Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Pushmina S.A.. Leibnizian concept, philosophers of the analytic school [Kripke (1981), Lewis (1968), Hintikka (1980)], a group of literary scholars [Eco.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Pushmina S.A.. Leibnizian concept, philosophers of the analytic school [Kripke (1981), Lewis (1968), Hintikka (1980)], a group of literary scholars [Eco."— Presentation transcript:

1 Pushmina S.A.

2 Leibnizian concept, philosophers of the analytic school [Kripke (1981), Lewis (1968), Hintikka (1980)], a group of literary scholars [Eco (1984), Pavel (1989), Dolezel (2000)], Ryan M.-L.

3 the basis of the theory is the set-theoretical idea that reality - the sum of the imaginable - is a universe composed of a plurality of distinct elements. This universe is hierarchically structured by the opposition of one well-designated element, which functions as the centre of the system, to all the other members of the set. The resulting structure is known as modal system, or M-model (Kripke).

4 The central element is commonly interpreted as the actual world, and the satellites as merely possible worlds. For a world to be possible it must be linked to the centre by a so-called accessibility relation. The boundary between possible and impossible worlds depends on the particular interpretation given to the notion of accessibility. The most common interpretation associates possibility with logical laws; every world that respects the principles of non-contradiction and the excluded middle is a PW.. The theory of Mary-Laure Ryan

5 to recognize its complexity and to formulate an appropriate analytical structure through which this complexity can be made more manageable [Qavins (2007)]. Text World Theory

6 1. The PW imagined and asserted by the author, which consists of all the states presented as actual by the fabula; 2. The possible subworlds that are imagined, believed, wished (etc.) by the characters; 3. The possible subworlds that the reader imagines, believes, wishes (etc.) in the course of reading, and that the fabula either actualises or counterfactualises by taking another fork.

7 N.Cheremisina and N. Novikova : every situation (with its time, space, and personages) is a small world [Novikova (2000)]. Daniel McIntyre: there are numerous deictic fields in the fictional narration [Mc Intyre (2003)].

8 by deixis is meant the location and identification of persons, events, processes and activities being talked about, or referred to, in relation to the spatiotemporal context created and sustained by the act of utterance and the participation in it, typically, of a single speaker and at least one addressee [Lyons 1977:637].

9 1.Place; 2.Temporal; 3.Person; 4. Social; 5. Empathetic.

10

11 The Forsyte Saga: The Man of Property,1964. – 464p.; The Forsyte Saga: In Chancery/ Book 2, – 304p.; The Forsyte Saga: To Let/ Book 3,1975. – 255p.

12 Microworld of Irene in her youth; Microworld of Irene in the house of Soames Forsyte; Microworld of Irene the Forsyte family; Microworld of Irene Heron.

13 Deictic categories: D1: Bournemouth, D2: spring of the year 1881, D3: Irene, D4: stepdaughter of Mrs. Heron, D5: affection. Reference: Irene Heron, she.. "Who is that girl with yellow hair and dark eyes?" he asked. "That oh! Irene Heron. Her father, Professor Heron, died this year. She lives with her stepmother. She's a nice girl, a pretty girl, but no money!" "Introduce me, please," said Soames. It was very little that he found to say, nor did he find her responsive to that little. But he went away with the resolution to see her again. He effected his object by chance, meeting her on the pier with her stepmother, who had the habit of walking there from twelve to one of a forenoon. Soames made this lady's acquaintance with alacrity, nor was it long before he perceived in her the ally he was looking for. His keen scent for the commercial side of family life soon told him that Irene cost her stepmother more than the fifty pounds a year she brought her; it also told him that Mrs. Heron, a woman yet in the prime of life, desired to be married again. The strange ripening beauty of her stepdaughter stood in the way of this desirable consummation

14 . " The microworld of Irene and Soames Forsyte love – hate – error – property – evil – fear – pain – pleasure – marriage – superiority – secret – resentment – vice – punishment – contempt – triumph – crime; The microworld of Irene and Philip Bosinney love – amusement – agreement – beauty – fear – pain; The microworld of Irene and Jolyon Forsyte love – feelings – poetry – relief – choice – beauty – hope; The microworld of Irene and her son Jolyon love – teaching – beauty – fear – secret – distance – lie.

15 Awakening, p 270: "All right, old man, you go and love her." Key-word «love» To Let, part 1, chapter 3, page 34: Still there was Jon, more important in her life than himself; Jon, who adored his mother. Key-word «love» To Let, part 1, chapter 6, page 57: He was eager, but did not gush; he was a splendid listener, sympathetic, reticent about himself. He evidently loved their father, and adored his mother. Key-word «love» To Let, part 3, chapter 6, page 204): "I know I told you a lie, Jon. But I told it out of love." "Yes, oh! yes! That's nothing!" Key-word «love»

16

17

18


Download ppt "Pushmina S.A.. Leibnizian concept, philosophers of the analytic school [Kripke (1981), Lewis (1968), Hintikka (1980)], a group of literary scholars [Eco."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google