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1 Copyright 2006. Revised 2011. All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. www.ahaprocess.com Applying Bridges out of Poverty Concepts to HPOG Program Instruction.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Copyright 2006. Revised 2011. All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. www.ahaprocess.com Applying Bridges out of Poverty Concepts to HPOG Program Instruction."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Applying Bridges out of Poverty Concepts to HPOG Program Instruction Presented by Jolene Hake Project HELP Central Community College Columbus NE April 23, 2014

2 2 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Guiding Principle The mission of aha! Process, Inc. is to positively impact the education and lives of individuals in poverty around the world.

3 3 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Why study poverty now? The world of higher education and career training has changed. Todays students are often non-traditional, bringing in widely different sets of experiences and backgrounds that affect their opportunity and ability to succeed. Instructors, advisors and trainers have been challenged to create a new understanding to engage students and encourage success.

4 4 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Poverty also affects our communities: From the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University: There is a % chance of developmental delays when children experience 6-7 risk factors. Significant adversity impairs development in the first three years of life – and the more adversity a child faces, the greater the odds of a developmental delay. In fact, risk factors such as poverty, caregiver mental illness, child maltreatment, single parent, and low maternal education have a cumulative impact. 3:1 are the odds of adult heart disease after 7-8 adverse childhood experiences. Early experiences actually get into the body, with lifelong effectsnot just on cognitive and emotional development, but on long term physical health as well.

5 5 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. What does poverty look like to you?

6 6 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. There was only so much trouble we could get into in those early days. Cavalier Manor was a neighborhood filled with surrogate parents, people who would punish you like your momma and daddy if they caught you doing wrong…School was part of the surrogate system…Some of the parents even took it upon themselves to patrol the neighborhood on school days to make sure we were where we were supposed to be. We kids hated that surrogate system…It was only years later, when black communities as we knew them started falling apart, that I came to understand the system for the hidden blessings it contained: It had build-in mechanisms for reinforcing values and trying to prevent us from becoming the hellions some of us turned out to be. --Nathan McCall, Makes Me Wanna Holler

7 7 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Objectives Give examples of hidden rules among classes. Analyze the eleven resources of a student or employee. Explain how economic realities affect patterns of living. Explain language registers, discourse patterns, and story structure. Explain how mental models are effective interventions for cognitive and language barriers. Identify principles for improving outcomes with individuals from generational poverty. Discuss strategies to improve student retention in community colleges and training programs. Analyze the resources of a college student and helpful strategies.

8 8 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Cascade Engineering W2C Retention Rates

9 9 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Mental Models Are internal pictures of how the world works Exist below awareness Are theories-in-use, often unexamined Determine how we act Can help or interfere with learning For a dialogue to occur, we must suspend our mental models. Source: The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook, (1994), by Peter Senge.

10 10 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. No significant learning occurs without a significant relationship. –Dr. James Comer

11 11 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. 1. Think of an adult in generational poverty. 2. Imagine that you followed that person for a year, observing what happened and how he/she spent his/her time. 3. Write your observations in the circle so that the circle represents an average week in the life of this person. Learning Task

12 12 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Mental Model for Poverty What Its Like Now Developed by Phil DeVol (2006)

13 13 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Social Services Religious Organizations SchoolsPolice Businesses Fast food Check cashing Temp services Used car lots Dollar store Pawn shop Liquor store Corner store Rent-to-own Laundromat

14 14 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Housing Trends Statistics for extremely low-income (ELI) renter households before the current economic crisis (since 2007): 70% spent more than half of their income on rent. There was a shortage of 2.8 million affordable units. Only 38 units were affordable and available for every 100 households. Source: Out of Reach 2009, National Low Income Housing Coalition, Keith E. Wardrip, senior research analyst; Danilo Pelletiere, research director; Sheila Crowley, president.

15 15 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. If you did everything your caseworker told you to dogot a job and kept it for a year, never missing a day of workhow much closer (if at all) would you be to being out of poverty at the end of that year than you were at the beginning? The Wage Question

16 16 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Co-Investigating Health Issues The SES (socioeconomic status) gradient. The richer you are, the healthier you are. The poorer you are, the sicker you are. Living in poverty is a risk factor for stress- related illnesses. It is NOT entirely due to lack of access. Source: Why Zebras Dont Get Ulcers, (1998), by Robert Sapolsky.

17 17 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Its Due to Social Coherence Does a person have a sense of being linked to the mainstream of society, of being in the dominant subculture, of being in accord with societys values? Can a person perceive societys messages as information, rather than as noise? In this regard, the poor education that typically accompanies poverty biases toward the latter. Does a person have the resources to carry out plans? Does a person get meaningful feedback from society do their messages make a difference? – Robert Sapolsky, Aaron Antonovsky

18 18 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Tyranny of the Moment The need to act overwhelms any willingness people have to learn. Source: The Art of the Long View by Peter Schwartz. The healthier you are psychologically, or the less you may seem to need to change, the more you can change. Source: Management of the Absurd, (1996), by Richard Farson.

19 19 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Mental Model of Middle Class Middle Class Is an Achievement-Based World Developed by Phil DeVol (2006)

20 20 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Church SchoolsPolice Social Services Businesses Shopping/strip malls Bookstores Banks Fitness centers Veterinary clinics Office complexes Coffee shops Restaurants/bars Golf courses

21 21 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Mental Model for Wealth Developed by Ruby Payne (2005)

22 22 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Mental Model of Generational Poverty It is a description of the concrete experience. It is an abstract representation of poverty. It shows part to whole. It depicts the relative importance and interlocking nature of the elements. It is a depiction of the trap: no future story, no choice, no power.

23 23 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. SUGGESTED READING Freire, Paulo. (1999). Pedagogy of the Oppressed. New York, NY: The Continuum Publishing. Sapolsky, Robert M. (1998). Why Zebras Dont Get Ulcers: An Updated Guide to Stress, Stress-Related Diseases, and Coping. New York, NY: W.H. Freeman & Company. Senge, Peter M. (1990). The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization. New York, NY: Currency/Doubleday. Shipler, David K. (2004). The Working Poor: Invisible in America. New York, NY: Alfred A. Knopf. Wray, Matt, & Newitz, Annalee. (Eds.). (1997). White Trash: Race and Class in America. New York, NY: Routledge.

24 24 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Create a list of what you think the causes of poverty are in the United States. Choose one or two causes from your list and share them with the group. Learning Task

25 25 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Research Continuum Behaviors of the Individual Absence of Human and Social Capital Within the Community Human Exploitation Political/Economic Structures

26 26 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Dependency Single parenthood Bad behavior of individuals and groups Values/work ethic Breakup of families Addiction, mental illness Language experience Discrimination Behaviors of the Individual Research Topics

27 27 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Behaviors of the Individual Assumptions By studying the poor we will learn what changes need to be made. The poor are somehow lacking, either by choice or circumstance. Poverty is a sustainable condition; it will always be with us. Dont blame the system; change the individual.

28 28 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Behaviors of the Individual Strategies Work first Hold individuals accountable for choices Promote marriage Treatment interventions Abstinence education Literacy Enhance language experience Comprehensive sex education

29 29 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Human and Social Capital Research Topics Lack of employment Lack of education Inadequate skill sets Declining neighborhoods Middle class flight Lack of career ladder between service and knowledge sectors Discrimination

30 30 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Human and Social Capital Within the Community Assumptions By studying human and social capital we will learn how to work within the community to create acceptable conditions for those at the bottom. Do not blame the political/economic system; enhance state and local resources.

31 31 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Human and Social Capital Strategies Improve education Enhance skills Full employment, growth in labor market Anti-poverty programs Policing communities Head Start Neighborhood associations Hold social systems accountable

32 32 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Human Exploitation Research Topics Exploitation of dominated groups for profit Exploitation of dominated groups for markets Exploitation of regions for resources and raw materials

33 33 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Human Exploitation Assumptions In America the belief is that if one works hard, he/she can overcome all existing exploitations. The dominant culture is reluctant to legitimize this category and to acknowledge existing exploitationsand is often resistant to new strategies.

34 34 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Human Exploitation Strategies Educate ourselves about current exploitations Recognize our involvement in exploitation Make the system fair

35 35 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Political/Economic Structures Research Topics Deindustrialization The race to the bottom Globalization Increased productivity Shrinking middle class Economic disparity Corporate influence on legislators Discrimination

36 36 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Political/Economic Structures Assumptions Studying the poor is not the same thing as studying poverty; political/economic structures contribute to poverty. The middle class and people in poverty have the right to influence structures in their own interests just as other classes have done. Dont blame only the individual; change the political/economic structure.

37 37 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Political/Economic Structures Strategies Do whole-system planningSocial Health Index (SHI) Use measures of accountability beyond shareholder profit Create intellectual capital Create economic stability for all Create sustainable economy Wealth creating mechanisms that develop a middle class

38 38 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Breakdown of U.S. Households, by Total Money Income: 2009 Income # of U.S. Households (in millions) % of All U.S. Households <$10k8, % $10k–$14.9k6, % $15k–$24.9k14, % $25k–$34.9k13, % $35k–$49.9k16, % $50k–$74.9k21, % $75k–$99.9k13, % $100k–$149.9k14, % $150k–$199.9k 5, % $200k + 4, % Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, 2010 Annual Social and Economic Supplement. Estimated median household income: $50,221 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey.

39 39 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Research Continuum Conclusions There is valid research in all four areas. There are many causes of poverty, so we need a wide array of strategies. Ruby Paynes Framework offers a way to understand complex economic issues and to do a critical analysis of poverty and prosperity.

40 40 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. SUGGESTED READING OConnor, Alice. (2001). Poverty Knowledge: Social Science, Social Policy, and the Poor in Twentieth-Century U.S. History. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Phillips, Kevin. (2002). Wealth and Democracy: A Political History of the American Rich. New York, NY: Broadway Books.

41 41 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Key Point #1 This workshop focuses on economic environments.

42 42 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc.

43 43 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Key Point #2 Economic class is relative.

44 44 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc CENSUS MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME $50,221 STATISTICALLY RICH $100,000 or more

45 45 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Key Point #3 Economic class is a continuous line, not a clear-cut distinction.

46 46 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. United States Official Poverty Guidelines: 2009–2010* Family Size Annual Income Four$ 22,050 Three$ 18,310 Two$ 14,570 One$ 10,830 Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (January 2010). *The procedure for updating the 2010 guidelines was modified to take into account the Consumer Price Index (CPI-U) for the period for which their publication was delayed. As a result, the poverty guideline figures for the remainder of 2010shown abovewere the same as the 2009 poverty guideline figures.

47 47 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Key Point #4 Generational poverty and situational poverty are different.

48 48 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Key Point #5 This work is based on patterns within the environments of economic class. All patterns have exceptions.

49 49 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Key Point #6 An individual brings with him/her the hidden rules of the class in which he/she was raised.

50 50 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Key Point #7 Schools and businesses operate from middle class norms and use the hidden rules of middle class.

51 51 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Key Point #8 In order to build relationships of mutual respect between economic classes, we need to be aware of more than one set of hidden rules.

52 52 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Key Point #9 The more we understand how class affects us and are open to hear how it affects others, the more effective we can be.

53 53 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Key Point #10 In order to achieve, one may have to give up relationships (at least for a time).

54 54 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Bridges Construct #1 Use the lens of economic class to understand and take responsibility for your own societal experience while being open to the experiences of others.

55 55 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Societal System Copyright J. Pfarr Consulting. Reproduced with permission.

56 56 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Define poverty as the extent to which a person, institution, or community does without resources. Bridges Construct #3

57 57 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Bridges Construct #4 Build relationships of mutual respect.

58 58 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Bridges Construct #5 Base plans on the premise that people in all classes, sectors, and political persuasions are problem solvers and need to be at the decision making table.

59 59 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Bridges Construct #6 Base plans on accurate mental models of poverty, middle class, and wealth.

60 60 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Bridges Construct #7 At the individual, institutional, and community/policy levels: Stabilize the environment, remove barriers to transition, and build resources.

61 61 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Bridges Construct #8 Address all causes of poverty (four areas of research).

62 62 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Bridges Construct #9 Build long-term support for individual, institutional, and community/policy transition.

63 63 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Bridges Construct #10 Build economically sustainable communities in which everyone can live well.

64 64 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. SUGGESTED READING for information about aha! Process, Inc. OConnor, Alice. (2001). Poverty Knowledge: Social Science, Social Policy, and the Poor in Twentieth-Century U.S. History. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

65 65 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Talk with one another about the groups you belong to that have hidden rules. Give an example of one hidden rule. Learning Task

66 66 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. POSSESSIONS POVERTY People MIDDLE CLASS Things WEALTH One-of-a-kind objects, legacies, pedigrees

67 67 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. TIME POVERTY Present most important Decisions made for the moment based on feelings or survival MIDDLE CLASS Future most important Decisions made against future ramifications WEALTH Traditions and history most important Decisions made partially based on tradition/decorum

68 68 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. TOOL Future orientation, choice, and power

69 69 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. TOOL If you choose, then youve chosen.

70 70 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. MONEY POVERTY To be used, spent MIDDLE CLASS To be managed WEALTH To be conserved, invested

71 71 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. LOVE POVERTY Love and acceptance conditional, based on whether the individual is liked MIDDLE CLASS Love and acceptance conditional and based largely on achievement WEALTH Love and acceptance conditional and related to social standing and connections

72 72 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. SOCIAL EMPHASIS POVERTY Social inclusion of people he/she likes MIDDLE CLASS Emphasis is on self-governance and self-sufficiency WEALTH Emphasis is on social exclusion

73 73 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. PERSONALITY POVERTY Is for entertainment Sense of humor is highly valued MIDDLE CLASS Is for acquisition and stability Achievement is highly valued WEALTH Is for connections Financial, political, and social connections are highly valued

74 74 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. FOOD POVERTY Key question: Did you have enough? Quantity important MIDDLE CLASS Key question: Did you like it? Quality important WEALTH Key question: Was it presented well? Presentation important

75 75 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. CLOTHING POVERTY Clothing valued for individual style and expression of personality MIDDLE CLASS Clothing valued for its quality and acceptance into norm of middle class Label important WEALTH Clothing valued for its artistic sense and expression Designer important

76 76 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. DESTINY POVERTY Believes in fate Cannot do much to mitigate chance MIDDLE CLASS Believes in choice Can change future with good choices now WEALTH Noblesse oblige

77 77 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. EDUCATION POVERTY Valued and revered as abstract but not as reality MIDDLE CLASS Crucial for climbing success ladder and making money WEALTH Necessary tradition for making and maintaining connections

78 78 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. WORLDVIEW POVERTY Sees world in terms of local setting MIDDLE CLASS Sees world in terms of national setting WEALTH Sees world in terms of international view

79 79 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. HUMOR POVERTY About people About situations MIDDLE CLASS WEALTH About social faux pas

80 80 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. FAMILY STRUCTURE POVERTY Tends to be matriarchal MIDDLE CLASS Tends to be patriarchal WEALTH Depends on who has the money

81 81 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. LANGUAGE POVERTY Casual register Language is about survival MIDDLE CLASS Formal register Language is about negotiation WEALTH Formal register Language is about networking

82 82 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. POWER POVERTY Power linked to personal respect Ability to fight Cant stop bad things from happening MIDDLE CLASS Power/respect separated Responds to position Power in information and institutions WEALTH Power in expertise, connections Power in stability Influences policy and direction

83 83 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. DRIVING FORCES POVERTY Survival, relationships, entertainment MIDDLE CLASS Work, achievement, material security WEALTH Financial, political, social connections

84 84 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Learning Task In groups of two or three, review two of the hidden rules. Describe the understandable reasons for those rules. Discuss how those hidden rules play out between/among individuals in poverty and middle class. Explore how staff can use this information to make relationships more meaningful. What can be done to improve outcomes?

85 85 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. What Can You Do in the Work and Agency Setting? Individual Lens Hidden Rules Direct-teach the hidden rules. Teach that there are three sets of rules. Understand the hidden rules of your work/agency setting. Understand the hidden rules that customers and employees bring with them.

86 86 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. SUGGESTED READING Fussell, Paul. (1983). Class: A Guide Through the American Status System. New York, NY: Touchstone. hooks, bell. (2000). Where We Stand: Class Matters. New York, NY: Routledge. Kadi, Joanna. (1966). Thinking Class: Sketches from a Cultural Worker. Boston, MA: South End Press. Komarovsky, Mirra. (1967). Blue-Collar Marriage. New York, NY: Vintage Books.

87 87 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. REGISTERS OF LANGUAGE REGISTEREXPLANATION FROZEN Language that is always the same. For example: Lords Prayer, wedding vows, etc. FORMAL The standard sentence syntax and word choice of work and school. Has complete sentences and specific word choice. CONSULTATIVE Formal register when used in conversation. Discourse pattern not quite as direct as formal register. CASUAL Language between friends and is characterized by a 400- to 800-word vocabulary. Word choice general and not specific. Conversation dependent upon nonverbal assists. Sentence syntax often incomplete. INTIMATE Language between lovers or twins. Language of sexual harassment. Adapted from the work of Martin Joos

88 88 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Research About Language in Children, Ages 1 to 4, in Stable Households by Economic Group Research About Language in Children, Ages 1 to 4, in Stable Households by Economic Group Number of Words Exposed to Economic Group Affirmation s (Strokes) Prohibitions (Discounts) 13 million words Welfare1 for every2 26 million words Working class 2 for every1 45 million words Profession al 6 for every1 Source: Meaningful Differences in the Everyday Experience of Young American Children, (1995), by Betty Hart and Todd R. Risley.

89 89 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. REGISTERS OF LANGUAGE FROZEN FORMAL CONSULTATIVE CASUAL INTIMATE

90 90 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Casual Register (the language of close friends) Formal Register (the language of school and business) Wazzup? How are you doing? My bad. It was my fault; please excuse me. I accept responsibility for my grievous error. I apologize for my faux pas. … Groan … I made a mistake. I feel uncomfortable. I do not wish to comply with your request. Would you consider an alternative?

91 91 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Casual Register (the language of close friends) Formal Register (the language of school and business) Wuzzat chew say? Could you repeat that, please? Hook me up. Would you be so kind as to introduce me to … I would really appreciate your assistance. Thats tight. Thats cool. Thats da bomb. This activity overwhelmed me with its outstanding value and significance to my future. This is an excellent suggestion. I would like to compliment you on your choice of …

92 92 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. PATTERNS OF DISCOURSE FORMAL CASUAL

93 93 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. If an individual depends upon a random, episodic story structure for memory patterns, lives in an unpredictable environment, and has not developed the ability to plan, THEN … If an individual cannot plan, he/she cannot predict. If an individual cannot predict, then he/she cannot identify cause and effect. If an individual cannot identify cause and effect, he/she cannot identify consequence. If an individual cannot identify consequence, he/she cannot control impulsivity. If an individual cannot control impulsivity, he/she has an inclination toward criminal behavior.

94 94 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Societal System Copyright J. Pfarr Consulting. Reproduced with permission.

95 95 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Describe two ways you can enhance positive self-talk with your students, co- workers, and clients. Learning Task

96 96 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Using a recent experience with a customer or co- worker, describe the use of language registers, discourse pattern, and story structure. At your table, discuss what changes need to be made to improve relationships and outcomes with customers and co-workers. Learning Task

97 97 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. What Can You Do in the Work and Agency Setting? Individual Lens Language, Story Structure, and Cognition 1.Teach formal register to employees and customers so they can have access to even more community settings. 2.Encourage front-line staff to understand casual register. Staff must be able to translate forms and instructions from formal to casual register. Staff must be aware of nonverbal communication. 3.Rewrite forms to be more meaningful. 4.Reduce middle class noise by using meaningful mental models, drawings, stories, and analogies. 5.Work with community partners to promote a rich language experience for children from birth to 5 years of age. 6.Reframe into learning experiences conflicts that have resulted from the use of casual register. 7.Use the Tucker Signing Strategies to teach reading skills.

98 98 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. SUGGESTED READING Hart, Betty, & Risley, Todd R. (1995). Meaningful Differences in the Everyday Experience of Young American Children. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes. Lareau, Annette. (2003). Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. Levine, Mel. (2002). A Mind at a Time. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster. Sharron, Howard, & Coulter, Martha. (2004). Changing Childrens Minds: Feuersteins Revolution in the Teaching of Intelligence. Highlands, TX: aha! Process.

99 99 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc.

100 100 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Family Structure

101 101 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. 1. Multiple Relationships 3. Favoritism 4. Male Identity 2. Changing Allegiances

102 102 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. DESTINY POVERTY Believes in fate Cannot do much to mitigate chance MIDDLE CLASS Believes in choice Can change future with good choices now WEALTH Noblesse oblige

103 103 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. believes that one is fated or destined the behavior not get caught deny punished forgiven

104 104 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. SUGGESTED READING Komarovsky, Mirra. (1967). Blue-Collar Marriage. New York, NY: Vintage Books. Lareau, Annette. (2003). Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. Levine, Mel. (2002). A Mind at a Time. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster. Rusk, David. (1999). Inside Game, Outside Game: Winning Strategies for Saving Urban America. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press.

105 105 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. DEFINITION OF RESOURCES To better understand people from poverty, the definition of poverty will be the extent to which an individual does without resources. The resources are the following …

106 106 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. DEFINITION OF RESOURCES FINANCIAL Being able to purchase the goods and services of that class and sustain it. EMOTIONAL Being able to choose and control emotional responses, particularly to negative situations, without engaging in self-destructive behavior. Shows itself through choices. MENTAL Having the mental abilities and acquired skills (reading, writing, computing) to deal with daily life. SPIRITUAL Believing in (divine) purpose and guidance. PHYSICAL Having physical health and mobility. SUPPORT SYSTEMS Having friends, family, and backup resources available to access in times of need. These are external resources. RELATIONSHIPS/ROLE MODELS Having frequent access to adult(s) who are appropriate, nurturing, and who do not engage in destructive behavior. KNOWLEDGE OF HIDDEN RULES Knowing the unspoken cues and habits of a group.

107 107 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. DEFINITION OF RESOURCES Connections, social networks, and norms of reciprocity and trustworthiness Private and public aspects – Bonding – Bridging – Thick and thin Source: Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community, (2000), by Robert D. Putnam.

108 108 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Processing Information about Resources What resources might the person want to build? What support can your agency or college provide? What supports might your community provide? What policy changes might be needed?

109 109 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. MENTAL MODEL OF SOCIAL CAPITAL MENTAL MODEL OF SOCIAL CAPITAL

110 110 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. RESOURCES ADDED TO GETTING AHEAD RESOURCES ADDED TO GETTING AHEAD Integrity and trust: Your word is good, you do what you say you will do, and you are safe. Motivation and persistence: You have the energy and drive to prepare for, plan, and complete projects, jobs, and personal changes. Formal register: You have the emotional control, vocabulary, language ability, and negotiation skills to succeed in school and/or work settings.

111 111 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Questions to Ask About Resources EMOTIONAL Is there evidence that the individual has persistence? Does the individual have the words to express feelings in a way others can receive? Does the individual have coping strategies (for adverse situations) that are not destructive to self or others?

112 112 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Questions to Ask About Resources MENTAL Can the individual read, write, and compute? Can the individual plan? Can the individual problem-solve? Can the individual understand cause and effect, then identify consequence?

113 113 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Questions to Ask About Resources SPIRITUAL Does the individual believe in divine guidance and assistance? Does the individual have belief in something larger than self? Does the individual perceive an abstract and larger perspective that provides depth and meaning to life (culture, science, higher power, etc.)?

114 114 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Questions to Ask About Resources PHYSICAL Can the individual take care of him-/herself without help? Does the physical body allow the person to work and to learn? Does the individual have transportation resources to get from one place to another? Does the individual have health and wellness?

115 115 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Questions to Ask About Resources SUPPORT SYSTEMS AND SOCIAL CAPITAL Who is the individuals bonding social capital? Is it positive? Who is the individuals bridging social capital? Is it positive?

116 116 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Questions to Ask About Resources KNOWLEDGE OF MIDDLE CLASS HIDDEN RULES Does this individual know the hidden rules of school and work? How important are achievement and work? Will this individual give up relationships, at least for a period of time, for achievement?

117 117 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. RESOURCES WORKSHEET ResourcesRating Comments Concerns/Issues Planning/Treatment Financial Emotional Coping Strategies Resiliency Mental Spiritual Physical Support Systems Role Models Knowledge of Hidden Rules Rating Scale ? 5 = highest rating ? = not enough information

118 118 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. RESILIENCY RESEARCH InsightTough questions, honest answers: why IndependenceKeeping distance emotionally and physically RelationshipsTies to people of mutual respect InitiativeTaking charge of problems, stretching themselves CreativityImposing order, beauty, purpose HumorFinding the comic in the tragic MoralityStaying holy in an unholy place Adapted from The Resilient Self: How Survivors of Troubled Families Rise Above Adversity, (1993), Wolin, Steven, and Wolin, Sybil.

119 119 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Cascade Engineering W2C Retention Rates

120 120 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Cascade Engineering Key Features Privately owned by Fred Keller W2C employees: 77 women, 22 men Non-W2C: 211 women, 430 men Cost of losing employees in first 60 days: $2,500 to $3,000 False starts: van, Burger King Training: Ruby Paynes Framework and public partnerships Source: Welfare-to-Career at Cascade Engineering, Inc., (2002), by James Bradley.

121 121 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc.

122 122 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Share with two or three others one program design change that you think needs to be made. Learning Task

123 123 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. What Can You Do in the Work and Agency Setting? Resources 1.Examine the eight resources for individuals from poverty to become more aware of internal strengths and environmental assets of customers and employees. 2.Build interventions on strengths and resiliency. Look for the part of the glass that is half full. 3.Engage people in poverty in solving individual and community problems. 4.Provide economic opportunities for individuals from poverty. 5.Foster the development of resources in the community. 6.Refer individuals to associations according to interests, skills, talents, and gifts. Individual Lens

124 124 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. SUGGESTED READING Fisher, Roger, & Ury, William. (1983). Getting to YES: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In. New York, NY: Penguin Books. Goleman, Daniel. (1995). Emotional Intelligence. New York, NY: Bantam Books. Gurian, Michael. (1996). The Wonder of Boys: What Parents, Mentors and Educators Can Do to Shape Boys into Exceptional Men. New York, NY: Tarcher/Putnam. Huang, Al Chungliang, & Lynch, Jerry. (1995). Mentoring: The Tao of Giving and Receiving Wisdom. San Francisco, CA: HarperOne. Kretzmann, John, & McKnight, John. (1993). Building Communities from the Inside Out: A Path Toward Finding and Mobilizing a Communitys Assets. Chicago, IL: ACTA Publications. Pransky, Jack. (1998). Modello: A Story of Hope for the Inner City and Beyond. Cabot, VT: NEHRI Publications. Putnam, Robert D. (2000). Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster. Stosny, Steven. (2003). The Powerful Self. Silver Spring, MD: Booksurge, LLC. Weisinger, Hendrie. (1998). Emotional Intelligence at Work. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

125 125 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Human relationship is a sledgehammer that obliterates every societal difference. –Robert Sapolsky

126 126 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. The Tale of Two Students A Study of Personal Resources Olivier, separated father of four Goal is Associate Degree in Nursing (RN) Certified as Nursing Assistant Native of the Democratic Republic of the Congo High school teacher who lost all assets when he fled native country for safety in Kenya, later a refugee to United States. Georgette, single mom with two children, one with a health condition Goal is to become Practical or Registered Nurse Certified as Nursing Assistant Grew up in generational poverty Learning Disability On financial and academic suspension for federal aid

127 127 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Resources and Barriers Oliviers Barriers First Language is French, English 4th Language Difficult relationship with wife Potential legal issues Working full time to support family Low social capital but support from children and church Tyranny of the moment Unstable financial position Ineligible for Pell Grants due to 4 year degree Georgettes Barriers Learning Disability Anger issues Partial knowledge of hidden rules of middle class Distrust of middle class institutions Lack of planning skills Tyranny of the moment Childs medical condition Childcare Unstable financial position Lack of social capital

128 128 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Strategies Classroom/Advisor Tips Build relationship of mutual respect with students Learn hidden rules of poverty Encourage Intro to College class Digital recorder to record lectures Discuss whole picture with student when registering for class Use videos often Mediate using the What, Why & How Make information relevant using stories, metaphors, analogies Encourage positive self talk, choices and accountability Have high expectations Study Tips Flashcards Disability (text to speech) software Study Groups Peer Tutoring Provide school supplies, planners and loan out laptops if possible Teach students to take notes and use highlighter for main points Opportunities to learn study, planning and sorting skills Teach goal setting by planning backwards Use of mind maps, mental models and sketching

129 129 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes. –Marcel Proust

130 130 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. If you have come to help me, you can go home again. But if you see my struggles as a part of your own survival, then perhaps we can work together. –Lila Watson, an Aboriginal Woman from Australia

131 131 Copyright Revised All rights reserved. aha! Process, Inc. Additional Informational Resources Understanding and Engaging Under-Resourced College Students Becker, Krodel and Tucker) aha process! Inc. ISBN See Poverty…Be the Difference! Dr. Donna M. Beegle ISBN


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