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Derby and District Organists Association Exploring a Pipe Organ with CATO Children and the Organ Project.

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Presentation on theme: "Derby and District Organists Association Exploring a Pipe Organ with CATO Children and the Organ Project."— Presentation transcript:

1 Derby and District Organists Association Exploring a Pipe Organ with CATO Children and the Organ Project

2 The organ can make so many different types of sound, it can be used in a wide variety of ways from joyful celebrations to sad occasions. Here are some words describing organ sounds:

3 Choose three words to describe the sort of music you would expect to hear in CAROL SINGING. Suggest your own words.

4 Choose three words to describe the sort of music you would expect to hear at a WEDDING. Suggest your own words.

5 Choose three words to describe the sort of music you would expect to hear at a MEMORIAL SERVICE. Suggest your own words.

6 Choose three words to describe the sort of music you would expect to hear at a CORONATION. Suggest your own words.

7 An organ can make a wide variety of different sounds by using the stops to choose different ranks of pipes. The type of sound tone made by a rank of pipes depends mainly upon the shape of the pipes and the type of material used in making them. Some pipes are made of wood, others are made of metal. For metal pipes, the tone is generally brighter and louder than wooden pipes.

8 In the picture, how many ranks of pipes are made of wood and how many of metal? Hint: Most ranks of pipes are arranged in two rows.

9 What types of metal are used for making organ pipes? Need help? Click on Ollie.

10 Here are some other uses of metals that are used for making organ pipes.

11 Describe the different shapes of pipe in the picture.

12 Factors which affect the tone of the sound produced by a pipe: Material used for making the pipe Shape of the pipe Pressure of air entering the pipe Speed of the air-flow into the pipe Wood Lead Tin Zinc The organ builder uses all of these factors to control the sound made by a pipe. With different designs of pipes, you can make a great variety of tones: soft, loud, bright, mellow and many more.

13 Here are the shapes of pipe you are most likely to find in an organ.

14 Wooden pipes are used to make sweet, softer sounds.

15 If the pipe is fat, it makes a mellow sound compared with a thinner pipe which tends to be brighter.

16 The wooden pipes with a stopper in the end make a note which is an octave lower than normal. This helps to save space, since the pipes only need to be half the normal length.

17 Metal pipes tend to make louder sounds. The thinner they are then the brighter they sound. The fatter pipes have a bolder tone.

18 Some pipes do not have a mouth for making the sound. Instead they have a metal reed hidden inside the foot of the pipe. As the air makes the reed to vibrate, the pipe makes a very strong sound which sometimes can be very loud indeed.

19 Try to match a pipe number to this description: OPEN DIAPASON – Bold, rich tone

20 Try to match a pipe number to this description: VIOLA – String tone

21 Try to match a pipe number to this description: FLUTE – Sweet tone

22 Try to match a pipe number to this description: TRUMPET – Sharp loud tone

23 Combining pipes to make new sounds When two pipes are made to sound at the same time, the sounds combine to produce a new tone. Its a bit like mixing colours to make new colours. Just two pipes are enough to create new tones. The player must select stops so that two or more ranks of pipes sound together.

24 Combining pipes to make new sounds There are several ways of combining stops: 1. Choose extra stops at the same pitch. 2. Choose extra stops that sound at a higher pitch. 8 ft stops sound at normal pitch 4 ft stops sound an octave higher 2 ft stops sound two octaves higher 2 2/3 ft stops sound twelve notes higher. Usually, you must have at least one 8 foot stop at normal pitch. Then you can add a 4 foot or a 2 foot or 2 2/3 foot stop or all of them. Point at the stops to show what they do.

25 Combining pipes to make new sounds Work out how many combinations you can make from the four stops shown. Remember, for each combination, you should use the 8 foot stop at normal pitch to give a foundation.

26 Combining pipes to make new sounds What combination would you use for accompanying lots of people singing a hymn?

27 What have you learned? Organ tones have lots of variety for different moods and occasions. The tone of a pipe is affected by its material, shape and the air flow. Wooden pipes make a mellow sound. New sounds can be created by combining stops at the same or different pitches. Metal pipes make a bright sound.

28 Materials prepared by Laurence Rogers for the Children and the Organ Project Team: Stephen Johns James Muckle Edmund Stow Gillian Chatto Laurence Rogers John Forster Chris Darrall Sponsored by Derby and District Organists Association

29 Children and the Organ Project The project aims to introduce young children to the fascinating world of pipe organs through practical workshops and fun activities. The building and playing of organs being such multi- disciplinary activities, their study has numerous spin-offs for the school curriculum. For more information, visit our website:

30 Copyright notice Copyright owner:Derby & District Organists Association This PowerPoint presentation and the accompanying worksheets are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Licence The work may be copied by not-for-profit organisations for educational use, provided due attribution to the copyright owner is given. Commercial use of the materials is prohibited. To view a copy of the licence, visit:

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