Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

By Frank McCourt. This novel revolves around the penniless childhood of Frank McCourt. It begins in America with four-year-old Frank, his three year-old.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "By Frank McCourt. This novel revolves around the penniless childhood of Frank McCourt. It begins in America with four-year-old Frank, his three year-old."— Presentation transcript:

1 by Frank McCourt

2 This novel revolves around the penniless childhood of Frank McCourt. It begins in America with four-year-old Frank, his three year-old brother Malachy, who bears the same name as his father, the infant twins, Eugene and Oliver, and the memories of the baby Margaret, "already dead and gone. Blessed with a loving mother, Angela, and cursed with a father who means well, but is constantly drunk. Early in Franks life, his family moves to Ireland, with help from his aunts and grandmother. Unfortunately, money is not easily found in Ireland either, and the McCourt family migrates from home to home, barely surviving. The McCourts experience tragedy upon tragedy. Franks physical romance with a young lady named Theresa Carmody sick with consumption, his unfortunate habit to "interfere with himself," and the sad moment when in a drunken stupor on his first pint he strikes his own mother causes Frank to fear he is doomed to an eternity in hell. Unbelievably, despite all of the terrible things that happen in Frank's childhood, there are moments described in the book that give the reader a complete sense of joy and hope. The words seem as if they gently tumbled directly out of the mouth of the seven-year-old Frankie, or mischievously flew from Frank as an thirteen-year-old "working man." This novel was exquisitely written and is a jewel to read, as well as a treasure to remember.

3 Requirements: All work must pass with a 75% or better. 1. Each chapter requires a set of answers to the given questions. The answers need to be written in complete sentences (this means including the questions with in the answers). 2. Each chapter has vocabulary words that have three requirements. Please read the directions on the vocabulary page. 3. There is a required activity to be done once the book is completed. 4. A Final is required to complete the book requirements. Please note; all written materials must be: In Microsoft Word, Spell and grammar checked Written in complete sentences (including spelling definitions) Sent in electronically to your teacher. Please save your work frequently and save a copy for yourself.

4 Chapter I 1. Describe Malachy McCourts, Franks father, life before the birth of his children? 2. Descibe Angela Sheehans, Franks mother, life before the birth of her children? 3. What difficulties and joys did Frank experience in his early childhood? 4. Who is Margaret? What does she convince Malachy to do? What happens to her? How does this impact Angela and her children? 5. How do the McCourts end up back in Ireland?

5 Chapter I Vocabulary: Write the definition of each word, follow it by writing the sentence it is used in in the book, and then create a sentence of your own using the same meaning. pp woescharwoman loquaciousnovena piousskivvies pompousspeakeasy cacophonygullet consumptionatrocious catarrhpram nettlesconsecrated stout

6 Chapter II 1. How does Malachys family welcome the McCourts? 2. When Malachy takes Frank to the office of the man in charge of the IRA pension claims, what response does he get? 3. How does Angelas family welcome the McCourts? 4. Describe the sleeping arrangements and conditions on Windmill Street. 5. How do the McCourts get money for food? 6. In this chapter, many tragedies befall the McCourts…what are they? 7. How does Angela protect the dole from being spent on alcohol? Why does this shame Malachy?

7 Chapter II Vocabulary: Write the definition of each word, follow it by writing the sentence it is used in in the book, and then create a sentence of your own using the same meaning. pp cavortingshilling frenzywelt fortnightimmortal docketasylum porridgeturf doleringworm cossackqueue jackdawparaffin

8 Chapter III 1. What is unusual about the bathroom situation in the place the McCourts move to? 2. Why did the public assistant money get reduced for the McCourts? 3. What is Malachy Sr.s attitude about what money goes for food and what money goes for the bar? 4. Why do you think he feels this way?(accept all answers) 5. How is the McCourts poverty played out at Christmas time? 6. Franks father is disgusted that Frank had to carry the head home. He considers carrying things through the streets undignified, and refuses to do it himself. Why would this act be thought of as undignified? 7. What is wrong with the new baby and how does Franks father save it? 8. Frank talks about the unemployed men in Limerick. Who is he comparing this to? What would be the contrast to these men? 9. Frank describes a very typical stage of adolescence when he gets frustrated with his father at church. What stage is this? 10. Things start to look up for the McCourts when Malachy Sr. get a job. What behavior does he demonstrates that is so common with alcoholics when they finally get a good job after not having one for some time? 11. How does Malachy Sr. sabotage the potential change for the good?

9 Chapter III Vocabulary: Write the definition of each word, follow it by writing the sentence it is used in in the book, and then create a sentence of your own using the same meaning. pp lavatory slather affliction sneer

10 Chapter IV 1.Mikeys mother, Nora, is often admitted to the lunatic asylum, why? 2.What does Nora do before she is taken away? Why? 3.What caused Mikey to not be a proper Catholic? 4.What does Mr. Benson teach? 5.Why is one boy in Mr. Bensons class named Brendan Question Quigley? 6.What did Frank recall about the day he found a raisin in his pastry at school? 7.Mikey tells his friends about the great Cuchulains wife, Emer. What was she known for? 8.Frank worries that he has committed a terrible sin by listening to the above tale and asks the Angel on the Seventh Step what to do. What is the Angels response? 9.When Frank returns to his grandmothers house, he eats breakfast and then throws it up in her backyard. This causes Grandma to fret about what? Why does she think this? 10. Why is the priest amused when he tells Frank how to resolve his problem?

11 Chapter IV Vocabulary: Write the definition of each word, follow it by writing the sentence it is used in in the book, and then create a sentence of your own using the same meaning. pp bawlcatechism ravenousblaguard martyrbog galoreerupt diversion

12 1. What is the explanation that Frank uses to explain the snubs and silent treatments that are a constant presence in his neighborhood? 2. Why are the Protestants called soupers? 3. Describe the differences in communication between the McCourts family members and Bridey Hannons family members? 4. A Protestant man, Bill Galvin, moves into Franks grandmothers house on the advice of Uncle Pat. Angela persuades her mother to let Frank deliver Bills lunch every day at the limekiln. How does Franks lack of food sabotage this and what is the consequence? 5. What prompted the doctor to remove Franks tonsils? 6. Malachy forces Frank to confess what sins to a priest? 7. Three years pass and still Malachy has no work; why is this? 8. Franks prefect attendance as a member of the Confraternity causes Declan Collopy to infer what about Franks future employment? Why? 9. What does McCourts economic status prevent Frank from being able to do? 10. How does this affect Malachys relationship with his son? Chapter V

13 Chapter V Vocabulary: Write the definition of each word, follow it by writing the sentence it is used in in the book, and then create a sentence of your own using the same meaning. pp souperdemolish coddleclout bansheetonsils adenoidsgramophone waddle ³eejit² jigabomination linoleumchalice canister

14 Chapter VI 1. At school, Frank is now in the fourth form. What do you think the word form means? 2. Why does Frank describe Fintan Slattery as a dandified do-gooder? 3. How does Fintan get the boys to come over to his house? 4. How does Frank end up at Paddys house to spend the night? 5. What kind of conditions does Paddy live in? 6. What do you think consumption means? 7. What is the connection between Mr. Clohessy and Angela?

15 Chapter VI Vocabulary: Write the definition of each word, follow it by writing the sentence it is used in in the book, and then create a sentence of your own using the same meaning. pp mooch grate

16 Chapter VII 1. How does the family treat Malachy when he drinks away his dole money? 2. Why is this type of response unhealthy for the children? 3. Another interesting unhealthy outlook on life is described in this chapter when the situation of Mickeys siblings dying from consumption is shared and everyones looking at the deaths as a time to manipulate getting out of school. Then Frank is pleased when Mickey die and cant get off from school. What has caused this callouse response to pain and suffering from Frank and the other children? 4. Explain the trials of Franks newspaper job. 5. Frank finally finds a companion and role model in Mr. Timoney. Sadly, even that is taken away from him when Mr. Timoney is determined demented. What was odd about that particular determination? 6. Again, the children of Malachy are put into a position of parenting their father. They are also caught between their mother and their fathers behavior. Why cant this conflict be won by the boys? 7. Why does the priest say he (the priest) should be washing the feet of those he hears confess, not doling out penances? 8. What do you think is causing the raging inside of Frank? 9. Why does Frank think that Malachys drinking behaviors will change this time? 10. Why is this thinking irrational?

17 Chapter VII Vocabulary: Write the definition of each word, follow it by writing the sentence it is used in in the book, and then create a sentence of your own using the same meaning. pp toffee flail

18 Chapter VIII 1. Why is Peter Dooley called Quasimodo? 2. What illness does Frank get that almost kills him? Just like when Frank thought his father would never drink again because of doing such an unethical thing such as stealing money from a baby; Frank decides he will live because …? 3. Why do you think that Franks reaction to his father kissing him was so euphoric? 4. Described Franks reaction to reading Shakespeare. 5. What is ironic about the way the nurses treat Patricia? 6. What starts Frank loving to read? 7. How did Frank get moved from the fifth form up to the sixth form? 8. Explain why you think Frank is getting confused emotions about his father. 9. Two situations take place the starts to show Frank that the English may not be as bad as he has been led to believe, what are they?

19 Chapter VIII Vocabulary: Write the definition of each word, follow it by writing the sentence it is used in in the book, and then create a sentence of your own using the same meaning. pp gawking diphtheria typhoid blather marmalade magistrate scour lorry

20 Chapter IX-X 1. Explain the impact of Angelas refusal to have any more children. 2. How did the beginning one WWII benefit the poor in Ireland? 3. What theme is repeated when Malachy goes off to England to earn money from the war? 4. Even as poor as they are, Angela stills sees her familys situation better than some; what reasoning does she use? 5. Ignorance plays a large part in the belief system of the poor and often encourages behaviors that keep the poor from having the skill sets to improve their status. What ignorant belief does the Grandmother have about Franks conjunctivitis that could keep him poor ? 6. What other benefit does Frank get from reading? 7. Why do the people who have to ask for help, laugh at their situations when belittled and insulted for asking for help? 8. Frank takes charge of feeding the family when Angela gets very sick. How does Malachy rationalize Franks stealing?

21 Chapter IX-X Vocabulary: Write the definition of each word, follow it by writing the sentence it is used in in the book, and then create a sentence of your own using the same meaning. CHAPTER 9: pp munitionstongs triflefamished tinkerknackered orphanagefasting conjunctivitissquander CHAPTER 10: pp lamentationcoal scuttle damperwoeful

22 Chapter XI-XII 1. What inspired the name of Franks soccer team, The Red Hearts of Limerick? 2. Finding his mother and fathers wedding certificate turns out to be trouble for Frank. What implications did it have and why? 3. Mr. Hannons introduction into Franks life has two important outcomes on Franks emotional growth. Discuss them. 4. Mr. Hannon also offers Frank his first taste of a potential future. What is it that Mr. Hannon says? 5. Mr. Hannon, also, shares the way out of poverty. The very same way it is today. What is it? 6. Explain your thoughts on this statement, For the most part, class divisions are carved in stone, that if you are born poor you stay poor, and that hard work will not change your fate 7. Once again, Frank is connected to thoughts of English and America. How does Mrs. Purcell influence this? 8. How has Franks and his brothers feelings toward their father changed?

23 Chapter XI-XII Vocabulary: Write the definition of each word, follow it by writing the sentence it is used in in the book, and then create a sentence of your own using the same meaning. CHAPTER 11: pp doom CHAPTER 12: pp arrears sizzle rugby gallivanting maggots

24 Chapter XIII-XIV 1. What type of measures does Frank have to go to, to earn the cycling trip he wants to go on with his friends from school? 2. One day at the library, the librarian gives Frank a book called Butlers Lives of the Saints. What about this book, does Frank find so fascinating? 3. The librarian, Miss O Riordan, is so impressed by Franks supposed religious zeal that she writes to congratulate Angela on her son. What did Frank do that gave her the impression that he was religiously zealous? _ 4. Why did Angela takes Frank to the Christian Brothers and what happened? 5. What employment did Frank get at this stage of his life? 6. What was Mr. OHallorans purpose for telling Frank that he needs to leave for America? 7. Do you agree with this statement and why or why not? 8. Why does Frank feel guilty about refusing to go home? 9. Why is Angela staying with someone like Laman who treats her children so bad? 10. Frank is struggling with two major character issues; one is around his sinning and the other is around his ways of getting food. Uncle Ab refuses to give Frank food, so Frank steals milk and bread from wealthy houses. He concludes that since he is doomed for his sins anyway, a few more will not make any difference. Still, he feels that he is little more than a beggar, standing outside stores and asking for leftover fish and chips. Why arent these accurate assumptions about his character? 11. How does Frank feel about finding out about intercourse? 12. What other areas do we lie to protect our children? Explain why you feel this is good or bad?

25 Chapter XIII-XIV Vocabulary: Write the definition of each word, follow it by writing the sentence it is used in in the book, and then create a sentence of your own using the same meaning. CHAPTER 13: pp inviolateheathen gangrenefester perfidioussuccumb vileobituary smidgen CHAPTER 14: pp squander sanitarium

26 Chapter XV-XVI 1. The beginning of his new job is difficult of Frank as he continues to encounter cruel behavior placed on him by poverty. What happens? 2. What circumstances provided economic relief to Paddy Clohessys mother? 3. Mrs. Clohessy makes a comment regarding Hitler saving her life. Why is this an oxymoron? 4. When is it that Frank makes a crucial realization that he must save part of the money he earns or else face remaining in Limerick forever? 5. The thinking of his future instead of his physical wants demonstrates what about Franks maturation? 6. What makes this a passage into adult thinking? 7. Hypocrisy rules its ugly head again when Frank realizes that the only people who tip the telegram boys are widows, the poor, and the wives of Protestant ministers. Rich people dont tip, and neither do nuns or priests. Some of the people to whom Frank delivers telegrams are so old and sick that they cannot get out of bed. There are two strong hypocritical points here; one economic and the other ethical. What are they? 8. There is a purpose to describing Franks first sexual experience. What could be the inner meaning the author wants to expose in this passage? 9. Harrington stuffs a ham sandwich in Franks mouth, and Frank vomits out the window onto Mrs. Harringtons rosebushes. the symbolism of this act may represent what about the impoverished and the rich? 10. What common relationship do Pa Keating, Mr. Timoney, and Mr. OHalloran have with Frank? 11. Based on the encouragement of these three men, Frank does what? Do you think this way a good idea and why?

27 Chapter XV-XVI Vocabulary: Write the definition of each word, follow it by writing the sentence it is used in in the book, and then create a sentence of your own using the same meaning. CHAPTER 15: pp quaffreeking abscessledger pensiondint perseveranceassiduity populace CHAPTER 17: pp repentancetabernacle twinekiosk brawnfeeble freemasondemented CHAPTER 18: pp boomerangeclipse

28 Character List Character List: Briefly describe each character. 1. Frank McCourt 2. Angela McCourt 3. Malachy McCourt (Sr.) 4. Malachy McCourt (Jr.) 5. Oliver & Eugene McCourt6. Michael McCourt 7. Alphie McCourt8. Aunt Aggie 9. Pa Keating Ab Sheehan 11. Grandma 12. Laman Griffin 13. The MacNamara sisters 15. Mr. Timoney 16. bTheresa Carmody 17. The Hannons 18. Patricia Madigan 19. Seamus20. Mrs. Brigid Finucane 21. Mr. McCaffrey 22. The Molloys 23. Billy Campbell 24. Paddy Clohessy 25. Mr. OHalloran 26. Peter Dooley

29 Themes Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work. Theme One: The Limitations Imposed by Class Because of social snobbery, Frank is unfairly denied many opportunities. Although he is an intelligent, quick-witted, and eager student, he is prevented from becoming an altar boy and deprived of chances to further his education, because when people see him dressed in rags, they shun him. Franks natural fighting instincts and the encouragement of a few family members help him to oppose and overcome the limits set by his low-class status. Even small victories, such as beating a team of wealthy boys in a soccer game, help to bolster Franks self-esteem. As the memoir progresses; Frank grows determined to prove that he can succeed and earn peoples respect. In particular, he looks to America as a classless society where his ambitions will be realized and his talents rewarded, despite his lower-class upbringing. Some might view Franks vision of America a classless society as idealistic, since class consciousness pervades American society as well. Even so, McCourts success as a teacher, performer, and world-renowned author stands as a testament to his ability to surmount the impediments of class, and to the society that made his idealistic dream a reality beyond hisor anyonesgreatest expectations. What kind of limitations do you feel are placed on you at your class level? What are ways you can surmount the impediments of class?

30 Themes Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work. Theme Two: Hunger Frank is plagued by hunger throughout his childhood. The McCourts never have enough food to eat, and the food they do manage to procure is scant and unsatisfying. Hunger is mentioned over and over again until it becomes a haunting presence in the narrative. Franks father often drinks away the money the family needs for food, and comes home wailing about the plight of Ireland and the Irish. Franks mother realizes the pettiness of patriotism compared to the very real hunger her children suffer on a daily basis. When her husband sings songs about suffering Ireland, she responds, Ireland can kiss my arse. Frank then observes, Food on the table is what she wants, not suffering Ireland. Food assumes a symbolic as well as a practical value in the memoir. Frank starts to associate feeling satiated with feeling like an independent and successful member of society. Franks need for food is thus more than physical: he craves the self-esteem and freedom that come with being able to eat what he wants. Frank is unwilling to appear needy or to appeal to other peoples charitable instincts to satisfy his hunger. In fact, he would rather steal than beg to survive. Once, when Malachy brings home a weeks pay, Frank notices how his mother can again hold her head up in the grocery and pay the man behind the counter. Theres nothing worse in the world, he muses, than to owe and be beholden to anyone. Here once more we see how the ability to pay for ones food brings dignity and self-respect. What are other things in life you feel are just as important as being able to pay and not owing anyone anything that brings about respect and value in our community and society?

31 Motifs Motifs are recurring structures, contrasts, or literary devices that can help to develop and inform the texts major themes. Motif One: Anti-English Sentiment In the opening lines of his memoir, McCourt ascribes some of the sorrow he endured as a child to the English and the terrible things they did to us for eight hundred long years. Most of the adult characters in the memoir condemn past English invasions of Ireland and contemporary English repression of the Irish. Frank is brought up assuming that the English are essentially immoral and evil. He is taught from the start that Ireland thrived before the English came and spoiled their way of life. Once, when his father is outside trying to beat the fleas out of a mattress, a passerby watches and says that there were no fleas in ancient Irelandthe English brought them over to drive the Irish out of our wits entirely. I wouldnt put it past the English, he adds. A revealing turn occurs when Frank hears Mr. OHalloran say that the Irish, as well as the English, committed atrocities in battle. From this point on, Frank starts to question the assumption that Irishmen versus Englishmen means good versus evil. What are similar cultures that have this type of mindset about their struggles?

32 Motifs Motifs are recurring structures, contrasts, or literary devices that can help to develop and inform the texts major themes. Motif Two: Guilt Throughout his childhood, Frank is burdened by guilt at his own sinfulness, particularly the sinfulness of his sexual thoughts and behavior. He frequently worries that he is damned or that he has damned other people. McCourt suggests that his guilt results primarily from his Catholicism. In the days of Franks childhood, priests tirelessly cautioned against the evils of masturbation and sextheir admonishments haunt Franks thoughts. As he matures, Frank learns to use Confession to relieve himself of guilt, and he stops feeling doomed by his natural sexual impulses. What are other areas of our lives that we might feel guilt about that might derive from the way we are raised?

33 Symbols Symbols are objects, characters, figures, or colors used to represent abstract ideas or concepts. Symbol One: The River Shannon The symbolism of the River Shannon changes as Franks outlook matures during his childhood and adolescence. Initially, the river symbolizes Limericks bleakness and the brooding desolation of Franks childhood. Frank associates the river with the endless rain that torments Limerick, which he describes as a virulent disease-carrying wetness that causes people to fall sick with coughs, asthma, consumption, and other diseases. As the memoir progresses, Frank begins to see the river as a route out of Limerick. As a result, what does the river come to symbolize?

34 Symbols Symbols are objects, characters, figures, or colors used to represent abstract ideas or concepts. Symbol Two: Ashes Angelas Ashes takes its name from the ashes which fall from Angelas cigarettes and those in the fireplace at which she stares blankly. The entire setting of the narrative feels draped in ashdark, decrepit, weak, lifeless, sunless. Angelas ashes represent:

35 Symbols Symbols are objects, characters, figures, or colors used to represent abstract ideas or concepts. Symbol Three: Eggs Unlike other families, the McCourts cannot afford to buy eggs regularly. Eggs are a familiar yet unattainable luxury, and Frank associates them with wealth and security. What do the eggs become symbols of ?

36 Choose a project from the Project Table and turn in into your teacher. Please remember that you cannot do a project that you have previously done for another book.


Download ppt "By Frank McCourt. This novel revolves around the penniless childhood of Frank McCourt. It begins in America with four-year-old Frank, his three year-old."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google