Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Author: Jane Goodall Genre: Expository Nonfiction Big Question: Why is it important to study animals responsibly?

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Author: Jane Goodall Genre: Expository Nonfiction Big Question: Why is it important to study animals responsibly?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Author: Jane Goodall Genre: Expository Nonfiction Big Question: Why is it important to study animals responsibly?

2

3 Story Sort Story Sort VocabularyWords Vocabulary Words: Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words

4

5 discontent decline outward dispatch unwavering destruction disintegrate outstanding uncommon outburst outrageous defensive unappetizing disillusioned disarray unconscious outskirts unfasten disenchanted decompose unbusinesslike disembark deactivate disenfranchise outlandish adolescence

6

7 captive companionship existence ordeal primitive sanctuaries stimulating smuggle welfare conservationists data expedition Vocabulary Words More Words to Know

8 Question of the Day Why is it important to study animals responsibly?

9 Build Concepts Authors Purpose Answer Questions Build Background Vocabulary Fluency: Pauses Grammar: Pronouns and Antecedents Spelling: Prefixes dis-, de-, out-, un- Animal Research

10

11 Listen as I read Something in the Elephants Silence. As I read, notice how I pause for the different types of punctuations, which include periods, commas, colons, dashes, and ellipses. Be ready to answer questions after I finish.

12 What is the authors purpose in writing this article? Do you think the author met her purpose? Why or why not?

13 conservationists – people who want to preserve and protect natural resources data – facts from which conclusions can be drawn expedition – journey for some special purpose (next slide)

14 (To add information to the graphic organizer, click on end show, type in your new information, and save your changes.)

15 Who does it? What are the results? How is it done? Animal Research

16

17 K (What do you know?) W (What would you like to learn?) L (What did you learn?)

18 This weeks audio explores the difference between verbal and nonverbal language. After we listen, we will discuss what you found out.

19

20 captive – kept in confinement captive companionship – friendly feeling among companions; fellowship existence – condition of being ordeal – a severe test or experience primitive – very simple sanctuaries- places of refuge or protectionsanctuaries- stimulating – lively; engaging

21 smuggle – to unlawfully take something into or out of a country welfare– health, happiness, and prosperity; condition of being or doing well (Next Slide)

22

23

24

25 she thought the pare was unapetizing She thought the pear was unappetizing. the zoo attendants welcomed all the chidren and his parents The zoo attendants welcomed all the children and their parents.

26 People throughout the world know Jane Goodall and respect her. The pronoun her refers to the antecedent Jane Goodall. An antecedent is the noun to which a pronoun refers. A pronoun and its antecedent can appear in the same sentence or in separate sentences.

27 A pronoun takes the place of a noun or nouns. An antecedent, or referent, is the noun or nouns to which the pronoun refers. A pronoun and its antecedent must agree in number and gender.

28 Before you use a pronoun, ask yourself whether the antecedent is singular or plural. If the antecedent is singular, decide whether it is masculine, feminine, or neuter. Then choose a pronoun that agrees.

29 In the following sentences, the antecedents are underlined once; the pronouns are underlined twice. Sal and Jo bought a book about chimps, and they read it together. Erik brought a camera to the zoo so he could take pictures.

30 The chimpanzees gathered smooth sticks and used them to catch ants. Jane Goodall observed chimpanzees and helped them survive in nature.

31 Chimpanzees have interesting ways of finding food when they are hungry.

32 Although Vicky learned to say four words, very few people could understand her.

33 We students are eager to meet Jane Goodall when she speaks at the school.

34 Ai grabbed the doll and hugged it. In 1961, Ham was placed aboard a rocket to see whether he could survive the space flight.

35 they it she us him Paige and I wanted to hold the baby chimp, but the mother would not let _____. Paige and I wanted to hold the baby chimp, but the mother would not let us.

36 they it she us him Chimpanzees cannot speak because _____ have different vocal cords than ours. Chimpanzees cannot speak because they have different vocal cords than ours.

37 they it she us him After Lucy grabbed a stone, ____ use it to crack open a nut. After Lucy grabbed a stone, she used it to crack open a nut.

38 they it she us him The chimpanzee saw the banana and reached for ____. The chimpanzee saw the banana and reached for it.

39 they it she us him Bill will take pictures if you give ____ film. Bill will take pictures if you give him film.

40

41 discontent decline outward dispatch unwavering destruction disintegrate outstanding uncommon outburst outrageous defensive unappetizing disillusioned disarray unconscious outskirts unfasten disenchanted decompose unbusinesslike disembark deactivate disenfranchise outlandish adolescence

42 Question of the Day Do you think chimpanzees have feelings? Why or why not?

43 Dictionary/Glossary Authors Purpose Answer Questions Fact and Opinion Vocabulary Fluency: Choral Reading Grammar: Pronouns and Antecedents Spelling: Prefixes dis-, de-, out-, un- Time for Science: Women in Science Animal Research

44

45

46

47 Turn to page 436, first two paragraphs. As I read, notice how I pause for commas, dashes, and periods. We will practice as a class doing three choral readings of these paragraphs.

48

49 the monkeys was difensive about territory that they thought belonged to him The monkeys were defensive about territory that they thought belonged to them. dad drived aunt paula and i to the zoo Dad drove Aunt Paula and me to the zoo.

50 A pronoun takes the place of a noun or nouns. An antecedent, or referent, is the noun or nouns to which the pronoun refers. A personal pronoun and its antecedent must agree in number and gender.

51

52 discontent decline outward dispatch unwavering destruction disintegrate outstanding uncommon outburst outrageous defensive unappetizing disillusioned disarray unconscious outskirts unfasten disenchanted decompose unbusinesslike disembark deactivate disenfranchise outlandish adolescence

53 Question of the Day How can you make a difference in the way animals are treated?

54 Authors Purpose Answer Questions Dictionary/Glossary Vocabulary Fluency: Model Pauses Grammar: Pronouns and Antecedents Spelling: Prefixes dis-, de-, out-, un- Time for Science: Changes in Biodiversity Competing for Resources Animal Research

55

56

57 Turn to page 440, first paragraph. As I read notice how I pause slightly longer at the ends of sentences than for internal punctuation. Now we will practice together as a class by doing three choral readings.

58

59 jane goodall have exhibited her unwaivering devotion to chimps Jane Goodall has exhibited her unwavering devotion to chimps. the apes outburst surprised she The apes outburst surprised her.

60 A pronoun takes the place of a noun or nouns. An antecedent, or referent, is the noun or nouns to which the pronoun refers. A personal pronoun and its antecedent must agree in number and gender.

61 If a pronouns antecedent is confusing, the sentence should be rewritten. Sometimes it is clearer to use a noun instead of a pronoun. Unclear: Pat and Kate went to her house. Clear: Pat and Kate went to Pats house.

62 Review something you have written to check that pronouns have clear antecedents.

63

64 discontent decline outward dispatch unwavering destruction disintegrate outstanding uncommon outburst outrageous defensive unappetizing disillusioned disarray unconscious outskirts unfasten disenchanted decompose unbusinesslike disembark deactivate disenfranchise outlandish adolescence

65 Question of the Day What do you think humans could learn from animals?

66 Expository Nonfiction Reading Across Texts Content-Area Vocabulary Fluency: Partner Reading Grammar: Pronouns and Antecedents Spelling: Prefixes dis-, de-, out-, un- Time for Science: The American Sign Language Animal Communication

67

68

69 Turn to page 440, first paragraph. Read this paragraph three times with a partner. Be sure to pause at commas and periods. Offer each other feedback.

70

71 doug and his classmates has finished her ape projects Doug and his classmates have finished their ape projects. do you agree that the logging companies is destroying the rain forest with their trucks Do you agree that the logging companies are destroying the rain forest with their trucks?

72 A pronoun takes the place of a noun or nouns. An antecedent, or referent, is the noun or nouns to which the pronoun refers. A personal pronoun and its antecedent must agree in number and gender.

73 Test Tip: When writing pronouns with appositives, try omitting the noun to see which pronoun form to use. Example: (We, Us) sixth graders use the computers daily. We use computers daily. We sixth graders use the computer daily. Since We is a subject pronoun for the sentence, We is the correct pronoun.

74

75 discontent decline outward dispatch unwavering destruction disintegrate outstanding uncommon outburst outrageous defensive unappetizing disillusioned disarray unconscious outskirts unfasten disenchanted decompose unbusinesslike disembark deactivate disenfranchise outlandish adolescence

76 Question of the Day Why is it important to study animals responsibly?

77 Build Concept Vocabulary Authors Purpose Persuasive Devices Dictionary/Glossary Grammar: Pronouns and Antecedents Spelling: Prefixes dis-, de-, out-, un- Electronic Media Animal Research

78 There are four main purposes for writing: to persuade, to inform, to express ideas or feelings, and to entertain. After you finish reading a selection, you should think about whether the author met his or her purpose in writing and why the author was or was not successful.

79 In the Chimpanzees I Love, Goodall presents facts, expert opinion, and both logical and emotional arguments to persuade readers that people should treat chimpanzees humanely. Some persuasive writing, however, relies on devices that are less valid such as bandwagon, loaded words, and testimonial. Be aware of these common persuasive devices.

80 Vague generality is a statement that is intentionally broad or vague, such as Chimpanzees are the coolest animals! Sweeping generalization overstates a situation, such as No one cares about chimpanzees because theyre animals.

81 You can use a dictionary or glossary to find the means of unfamiliar words. Find the meaning of unfamiliar words by finding the definition for each word in the chart below.

82 WordsDefinition bleak artificial innovations offspring

83 What electronic media do you use most often for doing research? There are two types of electronic media available for research computer and non-computer.

84 The same strategies apply to both printed and electronic sources, such as analyzing information, evaluating sources, asking questions, and taking notes.

85 Non-computer electronic media include audiotapes, videotapes, DVDs, television, and radio. Computer programs and services include online Internet searches, online encyclopedia, CD-ROMs, internet databases, computer programs, and .

86

87

88 befour the chimps is fed they chatter in there cages Before the chimps are fed, they chatter in their cages. the crowd are listening to dr goodalls seminar The crowd is listening to Dr. Goodalls seminar.

89 A pronoun takes the place of a noun or nouns. An antecedent, or referent, is the noun or nouns to which the pronoun refers. A personal pronoun and its antecedent must agree in number and gender.

90

91 discontent decline outward dispatch unwavering destruction disintegrate outstanding uncommon outburst outrageous defensive unappetizing disillusioned disarray unconscious outskirts unfasten disenchanted decompose unbusinesslike disembark deactivate disenfranchise outlandish adolescence

92 Story test Classroom webpage, Reading Test AR Other Reading Quizzes Quiz #


Download ppt "Author: Jane Goodall Genre: Expository Nonfiction Big Question: Why is it important to study animals responsibly?"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google