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Influence of Culture on Consumer Behavior CHAPTER ELEVEN.

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Presentation on theme: "Influence of Culture on Consumer Behavior CHAPTER ELEVEN."— Presentation transcript:

1 Influence of Culture on Consumer Behavior CHAPTER ELEVEN

2 Learning Objectives 1.To Understand What Culture Is and How It Impacts Consumer Behaviors. 2.To Understand How Culture Acts as an Invisible Hand That Guides Consumption- Related Attitudes, Values, and Behavior. 3.To Understand How Culture Sets Standards for What Satisfies Consumers Needs. 4.To Understand How Culture Is Learned and Expressed in Language, Symbols, and Rituals. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall2Chapter Eleven Slide

3 Learning Objectives (continued) 5.To Understand How Consumers Are Always Adapting to Culture-Related Experiences. 6.To Understand How the Impact of Culture on Consumer Behavior Is Measured. 7.To Understand How Core Cultural Values Impact American Consumers. 8.To Understand How the American Culture Became a Shopping Culture. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall3Chapter Eleven Slide

4 To Which Cultural Value or Values Is This Products Advertising Appealing? 4Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

5 Convenience in Food Preparation 5Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

6 Culture The sum total of learned beliefs, values, and customs that serve to regulate the consumer behavior of members of a particular society. 6Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

7 A Theoretical Model of Cultures Influence on Behavior - Figure Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

8 The Invisible Hand of Culture Each individual perceives the world through his own cultural lens 88Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

9 Lifestyle Matrix for Global Youth Figure Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

10 Culture Satisfies Needs Food and Clothing Needs vs. Luxury 10 Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

11 In Terms of Culture, Do You Consider This Product to Be a Good Morning Beverage? Why or Why Not? 11Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

12 Many Will Say NO Due to Lack of Nutritional Value and Competing Products (Coffee). 12Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

13 Culture Is Learned Enculturation and acculturation Language and symbols Ritual Sharing of culture Enculturation – The learning of ones own culture Acculturation – The learning of a new or foreign culture Issues 13Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

14 Discussion Questions How do U.S. marketers target consumers who have moved to the U.S. and are new to the U.S. culture? How do U.S. marketers target consumers who live outside the U.S. and are adopting parts of the U.S. culture? 14Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

15 Culture Is Learned Enculturation and acculturation Language and symbols Ritual Sharing of culture Issues Without a common language,shared meaning could not exist Marketers must choose appropriate symbols in advertising Marketers can use known symbols for associations 15Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

16 How Does a Symbol Convey the Products Advertised Benefits? 16Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

17 They Provide Additional Meaning to the Ad. 17Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

18 Culture Is Learned Enculturation and acculturation Language and symbols Ritual Sharing of culture Issues A ritual is a type of symbolic activity consisting of a series of steps Rituals extend over the human life cycle Marketers realize that rituals often involve products (artifacts) 18Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

19 Discussion Questions What are some rituals (religious, educational, social) that you have experienced? What artifacts or products were part of that ritual? How did marketers influence the choice of these artifacts? 19Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

20 Selected Rituals and Associated Artifacts - Table 11.2 SELECTED RITUALSTYPICAL ARTIFACTS WeddingWhite gown (something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue) Birth of childU.S. Savings Bond, silver baby spoon BirthdayCard, present, cake with candles 50th Wedding anniversaryCatered party, card and gift, display of photos of the couples life together GraduationPen, U.S. Savings Bond, card, wristwatch Valentines DayCandy, card, flowers New Years EveChampagne, party, fancy dress 20Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

21 Culture Is Learned Enculturation and acculturation Language and symbols Ritual Sharing of Culture Issues To be a cultural characteristic, a belief, value, or practice must be shared by a significant portion of the society Culture is transferred through family, schools, houses of worship, and media 21Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

22 Facial Beauty Ritual of a Young TV Advertising Sales Representative - Table I pull my hair back with a headband. 2. I take all of my makeup off with LOreal eye makeup remover. 3. Next, I use a Q-tip with some moisturizer around my eyes to make sure all eye makeup is removed. 4. I wash my face with Noxzema facial wash. 5.I apply Clinique Dramatically Different Lotion to my face, neck, and throat. 6.If I have a blemish, I apply Clearasil Treatment to the area to dry it out. 6. Twice weekly (or as necessary) I use Aapri Facial Scrub to remove dry and dead skin. 7. Once a week, I apply Clinique Clarifying Lotion 2 with a cotton ball to my face and throat to remove deep-down dirt and oils. 8. Once every three months, I get a professional salon facial to deep-clean my pores. 22Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

23 Culture is Dynamic Evolves because it fills needs Certain factors change culture – Technology – Population shifts – Resource shortages – Wars – Changing values – Customs from other countries Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall23 Chapter Eleven Slide

24 The Measurement of Culture Content Analysis Consumer Fieldwork Value Measurement Instruments 24Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

25 Content Analysis A method for systematically analyzing the content of verbal and/or pictorial communication. The method is frequently used to determine prevailing social values of a society. 25Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

26 Which Cultural Value Is Portrayed, and How So? 26Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

27 Progress – The Fridge has Superior Design 27Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

28 Which Cultural Value Is This Ad Stressing, and How So? 28Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

29 Fitness and Health – Low Calorie 29Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

30 Consumer Fieldwork Field Observation – Natural setting – Subject unaware – Focus on observation of behavior Participant Observation 30 Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

31 Value Measurement Survey Instruments Rokeach Value Survey (RVS) A self-administered inventory consisting of eighteen terminal values (i.e., personal goals) and eighteen instrumental values (i.e., ways of reaching personal goals) List of Values (LOV) A value measurement instrument that asks consumers to identify their two most important values from a nine- value list that is based on the terminal values of the Rokeach Value Survey Values and Lifestyles (VALS) A value measurement based on two categories: self-definition and resources 31Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

32 American Core Values Criteria for Value Selection The value must be pervasive. The value must be enduring. The value must be consumer-related. 32Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

33 American Core Values Achievement and success Activity Efficiency and practicality Progress Material comfort IndividualismFreedom External conformity HumanitarianismYouthfulness Fitness and health 33Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

34 American Core Values 34Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

35 Scale to Measure Attitude Toward Helping Others Attitude toward helping others (AHO) People should be willing to help others who are less fortunate Helping troubled people with their problems is very important to me People should be more charitable toward others in society People in need should receive support from others 35 Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

36 Discussion Questions Have you observed changes in any of the core values over the past 4 years? Why did those changes occur? How have they affected marketers? 36Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

37 Toward a Shopping Culture Is shopping what we do to create value in our lives? The younger generation is shopping more This has an effect on credit card debt 37Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide

38 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Printed in the United States of America. Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 38Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallChapter Eleven Slide


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