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Love Me, Love Me Not: Emotional Abuse in Relationships This is designed to be a basic design for your bulletin board. Please feel free to adapt this design.

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Presentation on theme: "Love Me, Love Me Not: Emotional Abuse in Relationships This is designed to be a basic design for your bulletin board. Please feel free to adapt this design."— Presentation transcript:

1 Love Me, Love Me Not: Emotional Abuse in Relationships This is designed to be a basic design for your bulletin board. Please feel free to adapt this design to fit the needs of your audience. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the STOP Violence Office. Knight Hall

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3 Emotional Abuse Abuse is any behavior that is designed to control and subjugate another human being through the use of fear, humiliation, and verbal or physical assaults. Emotional abuse is any kind of abuse that is emotional rather than physical in nature. It can include anything from verbal abuse and constant criticism to more subtle tactics, such as intimidation, manipulation, and refusal to ever be pleased. STOP Violence Program Dean of Students Office, Knight Hall ,

4 Signs of Emotional Abuse Are you anxious and worried about what will happen when you and your significant other are together? Apart? Are you the subject of name- calling? Are you the subject of yelling? Are you the subject of screaming? Are you the subject of threats? STOP Violence Program Dean of Students Office, Knight Hall ,

5 Effects of Emotional Abuse Isolation from others Low self-esteem Depression Emotional problems Illness Increased alcohol or drug use Withdrawal from real life into an Internet alternative reality STOP Violence Program Dean of Students Office, Knight Hall ,

6 Types of Emotional Abuse: Aggressing Aggressive forms of abuse include: – name-calling, accusing, blaming, threatening, and ordering. Aggressing behaviors are generally direct and obvious. The one-up position the abuser assumes by attempting to judge or invalidate the recipient undermines the equality and autonomy that are essential to healthy adult relationships. This parent-to-child pattern of communication (which is common to all forms of verbal abuse) is most obvious when the abuser takes an aggressive stance. Aggressive abuse can also take a more indirect form and may even be disguised as helping. Criticizing, advising, offering solutions, analyzing, probing, and questioning another person may be a sincere attempt to help. STOP Violence Program Dean of Students Office, Knight Hall ,

7 Types of Emotional Abuse: Denying Invalidating seeks to distort or undermine the recipients perceptions of their world. Invalidating occurs when the abuser refuses or fails to acknowledge reality. For example, if the recipient confronts the abuser about an incident of name calling, the abuser may insist, I never said that, I dont know what youre talking about, etc. Withholding is another form of denying. Withholding includes refusing to listen, refusing to communicate, and emotionally withdrawing as punishment. This is sometimes called the silent treatment. Countering occurs when the abuser views the recipient as an extension of themselves and denies any viewpoints or feelings which differ from their own. STOP Violence Program Dean of Students Office, Knight Hall ,

8 Types of Emotional Abuse: Minimizing Minimizing is a less extreme form of denial. When minimizing, the abuser may not deny that a particular event occurred, but they question the recipients emotional experience or reaction to an event. Statements such as Youre too sensitive, Youre exaggerating, or Youre blowing this out of proportion all suggest that the recipients emotions and perceptions are faulty and not to be trusted. Trivializing, which occurs when the abuser suggests that what you have done or communicated is inconsequential or unimportant, is a more subtle form of minimizing. Denying and minimizing can be particularly damaging. In addition to lowering self-esteem and creating conflict, the invalidation of reality, feelings, and experiences can eventually lead you to question and mistrust your own perceptions and emotional experience. STOP Violence Program Dean of Students Office, Knight Hall ,

9 Basic Rights of a Relationship STOP Violence Program Dean of Students Office, Knight Hall , If you have been involved in emotionally abusive relationships, you may not have a clear idea of what a healthy relationship is like. Evans (1992) suggests the following as basic rights in a relationship for you and your partner: The right to good will from the other. The right to emotional support. The right to be heard by the other and to be responded to with courtesy. The right to have your own view, even if your partner has a different view. The right to have your feelings and experience acknowledged as real. The right to receive a sincere apology for any jokes you may find offensive. The right to clear and informative answers to questions that concern what is legitimately your business. The right to live free from accusation and blame. The right to live free from criticism and judgment. The right to have your work and your interests spoken of with respect. The right to encouragement. The right to live free from emotional and physical threat. The right to live free from angry outbursts and rage. The right to be called by no name that devalues you. The right to be respectfully asked rather than ordered.

10 Signs of an Abusive Relationship STOP Violence Program Dean of Students Office, Knight Hall , If you argue with him, he says you're stubborn. If you're quiet, he argues with you anyway. If you call him, he says you're needy and clingy. If he calls you, he thinks you should be grateful. If you don't act like you love him, he'll try to win you over. If you tell him you love him, he takes advantage of you. If you dress sexy, he says you're a slut. If you don't dress nice, he says you look bad. When you don't sleep with him, he says you don't love him. If you do sleep with him, he only does it the way he likes it. If you tell him your problems, he says you're bothering him, If you don't, he says you don't trust him. If you try to bring up a problem, he says you're bitching. If he brings up a problem, he yells. If you break a promise, you "can't be trusted". If he breaks it, it's because "he had to". If you cheat, he wants to punish you by locking you up or beating you. If he cheats, he expects to be given another chance.

11 Campus Resources STOP Violence Program Dean of Students Office, Knight Hall , STOP Violence Program Knight Hall University Counseling Center Knight Hall Dean of Students Office Knight Hall University Wyoming Police Department 1426 E. Flint St

12 Resources STOP Violence Program Dean of Students Office, Knight Hall , s.edu/?page_id=168 domestic_violence_abuse_types _signs_causes_effects.htm hips/emotional-abuse/ tml

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