullying, bullying can be reduced significantly. Bullying Bullying

47 Coordinate with other schools in the district. Assess the extent of the problem. Establish a coordinating team. Involve the entire school community. Include bullying in code of conduct with a clear definition. Establish and consistently enforce consequences for bullying. Build students' sense of responsibility for the school community.

48 Division of Student Services Melvin F. Blackwell Blackwell.Melvin@muscogee.k12.ga.us (706) 748-3336


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