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Transgender in State The Improbable Adventures of a Transgender Foreign Service Bicyclist Across Time (Zones), Continents, and Cultures Origin of name.

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Presentation on theme: "Transgender in State The Improbable Adventures of a Transgender Foreign Service Bicyclist Across Time (Zones), Continents, and Cultures Origin of name."— Presentation transcript:

1 Transgender in State The Improbable Adventures of a Transgender Foreign Service Bicyclist Across Time (Zones), Continents, and Cultures Origin of name  play on words Lying in state is a term used to describe the tradition in which a coffin is placed on view to allow the public at large to pay their respects to the deceased. Not too dissimilar to what I have had to do in placing my “former self” on view for family and friends. Even for those who have accepted my transition have had to go through a mourning period. (Lying in Repose since not in an official state building?) Hubble Deep Field Robyn McCutcheon Tirana LGBT Conference 14-15 June 2012

2 Cliff Darby, Mary Galloway, John Kucel, & Steve Beckwith.
Note only the director is wearing a tie. A nice thing about tech is that I hardly ever had to put on a suit and tie. It’s just that no one suspected that I had an extra reason for not wanting to wear one.

3 As for the usefulness of a transsexual in space, I think this is self-evident I know about Gus Grissom and how his capsule sank. Man, you guys have had a rough time of it, haven't you? First Shepard peeing in his pants, then Grissom sinking the capsule. A transsexual wouldn't have blown the explosive bolts off her capsule prematurely, I can promise you that! Most of us, alas, spend most of our lives trying to keep our explosive bolts from blowing -- and as a result, are extraordinarily well suited at withstanding nearly unbearable pressure. Everyone says I was “a first.” Well, I grew up with the space program. Love of the beauty of the night sky gave me my first career. Does that mean I’m a “first” like Alan Shepard, Valentina Tereshkova, or Sally Ride? I rather like that analogy. Jennifer Finney Boylan, author and transgender advocate, also grew up with the space program. She wrote an open letter to NASA asking to be the first transsexual in space. Like many transgender persons of my generation in the US, I got through by socially acceptable self-medication: academics and career. It’s just that this outwardly successful person was miserable inside and made others miserable through her distance.

4 WHO WERE THE PIONEERS WHO LED THE WAY?
WHO DESIGNED THE ROCKET THAT ALLOWED ME TO BECOME THE FIRST U.S. FOREIGN SERVICE OFFICER TO TRANSITION GENDER AT AN OVERSEAS POST? Hermann Oberth, Wernher von Braun, Sergey Korolev, and Robert Goddard. WHO WERE THE PIONEERS WHO LED THE WAY?

5 Diane Schroer vs. Library of Congress
THE RESULT? Sharon McGowan, Attorney with the ACLU’s Gay and Lesbian Rights Project represented Diane. VICTORY! On September 19, 2008, a federal district judge ruled that the Library of Congress illegally discriminated against Schroer, in a groundbreaking decision that found that discriminating against someone for changing genders is sex discrimination under federal law. On April 28, 2009, the judge ordered the government to pay nearly $500,000 in compensation for the discrimination, which was the maximum he could award in the case. Diane Schroer was a highly decorated Airborne Ranger Special Forces officer. She began taking steps to transition from male to female shortly after retiring as a Colonel after 25 years of distinguished service. Diane Schroer was a highly decorated Airborne Ranger Special Forces officer. She began taking steps to transition from male to female shortly after retiring as a Colonel after 25 years of distinguished service. In 2005, Diane interviewed for, was offered, and accepted a job as a terrorism research analyst at the Library of Congress, but when she told her future supervisor that she was in the process of gender transition, the Library rescinded the offer. On September 19, 2008, a federal district judge ruled that the Library of Congress illegally discriminated against Schroer, in a groundbreaking decision that found that discriminating against someone for changing genders is sex discrimination under federal law. On April 28, 2009, the judge ordered the government to pay nearly $500,000 in compensation for the discrimination, which was the maximum he could award in the case. In 2005, Diane interviewed for, was offered, and accepted a job as a terrorism research analyst at the Library of Congress, but when she told her future supervisor that she was in the process of gender transition, the Library rescinded the offer. SHE DIDN’T TAKE IT LYING DOWN. SHE FOUGHT BACK !

6 But who led the way in Foreign Affairs Agencies?
In the beginning it was a very personal journey, the journey of two individuals, Chloe Schwenke and Ajit Joshi. But who led the way in Foreign Affairs Agencies? At the time Ajit Joshi was GLIFAA policy director and a program officer in USAID’s Democracy, Conflict, Humanitarian Assistance Bureau. In July 2008 he received word that a contract employee working for USAID would shortly announce that she would be bringing her body into alignment with her brain. That person was Dr. Chloe Schwenke, who announced her transition in September in a moving letter to friends and colleagues. Ajit now had the very real question before him of what he could do to ease Chloe's workplace transition. No one at USAID or in any other foreign affairs agency that we know of had ever transitioned gender before. Everything had to be considered. What would Chloe's transition do to health insurance coverage and other employee benefits both for herself and for her spouse and children? How would her colleagues react? How would even something as basic as bathroom access issues be addressed? For USAID everything about Chloe's transition was unprecedented.

7 If ever fate played a hand in the lives of two people and in the development of GLIFAA, the State Department, and the entire U.S. foreign affairs community, it did so in 2008 when it brought together Chloe Schwenke and Ajit Joshi. After Chloe’s workplace transition at USAID, she and Ajit worked closely together on transgender issues through the fall of 2008 and throughout GLIFAA president Bob Gilchrist joined forces with them to lead the charge to expand GLIFAA’s efforts on behalf of transgender personnel and press to include gender identity in the Department of State's non-discrimination/EEO statements. “First we had to educate our membership on how transgender concerns differ from those of LGB members -- there was still a lack of understanding even within our organization,” said Gilchrist. Also key at the time was GLIFAA member Anna McCrery, a cisgender policy consultant who had worked extensively on transgender issues. Behind the scenes, Chloe, Ajit, Anna, and Bob worked tirelessly to garner support. The culmination of GLIFAA's efforts came on June 22, 2010, when Secretary Clinton announced at the State Department LGBT Pride event that the Department was rewriting its EEO policy to include explicitly gender identity, becoming the first cabinet-level agency to do so. USAID's Anthony Cotton continued the work by coordinating the efforts of multiple agencies and departments to update their EEO policy statements. Anthony authored a 15-page resource packet that has been instrumental in helping federal agencies and departments update their policy statements. As of early 2012, at least 19 federal organizations have adopted gender identity protections.

8 And then there was Samia
Samia Bhatti is a member of the Locally Employed Staff in Islamabad. In 2009 she approached GLIFAA post representative Erin Krassik for help with her transition. With financial support from GLIFAA members and others from the worldwide LGBT community, Samia journeyed to Thailand for Gender Confirmation Surgery in 2011 and again in 2012 for Facial Feminization Surgery . Today Samia is active in outreach to the transgender community in Pakistan.

9 And where was I when Diane Schroer won her case?
Where was I when Chloe Schwenke became the first USAID employee to announce that she would transition gender? Where was I gender identity was added to the State Department’s Statement on Discriminatory and Sexual Harassment? And where was I when Diane Schroer won her case? Where was I when Chloe Schwenke became the first USAID employee to announce that she would transition gender? Where was I gender identity was added to the State Department’s Statement on Discriminatory and Sexual Harassment?

10 I was in cotton-pickin’ Uzbekistan!

11 I had no idea of the tremendous changes taking place at State and within GLIFAA

12 Are you ready to hear my story?
Are you ready to hear my story? Read my web journal! This web journal has been my “lying in state” for family and friends, my way of telling them my story from overseas after the initial stunned phone calls, s, and meetings. That’s how it began, but it has since gotten a wider readership.

13 So how far back does this go?
(Reader’s Digest Abridged Version, Part I) Oh, let’s say about to the time of President Kennedy’s inaugural. By the time Project Gemini began, I had the conscious knowledge that I was different . . . . . . and that I couldn’t tell a soul. Oh, let’s say about to the time of President Kennedy’s inaugural By the time Project Gemini began, I had the conscious knowledge that I was different . . . By the time Project Gemini began, I had the conscious knowledge that I was different and couldn’t tell a soul. When Neil Armstrong set foot on the Moon, I was secretly cross dressing regularly but in despair as my body began to change in ways I did not want it to. When Neil Armstrong set foot on the Moon, I was secretly cross dressing regularly but in despair as my body began to change in ways I did not want it to.

14 I PURGED So how far back does this go?
(Reader’s Digest Abridged Version, Part II) In college I dressed publicly but invisibly in my night job and came to understand I was not the only person like myself in the world. I devoured every piece of literature I could find on transsexuality and started corresponding with the gender identity clinic at Johns Hopkins Medical Center. In college I dressed publicly but invisibly in my night job and came to understand I was not the only person like myself in the world. Read Jan Morris’s Conundrum. I devoured every piece of literature I could find on transsexuality and started corresponding with the gender identity clinic at Johns Hopkins Medical Center. But in the end I was too terrified to do anything. But in the end I was too terrified to do anything. I PURGED

15 Couldn’t deal with my personal self-imposed repression.
Instead, consciously threw myself into another MA degree in Soviet Affairs. Wrote a 400-page MA thesis on the purge of Soviet astronomers, got an IREX grant to work in the archives in Leningrad, and wrote numerous articles for both popular and academic journals. Went to numerous astronomical and historical conferences. “Astronomy and the State: U.S. and Russian Perspectives” in 1995. Did this while maintaining a full-time job working for CSC, a NASA contractor at GSFC. In other words, I added a double dose of my self-medication of choice: work. Humorous note: “Welcome Repression Workshop,” Univ. of TX at Austin in 1986.

16 So how far back does this go?
(Reader’s Digest Abridged Version, Part III) Never having dated, in 1982 I married a friend who proposed to me. Like Jenny Boylan, I thought that perhaps “love will cure me.” I said nothing, hoping it would go away. In 1990, three months after the launch of Hubble, I could no longer bear the pressure of having kept a secret my entire life. The result of opening up was disastrous: a week in a psychiatric ward, not atypical in those days. Never having dated, in 1982 I married a friend – grad student from South American country -- who proposed to me. Like Jenny Boylan, I thought that perhaps “love will cure me.” I said nothing, hoping it would go away. It didn’t. So yes, I did deceive my spouse, and she sensed something was not right from the start. The intimacy was not there. In 1990, three months after the launch of Hubble, I could no longer bear the pressure of having kept a secret my entire life. The result of opening up was disastrous: a week in a psychiatric ward, not atypical in those days. Both spouse and sisters thought I had gone out of my mind. Deirdre McCloskey, well-known economist at the University of Iowa, had an even worse experience during her coming-out in 1995. The psychiatrist who treated me prescribed antidepressants, saying there is no such thing as a transsexual. I accepted the diagnosis to preserve a now very troubled marriage in which the one treasure was our two-year-old son. My one salvation was the bicycle. The psychiatrist who treated me prescribed antidepressants, saying there is no such thing as a transsexual. I accepted the diagnosis to preserve a now very troubled marriage in which the one treasure was our two-year-old son.

17 So how far back does this go?
(Reader’s Digest Abridged Version, Part IV) In I tried again to speak openly and find some measure of peace with almost equally disastrous results. I was now certain that someday my headstone would be inscribed with the words Kept the Secret Until the End. Good Show and Goodbye. My universe only began to change when I joined the Foreign Service in 2004. In I tried again to speak openly and find some measure of peace with almost equally disastrous results. I was now certain that someday my headstone would be inscribed with the words Kept the Secret Until the End. Good Show and Goodbye. My universe only began to change when I joined the Foreign Service in 2004. My spouse opted not to go overseas with me. It was the beginning of separate lives. With our son now in college, I asked for a divorce in The divorce became final when I returned from Uzbekistan in the summer of 2010, but litigation continued into 2011. The litigation was taking a tremendous toll on my work as Econ officer in Tashkent. For that reason, when in 2009 I bid for my follow-on assignment, I looked for a low-key, low stress position that would allow me to devote myself to the stress of the divorce. I chose to do a technical tour, knowing I could do that job with one hand behind my back. My spouse opted not to go overseas with me. It was the beginning of separate lives. With our son now in college, I asked for a divorce in The divorce became final when I returned from Uzbekistan in the summer of 2010, but litigation continued into 2011.

18 But sometimes nothing left to lose is freedom.
2010 Home Leave in Maine I climbed Kathadin, forced a smile for the camera, and surveyed the wreckage of a life. I had lost almost everything material that one spends a life building. When I arrived in Bucharest on a rainy October day, my fourth lifetime attempt to come out openly as transgender had already begun. My big secret had played a big role in my divorce and was becoming known to more than just a small closed circle. I climbed Kathadin, forced a smile for the camera, and surveyed the wreckage of a life. I had lost almost everything material that one spends a life building. My legal bill was already over $30,000, reaching $70,000 before it was over. My big secret had played a big role in my divorce and was becoming known to more than just a small closed circle. I assumed it was only a matter of time before I would be curtailed as unsuitable and join the unemployed transgender population. Up until then that was standard practice. I knew nothing of gender identity being added to the Department’s Statement on Discriminatory and Sexual Harassment that summer. But sometimes nothing left to lose is freedom. When I arrived in Bucharest on a rainy October day, my fourth lifetime attempt to come out openly as transgender had already begun. I assumed it was only a matter of time before I would be curtailed as unsuitable and join the unemployed transgender population.

19 "Kyna, I need to talk with you about something."
Sometimes it takes just one person, a few words, and a hug to change a life.  For me, that person was Kyna. The hug and the words were hers. It was a late November day, and I had come to see Kyna in the Embassy's MED unit.  I was nervous, and I'm sure Kyna sensed it.  She closed the door, sat me down, and listened as no one had ever listened to me before.  It all came pouring out:  my childhood dream, the story of my growing up, everything I had kept inside in 1975, my marriage, my trying to come out in 1990 and landing in a psychiatric ward instead, the story of   Sometimes it takes just one person, a few words, and a hug to change a life.  For me, that person was Kyna. The hug and the words were hers. "Kyna, I need to talk with you about something."  It was a late November day, and I had come to see Kyna in the Embassy's MED unit.  I was nervous, and I'm sure Kyna sensed it.  She closed the door, sat me down, and listened as no one had ever listened to me before.  It all came pouring out:  my childhood dream, the story of my growing up, everything I had kept inside in 1975, my marriage, my trying to come out in 1990 and landing in a psychiatric ward instead, the story of   When I was done, Kyna's words were, "You need the biggest hug I can give you."  She wasn't appalled.  There was no talk of sending me back to the US. (Note that Kyna went next to Islamabad, where she came to know Samia.) When I was done, Kyna's words were, "You need the biggest hug I can give you."  She wasn't appalled.  There was no talk of sending me back to the US.  

20 The Education of a Transgender Rip Van Winkle
In 1975 I had read Jan Morris' Conundrum and had spent every spare moment reading anything I could about transsexualism.  Then I purged and purged as completely as I could.  I put myself into a deep transgender slumber. If a transgender story appeared in the newspaper, I did not read it.  If there was a report on the TV news, I changed the channel. I remained in purposeful hibernation, avoiding anything and everything that had a transgender theme.  In 1975 I had read Jan Morris' Conundrum and had spent every spare moment reading anything I could about transsexualism.  I had reached out to the gender clinic at Hopkins. Then I purged and purged as completely as I could.  I put myself into a deep transgender slumber. If a transgender story appeared in the newspaper, I did not read it.  If there was a report on the TV news, I changed the channel. I remained in that purposeful hibernation, avoiding anything and everything that had a transgender theme.  So here I was, yawning, stretching, and rubbing my eyes in December 2010.  Kyna confessed to knowing little or nothing about transgender issues, but she gave me a start with LGBT web sites and literature that she and others she had gone to considered the best place to start. So here I was, yawning, stretching, and rubbing my eyes in December 2010.  Kyna confessed to knowing little or nothing about transgender issues, but she gave me a start with LGBT web sites and literature that she considered the best place to start.

21 The Education of a Transgender Rip Van Winkle
In December 2010 I met my first LGBT-friendly psychologist, Iulia Molnar at ACCEPT, discovered GLIFAA, and began corresponding with Chloe Schwenke. "I think it's time you finally gave Robyn permission to live her life."  Next it was Martha Harris at the Banyan Counseling Center, with whom I’ve been working ever since. In December 2010 I met my first LGBT-friendly psychologist, Iulia Molnar at ACCEPT, discovered GLIFAA, and began corresponding with Chloe Schwenke. Next it was Martha Harris at the Banyan Counseling Center, with whom I’ve been working ever since. "I think it's time you finally gave Robyn permission to live her life."  Those words were what were ringing through my head as I watched the Bucharest fireworks on New Year’s Eve.

22 Fortochcka In Russian, the fortochka is a small window inside a much larger one that is opened with the first thaws that bring a still not realized promise of spring.  I was now opening the fortochka that I had kept closed most of my conscious life. In Russian, the fortochka is a small window inside a much larger one that is opened with the first thaws that bring a still not realized promise of spring.  I was now opening the fortochka that I had kept closed most of my conscious life. Opening the fortochka meant I would need to start talking with people in my life who might not be accepting.  With memories of 1990 all too vividly replaying in my head, I was scared. Opening the fortochka meant I would need to start talking with people in my life who might not be accepting.  With memories of 1990 all too vividly replaying in my head, I was scared.

23 Fortochcka First stop was the Regional Security Office (RSO). Only much later did I find out that through my honesty, I had just added another person to the list of those who would quietly support me on the road to a new life. Me to RSO: “With my divorce now final, I'm moving ahead to explore an area of my life I never could before.  I'm slowly coming out as the T in LGBT.” RSO to Me: “Gee, Bob, that's another one of your fancy NASA acronyms again, isn't it?  Could you spell it out?” First stop was the Regional Security Office (RSO). Me to RSO: “With my divorce now final, I'm moving ahead to explore an area of my life I never could before.  I'm slowly coming out as the T in LGBT.” RSO to Me: “Gee, Bob, that's another one of your fancy NASA acronyms again, isn't it?  Could you spell it out?” It was the first time I had ever sat down with someone I knew only slightly and declared, "I am transgender, and I don't care who knows.  It is not a secret.“ Only much later did I find out that through my honesty, I had just added another person to the list of those who would quietly support me on the road to a new life. It was also about at this time that I realized there was an added benefit to working in an IT position. Just as when I was at CSC, no one expected me to be in a suit and tie. In fact, IT people are almost expected to look a bit unusual. As my hair started to grow, no one paid the slightest attention. It was the first time I had ever sat down with someone I knew only slightly and declared, "I am transgender, and I don't care who knows.  It is not a secret."

24 Fortochcka And there were many more steps and stops along the way, some happy and fun, some downright scary, all emotional -- Attended the First Romanian Transgender Congress in March 2011, writing a cable afterwards. Slowly came out to my sisters and my son. Slowly came out to select coworkers. In March 2011, began the classic double life. Survived pressure to curtail initiated by a non-accepting colleague. And there were many more steps and stops along the way, some happy and fun, some downright scary, all emotional – Slowly came out to select coworkers. In March 2011, began the classic double life. Attended the First Romanian Transgender Congress in March 2011, writing a cable afterwards. Survived pressure from a non-accepting co-worker to curtail. With GLIFAA colleagues, wrote a white paper on GENDER IDENTITY and EXPRESSION in the FOREIGN SERVICE CONTEXT. Slowly came out to my sisters and my son. This time no one thought I was out of my mind. With GLIFAA colleagues, wrote a white paper on GENDER IDENTITY and EXPRESSION in the FOREIGN SERVICE CONTEXT. This time no one thought I was out of my mind.

25 It had never been done before!
With the support of family, friends, counselors, and a core group of coworkers, I now knew it was not a dream. The impossible had become possible. The only question was, how in the dickens were we going to handle the mechanics and the details of a gender transition in an overseas Embassy environment? In June I began hormone replacement therapy and aggressive facial electrolysis. It had never been done before! With the support of family, friends, counselors, and a core group of coworkers, I now knew it was not a dream. The impossible had become possible. In June I began hormone replacement therapy and aggressive facial electrolysis. The only question was, how in the dickens were we going to handle the mechanics and the details of a gender transition in an overseas Embassy environment? It had never been done before!

26 We formed a committee! INTRODUCED NOT LONG AGO AT AN EMBASSY NEAR YOU:
But as experienced FSOs, we knew how to start. We formed a committee! INTRODUCED NOT LONG AGO AT AN EMBASSY NEAR YOU: But as experienced FSOs, we knew how to start. We formed a committee! INTRODUCED NOT LONG AGO AT AN EMBASSY NEAR YOU:

27 The Gender Transition Committee
Chaired by DCM Duane Butcher and Human Resources Officer Natalie Koza, the GTC included the Management Counselor, the EEO officer, and representatives from MED, RSO, and PA. We based ourselves initially on the experience of NASA, USAID, and guidelines from the Human Resources Campaign. To this we added the Guidance Regarding the Employment of Transgender Individuals in the Federal Workplace published by the Officer of Personnel Management (OPM) in May 2011. Chaired by DCM Duane Butcher and Human Resources Officer Natalie Koza, the GTC included the Management Counselor, the EEO officer, and representatives from MED, RSO, and PA. If time permits, mention Duane’s prior knowledge of me in Tashkent. We based ourselves initially on the experience of NASA, USAID, and guidelines from the Human Resources Campaign. To this we added the Guidance Regarding the Employment of Transgender Individuals in the Federal Workplace published by the Officer of Personnel Management (OPM) in May 2011. Mention Anne Vonhof, the author of the guidance.

28 The Gender Transition Committee
The GTC’s guiding principle came from DCM Butcher at the first meeting -- Gender transition at an overseas post "should be treated no differently than any other significant life event like a birth or a wedding.” The GTC’s guiding principle came from DCM Butcher at the first meeting – Gender transition at an overseas post "should be treated no differently than any other significant life event like a birth or a wedding.”

29 The Gender Transition Committee
Over the summer of 2011 the GTC met repeatedly to make and refine plans, at each stage communicating the decisions to Department HR. But it almost didn’t happen. November 10 was set as the big day for my announcement to the Embassy community, first at a staff meeting and then by personal letter to all staff in both English and Romanian. Over the summer of 2011 the GTC met repeatedly to make and refine plans, at each stage communicating the decisions to Department HR. November 10 was set as the big day for my announcement to the Embassy community, first at a staff meeting and then by personal letter to all staff in both English and Romanian. But it almost didn’t happen.

30 November 9 The Romania desk and EUR/CE had suddenly woken up to the reality of an impending gender transition in Bucharest. They asked for delay, nervous about press interest and the reaction of the Romanian Government. Duane pushed back, keeping the GTC at the Embassy into the evening to write press guidance and prepare input for Informational Memoranda to the 7th floor. The Romania desk and EUR/CE had suddenly woken up to the reality of an impending gender transition in Bucharest. They asked for delay, nervous about press interest and the reaction of the Romanian Government. Duane pushed back, keeping the GTC at the Embassy into the evening to write press guidance and prepare input for Informational Memoranda to the 7th floor. The DCM’s phone kept ringing late into the evening. I went home to a sleepless night, not knowing what the next day would bring. The DCM’s phone kept ringing late into the evening. I went home to a sleepless night, not knowing what the next day would bring.

31 YES November 10 The biggest day of my life had begun.
I learned of the Department’s response only at 8am on the morning of the 10th in a one-word from DCM Butcher: YES The biggest day of my life had begun. I learned the Department’s response at 8am on morning of 10th in a 1-word from DCM Butcher: YES. The biggest day in my life had begun. Talk about staff meeting if time permits. Mention that Romanian translation of my announcment letter was done by Irina Nita at ACCEPT.

32 Two days later I danced and celebrated the night away at the Marine Ball, no longer an artificial construct mirroring what others expected to see. I was living as myself for the first time in my life.

33 I feel more normal and happier than I have in all my life.
But most importantly, None of the fears expressed on November 9 came to pass. I feel more normal and happier than I have in all my life. Both the American and LE Staff in Bucharest have been accepting and supportive beyond my wildest dreams. The Government of Romania issued a new diplomatic ID without hesitation. None of the fears expressed on November 9 came to pass. IF TIME PERMITS: Mention Dilema Veche article. Both the American and LE Staff in Bucharest have been accepting and supportive beyond my wildest dreams. The Government of Romania issued a new diplomatic ID without hesitation. (Mention that POL Counselor delivered msg personally to MFA.) But most importantly, I feel more normal and happier than I have in all my life.

34 Have we got an SOP for you!
And so, if you or someone you know wishes to transition while posted overseas -- Have we got an SOP for you! And so, if you or someone you know wishes to transition while posted overseas – Have we got an SOP for you!

35 Life is too short to do otherwise.
May we all live in self-acceptance and peace no matter what our sexual orientation or gender identity. Life is too short to do otherwise.

36 With thanks to Kyna and the Bucharest GTC.
Dedicated with thanks to Kyna and the Bucharest GTC.

37 Dedicated to Nadine Chilianu and the transgender communities of Romania and Moldova who continue to fight courageously for their human rights. Dedicated to Nadine Chilianu and the transgender communities of Romania and Moldova who continue to fight courageously for their human rights.

38 Рахмат Multumesc With thanks, Robyn Falemenderit Obrigada Спасибо


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