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Cypress California Stake EmergencyResponsePlan Effective January 2006 Cypress California Stake EmergencyResponsePlan Effective January 2006 Presented by:

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Presentation on theme: "Cypress California Stake EmergencyResponsePlan Effective January 2006 Cypress California Stake EmergencyResponsePlan Effective January 2006 Presented by:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Cypress California Stake EmergencyResponsePlan Effective January 2006 Cypress California Stake EmergencyResponsePlan Effective January 2006 Presented by: Kory Mikesell Cypress, CA Stake Emergency Preparedness Chairman

2 ObjectivesObjectives l Identify who will be involved in the Stakes emergency response plan. l Develop the considerations on which the response will be based. l Practice this plan so in the time of crises we will be PREPARED!

3 l Fire Possible Major Emergencies l Earthquake l Flood l Chemical spill / Terrorist incident l Long term Disruption of Services [Water, Electricity]

4 The Stake Emergency Plan Has Four Major Sections l Mitigation Minimizing the impact of an emergency l Preparation Assembling needed supplies in advance l Reaction An operational plan l Recovery Long term physical, spiritual and emotional support

5 MitigationMitigation l Hazards and probability of impact l Church buildings potentially affected l Locations of special populations l Critical resource needs l Ward / Stake and area maps

6 PreparationPreparation By being prepared we free up resources and personnel to help in time of trouble. We need to: l Teach members self reliance & safety l Provide information and resources for 72 hour kits. l Provide opportunities for CPR / First Aid instruction. l CERT Training (Search and Rescue, Light Fire fighting, Emergency First Aid, Triage)

7 But What Will Be Your Response? l What action should you take… l When… l At whose direction...

8 What kind of needs will there be in a severe emergency or disaster? l Search and rescue l Member status l Medical / First Aid l Care of the elderly l Crisis Response l Distribution of resources l Housing

9 lThe person in charge and their chain of command. lWard and Stake leadership. lTrained Ward members. lVolunteers. We should have an organizational system in place that can incorporate: We should have an organizational system in place that can incorporate:

10 The reality is, that as a Church leader, in a truly disastrous situation you may have ….. l Few or no resources l Hundreds of people in need. l Hundreds of volunteers. l OR ……. The reality is, that as a Church leader, in a truly disastrous situation you may have ….. l Few or no resources l Hundreds of people in need. l Hundreds of volunteers. l OR …….

11 ALL OF THE ABOVE!

12 How will you Handle all of this?

13

14 INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM 101 Information gathered from FEMA & the California Office of Emergency Services Edited and adapted by

15 DEFINITION A nationally used standardized on-scene emergency management system specifically designed to allow its user(s) to adopt an integrated organizational structure. After the Oakland fires, it was recognized that a unified system of communications, command and control was needed. Started by the Forest Service and quickly accepted by other government branches, it had become the platform for all first responding agencies. Incident Command System (ICS) (ICS)

16 ICS Principles This will ensure that Church and Emergency Response personnel are speaking the same language l The same command structure. l Eliminate Mormonisms l Allow us to be an asset to the community rather than a liability.

17 ICS Principles Everyone should: l Know common terminology before an emergency. l Make use of common terminology to refer to the situation. l Work from the same set of achievable objectives.

18 ICS Principles l Emergencies require certain tasks or functions to be performed. l Every incident needs a person in charge. l No one should direct more than 7 others. l No one should report to more than 1 person.

19 Incident Command System l Method for managing emergencies l Most commonly used by: –First-response agencies [Police, Fire] –Emergency medical services [EMS] –Emergency management personnel [FEMA, Red Cross]

20 ICS Interaction Cypress Stake I C S FIREPOLICEEMSFEMA RED CROSS Etc.

21 ObjectivesObjectives 1. Explain how the incident organization expands or contracts to meet operational needs of the incident or event. 2. Describe the use of Branches, Divisions, and Groups within the Operations Section and provide supervisory titles associated with each level. 3. List the essential elements of information involved in transfer of command. 4. Match organizational positions with appropriate ICS sections. 5. List the individuals you may / may not be able to count on. 1. Explain how the incident organization expands or contracts to meet operational needs of the incident or event. 2. Describe the use of Branches, Divisions, and Groups within the Operations Section and provide supervisory titles associated with each level. 3. List the essential elements of information involved in transfer of command. 4. Match organizational positions with appropriate ICS sections. 5. List the individuals you may / may not be able to count on.

22 Five Primary Management Areas Stake Center Addl Location? Orange Ave. Crescent Ave. Unified Command Center Institute of ReligionUnified Command Center Institute of Religion

23 Cypress Stake Cypress Stake Cypress Stakes designated Base of operations will be the Institute of Religion We may need to establish a location North of the 91 or 5 freeways. ?

24 Why use the Institute of Religion as the Stake Command Center? More centrally located More centrally located Apt to be less affected Apt to be less affected Away from chaos Away from chaos Large greenbelts Large greenbelts ?

25 Two Ways to Organize Incident Command Incident Command A A C B Single Command Ward Single Command Ward Unified Command Stake Unified Command Stake

26 Managing an Incident Using Unified Command Managing an Incident Using Unified Command HazardousMaterialsIncidentHazardousMaterialsIncident Unified command AABBCC Objectives and Strategy Incident Action Plan Objectives and Strategy Incident Action Plan Operations Section Chief Operations Div.ADiv.ADiv.BDiv.BDiv.CDiv.C A B C

27 Five Primary ICS Management Functions Operations Operations Planning Planning Logistics Logistics Finance/Administration Finance/ Administration Command Command

28 OperationsOperations PlanningPlanning LogisticsLogistics Finance/AdministrationFinance/Administration CommandCommand Functional Responsibilities FunctionFunctionResponsibilityResponsibility =Overall responsibility =Direct tactical actions =Prepare action plan- maintain resource & situation status =Prepare action plan- maintain resource & situation status =Provide support =Cost accounting & procurements

29 Span of Control Ineffective and possibly dangerous Ineffective and possibly dangerous Effective span of control Effective span of control

30 Supervisor Optimum Span of Control is One to Five Optimum Span of Control is One to Five

31 Planning Section Chief Planning Resources and Situation Unit J. Smith Resources and Situation Unit J. Smith ResourcesUnit ResourcesUnit SituationUnit SituationUnit General Guideline: Do not combine organizational units. One person may supervise more than one unit.

32 Higher Ranking Persons Arriving at an Incident will: Higher Ranking Persons Arriving at an Incident will: l Assume Command l Maintain Command l Reassign Command to a Third Party l Assume Command l Maintain Command l Reassign Command to a Third Party

33 Incident Operations Organization Small Incident Organization Command Single Resource Single Resource Large Incident Organization Large Incident Organization Command Sections Branches Divisions/Groups Resources Multiple layers as needed for span of control Single Resource Single Resource

34 Guidelines in Developing the ICS Organization l Establish the Incident Command Post l Determine organization needs l Consider needs for Command Staff l Monitor and maintain span of control l Demobilize organizational elements when possible l Avoid combining organizational positions l Establish the Incident Command Post l Determine organization needs l Consider needs for Command Staff l Monitor and maintain span of control l Demobilize organizational elements when possible l Avoid combining organizational positions

35 In ICS, common terminology is applied to: In ICS, common terminology is applied to: l Organizational elements l Position titles l Resources l Facilities l Organizational elements l Position titles l Resources l Facilities

36 ICS Terminology is Used For: l Organizational Elements - e.g., Division, Branch, Unit, etc. l Position Titles - e.g., Officer, Director, Leader, etc. l Facilities - e.g., Incident command Post, Staging Area, etc. l Resources - e.g., Task forces, Strike teams, etc. l Organizational Elements - e.g., Division, Branch, Unit, etc. l Position Titles - e.g., Officer, Director, Leader, etc. l Facilities - e.g., Incident command Post, Staging Area, etc. l Resources - e.g., Task forces, Strike teams, etc.

37 Incident Command OperationsPlanningLogistics Finance/ Administration Branch DivisionGroup Single Resources Task Forces Strike Teams Units within Planning Logistics Finance/Administration Units Organization Structure Managerial Level Managerial Level Command Section Chief Section Chief Directors Supervisors Leaders

38 Resource Management in ICS Single Resources Includes personnel and equipment Strike Team Combination of same kind and type Task Forces Combination of single resources

39 Resource Status Conditions in ICS Resource Status Conditions in ICS Available Assigned Out of Service

40 The Use of Task Forces and Strike Teams: The Use of Task Forces and Strike Teams: l Maximizes effective use of resources. l Reduces span of control. l Reduces communications traffic. l Maximizes effective use of resources. l Reduces span of control. l Reduces communications traffic.

41 Unity and Chain of Command Unity of Command - Have a line of supervision Unity of Command - Have a clear line of supervision Chain of Command - Orderly ranking of management positions in line of authority

42 ICS Organization Flexibility Functions will determine the required organization.

43 Incident Commander (Stake President, Bishop, First on Scene) Operations Safety Officer Liaison Officer Information Officer PlanningLogistics Finance/Admin ICS Command Organization

44 Expanded Organization Incident Commander Operations Safety Officer Liaison Officer Public Information Officer PlanningLogisticsFinance/Admin Situation Analysis Documentation Security Search & Rescue Member Care Purchasing Staffing Communications Supplies Housing Medical

45 Information Admin. PublicInformation Safety LogisticsPlanning Command Liaison Functional Responsibilities of the Incident Commander

46 Incident Command System Incident Commander responsibilities: l Assess the situation. l Establish objectives. l Track resource availability. l Develop and monitor the action plan. l Ensure proper documentation. l Appoint additional staff as necessary.

47 A Written Action Plan is Needed When: A Written Action Plan is Needed When: l Two or more jurisdictions are involved. l The incident will overlap an operational period change. l Partial or full activation of the ICS organization. l Two or more jurisdictions are involved. l The incident will overlap an operational period change. l Partial or full activation of the ICS organization.

48 Incident Management by Objectives Achieving the tactical goals

49 Understand Stake policy, plan and direction Establish achievable incident objectives Select an appropriate strategy Perform tactical actions AchieveTheGoalAchieveTheGoal

50 The Command Staff Information Officer Liaison Officer Safety Officer

51 Information Officer l One per incident l Central point for information dissemination to Stake / Area Authorities, Church HQ, media etc. l One per incident l Central point for information dissemination to Stake / Area Authorities, Church HQ, media etc.

52 l One per incident l Anticipate, detect, and correct unsafe situations l Has emergency authority to stop unsafe acts l One per incident l Anticipate, detect, and correct unsafe situations l Has emergency authority to stop unsafe acts Safety Officer

53 Liaison Officer l Contact point for representatives of assisting and cooperating agencies l Assisting agency - provides tactical or service resources (Police, Fire, EMS) l Cooperating agency - provides support other than tactical or service resources, e.g., Red Cross, Bishops Storehouse, other Stakes. Etc.

54 Reasons to Transfer Command l A more qualified person assumes command. l A jurisdictional or agency change in command is legally required or makes good management sense. l Normal turnover of personnel on long or extended incidents. l A more qualified person assumes command. l A jurisdictional or agency change in command is legally required or makes good management sense. l Normal turnover of personnel on long or extended incidents.

55 Search&Rescue Operations MemberCare Security Medical Functional Responsibilities of the Operations Chief Staging

56 Functional Groups Operations Section Chief Operations Section Chief Security Group Security Group Search Group Search Group Medical Group Medical Group

57 Operations Section l Directs and coordinates all incident tactical operations l Organization develops as required l Organization can consist of: l Directs and coordinates all incident tactical operations l Organization develops as required l Organization can consist of: l Single Resources, Task Forces, and Strike teams l Staging Areas l Divisions, Groups, Branches l Single Resources, Task Forces, and Strike teams l Staging Areas l Divisions, Groups, Branches

58 Staging Area l Locations to place available resources l Several staging areas may be used l Manager reports to IC or Operations Section Chief l Resources are available on 3-minute notice l May be relocated l Locations to place available resources l Several staging areas may be used l Manager reports to IC or Operations Section Chief l Resources are available on 3-minute notice l May be relocated

59 Planning Analysis Documentation Functional Responsibilities of Planning Chief Functional Responsibilities of Planning Chief Action Plans Recovery Intelligence

60 Planning Section l Maintain resource status l Maintain situation status l Prepare Incident Action Plan l Provide documentation service l Prepare Demobilization plan l Provide technical specialists l Maintain resource status l Maintain situation status l Prepare Incident Action Plan l Provide documentation service l Prepare Demobilization plan l Provide technical specialists

61 Planning Section... l Resources Unit What items are needed What items are needed l Situation Unit Where we are l Documentation Unit What resources we have in use l Demobilization Unit Normalization and Clean up l Resources Unit What items are needed What items are needed l Situation Unit Where we are l Documentation Unit What resources we have in use l Demobilization Unit Normalization and Clean up may be organized into four positions:

62 Logistics Supplies Transportation Functional Responsibilities of the Logistics Chief Staffing ShelterCommunications

63 Primary Logistics Section Units Primary Logistics Section Units l Communications Unit l Medical Unit l Food Unit Unit l Supply Unit l Facilities Unit l Ground Support Unit l Communications Unit l Medical Unit l Food Unit Unit l Supply Unit l Facilities Unit l Ground Support Unit

64 Logistics Section l Provides services and support to the incident or event l Six principal activities l Two-branch structure if needed l Provides services and support to the incident or event l Six principal activities l Two-branch structure if needed

65 Logistics Branch Structure Logistics Section Service Branch Support Branch l Communications l Medical l Food l Communications l Medical l Food l Supply l Facilities l Ground Support l Supply l Facilities l Ground Support

66 Communications Networks That May be Required Communications Networks That May be Required l Within each Ward l Between buildings l Stake wide l Stake to Stake l Stake to Bishops Storehouse l Stake to Area Authorities l Within each Ward l Between buildings l Stake wide l Stake to Stake l Stake to Bishops Storehouse l Stake to Area Authorities

67 Planning Funding Purchasing Functional Responsibilities of Administration Chief Functional Responsibilities of Administration Chief Action Plans Shelter Costs

68 Administration Section Administration Section $ l Procurement Unit Equipment and supplies l Housing On-sight, temporary, long term relocation l Cost Unit Collect cost information, provide cost estimates l Procurement Unit Equipment and supplies l Housing On-sight, temporary, long term relocation l Cost Unit Collect cost information, provide cost estimates

69 Finance/ Administration Section Finance/ Administration Section $ l Monitors incident costs l Maintains Financial records l Administers procurement contracts l Performs time recording l Monitors incident costs l Maintains Financial records l Administers procurement contracts l Performs time recording

70 What do you have? What do you have? What resources would you need to be self-sufficient for 72 hours? l Tools l Medical supplies l Food / Water l Tarps and blankets

71 What do you need? Where will you get these supplies? l Stockpile in advance? l Member donations? l Procure from local stores? l Bishops Storehouse?

72 In An Emergency, Who Should We Count On? l Stake Presidency l Stake Leadership [High Council, YM/YW Presidencies, Stake Radio Response team, etc.] [High Council, YM/YW Presidencies, Stake Radio Response team, etc.] l Ward Bishoprics l Ward Leadership [Ward Council, and their Presidencies] [Ward Council, and their Presidencies] l Ward Emergency Preparation Specialists

73 Who Should We Count On? Cont. Who else in our Stake / Ward, has special talents / skills that should be included? l Health Care Practitioners l Logistics specialists l Communications specialists l Individuals trained in Emergency Response l Individuals trained in CPR / First Aid l CERT Team members

74 Who you may not be able to count on. Who in our Stake / Ward has special responsibilities that may not be available to you? l Doctors, Nurses l Police Personnel l School Teachers, Aides and Supervisors l Public Safety officers l Anyone who may be more than 10 miles from home at the time of the incident!

75 Activity: ICS Wedding Planning 1. Brainstorm about all the activities that occur around a wedding. 2. Use ICS to make personnel assignments for the activities. 3. Fill out blank ICS structure

76 Each member of the Stake leadership & Ward council should study this plan and thoroughly understand it. You may have to rely on your memory of its details, if in an emergency if you are required to place it into operation!

77 Dates To Remember Dates To Remember March 4 th 4 th – Stake Conference Preparation DisplaysPreparation Displays March 11 th – Table Top Disaster May 20 th – Community Disaster Exercise CSC 9:00 amCSC 9:00 am Full implementation of the Stake planFull implementation of the Stake plan Each Building 9:00 amEach Building 9:00 am

78 Questions ?

79 Closing Remarks &Prayer

80 Thank You for Attending


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