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Self- evaluation: A question of voice. CH. 1 THE GLOBAL CONTEXT CH. 2 HEARING VOICES? The new leadership CH. 3 MAKING SELF-EVALUATION WORK A STORY IN.

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Presentation on theme: "Self- evaluation: A question of voice. CH. 1 THE GLOBAL CONTEXT CH. 2 HEARING VOICES? The new leadership CH. 3 MAKING SELF-EVALUATION WORK A STORY IN."— Presentation transcript:

1 Self- evaluation: A question of voice

2 CH. 1 THE GLOBAL CONTEXT CH. 2 HEARING VOICES? The new leadership CH. 3 MAKING SELF-EVALUATION WORK A STORY IN THREE CHAPTERS

3 A GLOBAL MOVEMENT Government intervention School based management Power downAccountability up

4 A GLOBAL MOVEMENT Government intervention School based management Inspection/review Self-evaluation

5 A GLOBAL MOVEMENT Government intervention Local school management The accountability improvement interface

6 MISTAKES WE HAVE MADE 1. Big cats 2. Naming and shaming 3. Snoopervision 4. Destruction of trust 5. Lack of respect for professionalism 6. Overprescription 7. Pre-empting and narrowing quality 8. Raising the stakes 9. The rhetoric gap 10. Deafness to voice

7 CHAPTER 2 HEARING VOICES THE NEW LEADERSHIP?

8 The Leadership Quartet Distributed leadership Authoritarian leadership Strategic leadership Invitational leadership

9 silenced voice

10 It is in the counter weight and balance of the fluctuating acoustic of teachers, pupils and parents voices that cultures either flourish or diminish. The ability to listen and tune in to harmonies and discords marks out effective leadership and it is in the management of the blend that school improvement is realised. THE ACOUSTIC OF THE SCHOOL

11 MANAGING THE ACOUSTIC OF THE SCHOOL Student voice(s) Teacher voices(s) Principals voice Support staff voice(s) Parents voice(s) External voices Media voice (s)

12 HOW MUCH CONSENSUS? Organizations require a minimal degree of consensus but not so much as to stifle the discussion that is the lifeblood of innovation. The constant challenge of contrasting ideas is what sustains and renews organizations. Schools that play safe, driven by external mandates and limiting conceptions of improvement set tight parameters around what can be said and what can be heard. They are antithetical to the notion of a learning organisation which, by definition, is always challenging its own premises and ways of being. Adapted from Genady and Evans (1999, p. 368),

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14 Power Distance – demand for egalitarianism as against acceptance of the unequal distribution of power Individualism-Collectivism - interdependent roles and obligations to the group as against self-sufficiency Masculinity-Femininity - endorsement of modesty, compromise and co-operative success as against competition and aggressive success Uncertainty Avoidance - tolerating ambiguity as against preferring rules and set procedures HOFSTEDES TEST OF CULTURE

15 Japan Mexico UAE USA UK

16 RankArea 1 Agreement on Principles.-The ability and goodwill of all groups of people at school to agree on their own ground rules. 2 Vision Creation and Process of Aiming at it. -All stakeholders (management, teachers, pupils, other employees) work to create a shared idea of school future. 3 School Openness.-Cooperation and communication of the school with parents, municipal authorities and ministry of education. 4 Management and Administration Styles.-. From management based on extrinsic motivation (rewards, formal rules) to intrinsic motivation. 5 School Development and Change.-Gradual and systematic change.Freedom to experiment with new approaches. 6 Support from Colleagues.- Experience exchanges, professional dialogue and cooperation with colleague-teachers. Using the feedback from colleagues. 7 School Physical Environment.- School's location, buildings, equipment and its optimal use. 8 Professional Growth Support.- for the school employees' personal and professional growth, creation of conditions for employees' further training and development 9 Informal School Life.-People identify themselves with the school's symbols, they are proud of their school. Customs and traditions are carried over at communal meetings. 10 Working with Conflicts.-Ways of solving conflicts, working with "problem" people.

17 The fact that I am telling you what to do requires: (a) that I know what to tell you to do (b) that you are willing to consent to my telling you what to do (c) that you actually know how to do what Im telling you to do If any of these conditions fails, control loses its power to produce collective action. LOCUS OF CONTROL

18 formally incrementally strategically opportunistically culturally pragmatically DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP

19 formally incrementally strategically opportunistically culturally pragmatically DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP

20 THEORIES OF CHANGE External accountability or Internal accountability

21 THEORIES OF CHANGE Big cats or Small butterflies

22 THE WHO THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CHANGE 1. The rule of the vital few: A few exceptional people doing something different start and incubate an epidemic. 2. The stickiness factor: Some attribute of the epidemic allows it to endure long enough to "catch", to become contagious or "memorable". 3. The power of context: The physical, social and group environment must be right to allow the epidemic to then suffuse through the population. (Gladwell, 1999)

23 CONTROL The principal assumes responsibility for telling teachers and students what to do in such a way that the result of the work of individuals in classrooms aggregates to a coherent result at the level of the school. CO-ORDINATION Individuals and groups assume responsibility and agree to coordinate their behavior with an agreed goals in such a way that it produces a coherent and sutainable result.

24 Wide variability among teachers in classroom practice Low agreement on whether the school can actually affect student learning in the face of community influences Little understanding of conditions which affect motivation and learning Limited ways of finding out what is actually happening in classrooms. WEAK INTERNAL ACCOUNTABILITY

25 High agreement among teachers on what good learning looks like Identification of conditions which support and affect learning High agreement on the aims of the school in influencing student learning Visible norms and practices for evaluating the work of teachers and students. STRONG INTERNAL ACCOUNTABILITY

26 LEADERS AS Mediators Learners Followers Vulnerable

27 The Yang of leadership in action Can you lead your people without seeking to control? Can you open and close the gates in harmony with nature? Can you be understanding Without trying to be wise? Can you create without possessiveness? A ccomplish without taking credit? Lead without ego? T his is the highest power. Tao, 10

28 CHAPTER 3 MAKING SELF-EVALUATION WORK: the challenge to leadership

29 THREE MODELS Parallel Sequential Collaborative

30 Self-evaluation as the focus Shorter period of insepction Sharper focus Little or no notice for inspection Appointment of critical friend Public reporting of results Special measures for failing schools Light touch for successful schools

31 INGREDIENTS OF SUCCESSFUL SELF-EVALUATION purpose framework criteria toolsprocess product purpose ? criteria tools process product purpose framework criteria tools process ? purpose framework ? tools process product purpose framework criteria ? process product purpose framework criteria tools ? product ? framework criteria tools process product

32 A QUESTION OF PURPOSE: ENGLAND

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34 Norway

35 Netherlands-Purposes

36 25.6% 2.4% 8.5% 37.8% 2.4% 20.7% 2.4% school factors school background Tr-pupil relationship pupil motivation pupils' attitudes value added performance -KS test THE COMPONENTS OF SELF-EVALUATION

37 COMPONENTS: HONG KONG

38 INHIBITING OF SELF-EVALUATION: HK Time, heart Schools not prepared Staff do not have the skills Staff do not have the time and energy to do all this Work load and documentation Reform and continual organisation development Self complacency, pride and prejudice Dead wood among the staff Beliefs of teachers How to use data Resistance from teachers due to misconceptions Anxiety over school self-evaluation

39 PROMOTING OF SELF-EVALUATION: HK Mutual trust among teachers Teachers reflective thinking Self motivation for continuous improvement Time for preparation Attitudes, culture Skills and attitude of being a reflective practitioner Confidence in facing changes A school culture which promotes learning A principal who facilitates changes Collaboration and trust among the staff Workshops for teachers Training (to realise the value of self-evaluation) Security leading to improvement rather than a final verdict

40 Ownership comparability External and compliant Internal and compliant Ownership but only internal Ownership and External

41 Ownership comparability External and compliant Internal and compliant Ownership but only internal Ownership and External

42 Transformational leadership seeks to generate second-order effects. Transformational leaders increase the capacity of others in the school to produce first-order effects on learning (Hallinger, 2003) FIRST AND SECOND O RDER LEARNING

43 LEARNING AS INVISIBLE …..to get that far, one has to get past the problem of invisibility. A large part of the challenge is that the very invisibility of thinking is itself invisible. We don't notice how easily thinking can stay out of sight, because we are used to it being that way. As educators, our first task is perhaps to see the absence, to hear the silence, to notice what is not there. (Perkins, 2004, p6)

44 The task of leadership is to make visible the how of learning. It achieves this by conversations and demonstrations around pupil learning, professional learning and organisational (or systems) learning. Leadership nurtures the dialogue, extends the practice and helps makes transparent ways in which these three levels interconnect. It promotes a continuing restless inquiry into what works best, when, where, for whom and with what outcome. Its vision is of the intelligent school and its practice intersects with the wider world of learning. MAKING LEARNING VISIBLE

45 pupil learning teacher learning school learning THE LEARNING WEDDING CAKE

46 MEASURED ATTAINMENT LIFELONG LEARNING INDIVIDUAL PUPIL COMMUNITY OF LEARNERS THE CLASSROOM SEAT THE NATURAL AND SOCIAL WORLD REPRODUCTION OF THE CURRICULUM PASSIVE CONUMPTION MULTIPLE AVENUES OF INQUIRY THE SCHOOL DAY WHAT WHERE WHY HOW WHEN WHERE WHAT WHO WHY HOW WHEN OPPORTUNSTIC LEARNING LEARNING HOW TO LEARN WHO

47 SMALL THINGS THAT MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE Wait time No marks No hands up No right answers No praise/ nor criticism Tests devised by pupils

48 Heads Pupils Middle managers Teachers Support staff Parents Authority Pedagogic knowledge Community networks Organisational knowledge Vision for the future Self-evaluation expertise Change champions

49 System learning Building capacity

50 System learning Building capacity

51 TOXINS ideas rejected or stolen constant carping criticisms being ignored being judged being overdirected not being listened to being misunderstood Southworth, 2000

52 NUTRIENTS being valued being encouraged being noticed being trusted being listened to being respected Southworth, 2000

53 PRINCIPLES OF SSE/ESR 1.Clarity of purpose 2.Starting where teachers are 3.The important rather than the urgent 4.Transfer of agency 5.Reciprocity – the me-too-you-too principle 6.Listening with intent to understand 7.Putting learning centre stage 8.Celebrating diversity 9.Diminishing the power distance 10.Demonstrating trust

54 « Tu te jugeras donc toi-même, cest le plus difficile. Il est bien plus difficile de se juger soi-même que de juger autrui. Si tu réussis à bien te juger, cest que tu es un véritable sage. » Est-ce ça lautoévaluation?

55 If you think youre too small to make a difference, youve never been in bed with a mosquito.


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