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Making Presentations That Audiences Will Love Purpose of making Visual Presentations Presentations Purpose of making Visual Presentations Presentations.

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Presentation on theme: "Making Presentations That Audiences Will Love Purpose of making Visual Presentations Presentations Purpose of making Visual Presentations Presentations."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Making Presentations That Audiences Will Love

3 Purpose of making Visual Presentations Presentations Purpose of making Visual Presentations Presentations Illustration or demonstration Illustration or demonstration Understanding of the message Entertainment Guide Information Retention

4 Use a Template n Use a set font and color scheme. n Different styles are disconcerting to the audience. n You want the audience to focus on what you present, not the way you present.

5 Fonts n Choose a clean font that is easy to read. Roman and Gothic typefaces are easier to read than Script or Old English. Roman and Gothic typefaces are easier to read than Script or Old English. n Stick with one or two types of fonts.

6 Font Size n Bulleted items should be no smaller than 22 points. n The title should be no smaller than 28 points.

7 Bullets n Keep each bullet to one line, two at the most. n Limit the number of bullets in a screen to six, four if there is a large title, logo, picture, etc. –This is known as cueing –This is known as cueing –You want to cue the audience in on what you are going to say. n Cues can be thought of as a brief preview. n Cues can be thought of as a brief preview. n This gives the audience a framework to build upon.

8 Bullets (con.) n If you crowd too much text, the audience will not read it. –Too much text makes it look busy and is hard to read. –Why should they spend the energy reading it, when you are going to tell them what it says? –Our reading speed does not match our listening speed; hence, they confuse instead of reinforcing each other.

9 Caps and Italics n Do not use all capital letters –Makes text hard to read –Conceals acronyms –Denies their use for EMPHASIS n Italics –Used for quotes –Used for quotes –Used to highlight thoughts or ideas –Used for book, journal, or magazine titles

10 ColorsColorsColorsColors n Reds and oranges are high-energy but can be difficult to stay focused on. n Greens, blues, and browns are mellower, but not as attention grabbing. n White on dark background should not be used if the audience is more than 20 feet away. –This set of slides is a good example. –You can easily read the slides up close. –It is harder to read the further away you get.

11 Backgrounds n A white on a dark background was used for this set of slides as: –It is assumed that most users will view the presentation on their own computer. –Having a dark background on a computer screen reduces glare.

12 The Color Wheel n Colors separated by another color are contrasting colors (also known as complementary) n Adjacent colors (next to each other) harmonize with one another. e.g. Green and Yellow n The color wheel below is simplified for easy use

13 Clashing Colors n Colors that are directly opposite from one another are said to clash. n These provide readability - e.g. yellow on blue.

14 To make a slide stand out, change the font or background

15 Illustrations n Use only when needed, otherwise they become distracters instead of communicators n They should relate to the message and help make a point n Ask yourself if it makes the message clearer n Simple diagrams are great communicators

16 Flipcharts n Make letters at least a 1/4 high n Flipcharts with lines are much easier to write on

17 Overhead & LCD Size for Readability Screen Screen /4 inch /4 inch /8 inch /8 inch /2 inch /2 inch Examples: 1/4 type shown on a screen size of 6 can be seen 30 away (20 point Times Roman equals 1/4 type) 1/4 type shown on a screen size of 6 can be seen 30 away (20 point Times Roman equals 1/4 type) 1/2 type shown on a 10 screen can be seen 75 away (40 point Times Roman equals 1/4 type) 1/2 type shown on a 10 screen can be seen 75 away (40 point Times Roman equals 1/4 type)

18 Great presentations require some preplanning First, read Meetings for an outline of preparing and conducting a meeting, such as acquiring a room, informing participants, etc. A presentation follows the same basic guidelines as preparing for a meeting. Meetings Second, prepare the presentation: A good presentation starts out with introductions and an icebreaker such as a story, interesting statement or fact, joke, quotation, or an activity to get the group warmed up. The introduction also needs an objective, that is, the purpose or goal of the presentation. This not only tells you what you will talk about, but it also informs the audience of the purpose of the presentation.

19 The body of the presentation All you want is an outline. set of index cards have your outline actual presentation. Do NOT write it out word for word Jotting down the main points Jotting down the main points To prepare the presentation, ask yourself the following: What is the purpose of the presentation? Who will be attending? What does the audience already know about the subject? What is the audience's attitude towards me (e.g. hostile, friendly)?

20 Presentation Title Preplanning Notes: Purpose - What do you want from the audience or what does the audience need from you? Audience - How much knowledge do they have? Logistics - time, audience size, room size Equipment - slide projector, screen, flip chart Set up - Arrive early! Ensure the room is ready (chairs and tables arranged, presentation materials, name tags, audiovisual equipment). Presentation Title Preplanning Notes: Purpose - What do you want from the audience or what does the audience need from you? Audience - How much knowledge do they have? Logistics - time, audience size, room size Equipment - slide projector, screen, flip chart Set up - Arrive early! Ensure the room is ready (chairs and tables arranged, presentation materials, name tags, audiovisual equipment). Presentation Outline

21 T otal Time: 30 min. Time: 5 min Slide 1 1) Introduction: Introduce yourself (let them know you are a real person). a) Interest device or "grabber" (war story, shocking statistic). b) Authority (why they should listen to you). c) Objective - Help them to visualize a clear goal, such as how this information will help them with a task or job. d) Special instructions, facilities, etc. Presentation Outline Date Outline (Contd.)

22 Time: 5 min Slide 2 Time: 5 min Slide 2 a) First Point: Focus on one topic. i) Do not try to cover too much at one time. Instead, schedule more meetings. ii) Allow the audience to stay focused! a) First Point: Focus on one topic. i) Do not try to cover too much at one time. Instead, schedule more meetings. ii) Allow the audience to stay focused! Time: 5 min Slide 3 Slide 4 Time: 5 min Slide 3 Slide 4 b) Second Point: Stay connected - get out from behind the podium. i) Get the audience involved. ii) Get creative! iii) Mix your media to reinforce the message. b) Second Point: Stay connected - get out from behind the podium. i) Get the audience involved. ii) Get creative! iii) Mix your media to reinforce the message. Time: 5 min Slide 5 Time: 15 min Slide 6 Time: 5 min Slide 5 Time: 15 min Slide 6 c) Third Point: Practice, Practice, Practice d) Forth Point: To enter another point, press the [Tab] key. c) Third Point: Practice, Practice, Practice d) Forth Point: To enter another point, press the [Tab] key. Outline (Contd.)

23 Tips and Techniques For Great Presentations If you have handouts, do not read straight from them. The audience does not know if they should read along with you or listen to you read Do not put both hands in your pockets for long periods of time. This tends to make you look unprofessional. It is OK to put one hand in a pocket but ensure there is no loose change or keys to jingle around. This will distract the listeners

24 Do not lean on the podium for long periods. The audience will begin to wonder when you are going to fall over. Do not wave a pointer around in the air like a wild knight branding a sword to slay a dragon. Use the pointer for what it is intended and then put it down, otherwise the audience will become fixated upon your "sword", instead upon you. Tips and Techniques For Great Presentations (Cont.)

25 You should be confident enough with your own material so that the audience's interests and concerns, not the presentation outline, determines the format. Use your background, experience, and knowledge to interrelate your subject matter. When writing on flip charts use no more than 7 lines of text per page and no more than 7 word per line (the 7 7 rule). Also, use bright and bold colors, and pictures as well as text. Consider the time of day and how long you have got for your talk. Time of day can affect the audience Tips and Techniques For Great Presentations (Cont.)

26 Include some visual information that will help the audience understand your presentation. Develop charts, graphs, slides, handouts, etc. After the body, comes the closing. This is where you ask for questions, provide a wrap-up (summary), and thank the participants for attending. Include some visual information that will help the audience understand your presentation. Develop charts, graphs, slides, handouts, etc. After the body, comes the closing. This is where you ask for questions, provide a wrap-up (summary), and thank the participants for attending. Tips and Techniques For Great Presentations (Cont.)

27 We all have a few habits, and some are more annoying than others. For example, if we say "uh," "you know," or put our hands in our pockets and jingle our keys too often during a presentation, it distracts from the message we are trying to get across. Habits

28 The best way to break one of these distracting habits is with immediate feedback. This can be done with a small group of coworkers, family, or friends. Take turns giving small off-the-cuff talks about your favorite hobby, work project, first work assignment, etc. It talk should last about five minutes. During a speaker's first talk, the audience should listen and watch for annoying habits. What is the solution?

29 After the presentation, the audience should agree on the worst two or three habits that take the most away from the presentation. After agreement, each audience member should write these habits on a 8 1/2" x 11" sheet of paper (such as the word "Uh"). Use a magic marker and write in BIG letters. When it can be done?

30 The next time the person gives her or his talk, each audience member should wave the corresponding sign in the air whenever they hear or see the annoying habit. For most people, this method will break a habit by practicing at least once a day for one to two weeks. On the spot Checking

31 Lunch, Launch or Landing is known as the graveyard section in speaking circles as audiences will feel more like a nap than listening to a talk. Most people find that if they practice in their head, the actual talk will take about 25 per cent longer. Using a flip chart or other visual aids also adds to the time. Remember - it is better to finish slightly early than to overrun. The Greatest Speaking Problem

32 Learn the name of each participant as quickly as possible. Based upon the atmosphere you want to create, call them by their first names or by using Mr., Mrs., Miss, Ms Tell them what name and title you prefer to be called. Listen intently to comments and opinions. By using a lateral thinking technique (adding to ideas rather than dismissing them), the audience will feel that their ideas, comments, and opinions are worthwhile Get to the presentation before your audience arrives; be the last one to leave. Be prepared to use an alternate approach if the one you've chosen seems to bog down. Interact with the Audience

33 Circulate around the room as you speak. This movement creates a physical closeness to the audience. List and discuss your objectives at the beginning of the presentation. Let the audience know how your presentation fits in with their goals. Discuss some of the fears and apprehensions that both you and the audience might have. Tell them what they should expect of you and how you will contribute to their goals. Vary your techniques (lecture, discussion, debate, films, slides, reading, etc.) Interact with the Audience (Contd.)

34 A 45 minutes talk should have no more than about seven main points. This may not seem like very many, but if you are to leave the audience with a clear picture of what you have said, you cannot expect them to remember much more than that. There are several options for structuring the presentation: Timeline - Arranged in sequential order. Climax - The main points are delivered in order of increasing importance. Problem/Solution - A problem is presented, a solution is suggested, and benefits are then given. Classification - The important items are the major points. Simple to complex - Ideas are listed from the simplest to the most complex. Can also be done in reverse order. Time Limit

35 And finally, the important part - practice, practice, practice. The main purpose of creating an outline is to develop a coherent plan of what you want to talk about. You should know your presentation so well, that during the actual presentation, you should only have to briefly glance at your notes to ensure you are staying on track. This will also help you with your nerves by giving you the confidence that you can do it. Practice does it make difference?

36 An effective way of overcoming this problem is to pause at the time when there would normally be punctuation marks. Use colored backgrounds on overhead transparencies and slides (such as yellow) as the bright white light can be harsh on the eyes people cannot see the punctuation and this can lead to misunderstandings The disadvantages of Media presentations Solution

37 Your practice session should include a "live" session by practicing in front of coworkers, family, or friends. They can be valuable at providing feedback and it gives you a chance to practice controlling your nerves. Another great feedback technique is to make a video or audio tape of your presentation and review it critically with a colleague. Practice does it makes difference?

38 Speaking with Visual Presentations Presentations Speak to the audience...NOT to the visual aids, such as flip charts or overheads Do not speak in a monotone voice Do not speak in a monotone voice Also, do not stand between the visual aid and the audience. Speak clearly and loudly enough for all to hear Use inflection to emphasize your main points

39 YOU Remember, only you can prevent Death by PowerPoint Death by PowerPoint Remember This Do not use the media to hide you n The audience came to see you n The media should enhance the presentation, not BE the presentation n If all you are going to do is read from the slides or overheads, then just send them the slides


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