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JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/061 R.W.Bro. Phil Zubrycki Empire Lodge No.127, G.R.M., A.F. & A.M.

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Presentation on theme: "JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/061 R.W.Bro. Phil Zubrycki Empire Lodge No.127, G.R.M., A.F. & A.M."— Presentation transcript:

1 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/061 R.W.Bro. Phil Zubrycki Empire Lodge No.127, G.R.M., A.F. & A.M.

2 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/062

3 3

4 4 system A beautiful system of Morality Veiled in Allegory and illustrated by symbols What is Freemasonry? (The Work, 1996, p.62)

5 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/065 The Masonic System of Morality The veiled allegory directs us to the moral virtues. Much like a person making their way through a fog of misinterpretation, misdirection, and false assumptions the allegory remains mysterious, and obscured.

6 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/066 The Masonic System of Morality The symbols represent the moral virtues we endeavor to emulate and inculcate.

7 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/067 ILLUSTRATED BY SYMBOLS

8 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/068 ILLUSTRATED BY SYMBOLS The Symbols may be pictures or words. secrecy fidelity obedience virtue honour mercy temperance fortitude prudence justice faith hope charity benevolence These symbols are defined as each individual perceives them and understands their meaning.

9 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/069 ILLUSTRATED BY SYMBOLS The Symbols may be pictures or words. These symbols are defined as each individual perceives and understands their meaning. secrecy fidelity obedience virtue honour mercy temperance fortitude prudence justice faith hope charity benevolence

10 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0610 The Masonic System of Morality temperance fortitude prudence justice faith hope charity benevolence secrecy fidelity obedience virtue honour mercy

11 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0611 What are these virtues? What do they represent?

12 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0612 Temperance Is that due restraint upon the affections and passions which renders the body tame and governable, and frees the mind from the allurements of vice.

13 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0613 Fortitude Is that noble and steady purpose of the mind, whereby we are enabled to undergo any pain, peril or danger, when prudently deemed expedient.

14 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0614 Prudence Teaches us to regulate our lives and actions agreeably to the dictates of reason, and is that habit by which we wisely judge and carefully determine, on all things relative to our present, as well as to our future happiness.

15 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0615 Justice Is that Standard, or boundary of right, which enables us to render to every man his just due, without distinction.

16 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0616 Virtue A particular moral excellence. ( Websters New Collegiate Dictionary, 1974)

17 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0617 Honour A keen sense of ethical conduct: INTEGRITY, ones word given as a guarantee of performance ( Websters New Collegiate Dictionary, 1974)

18 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0618 Mercy MERCY implies compassion that forebears punishing even when justice demands it or that extends help even to the lowliest or most undeserving ( Websters New Collegiate Dictionary, 1974)

19 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0619 Faith firm belief in something for which there is no proof ( Websters New Collegiate Dictionary, 1974) faith in God (The Work, 1996, p.53)

20 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0620 Hope desire accompanied by expectation of or belief in fulfillment ( Websters New Collegiate Dictionary, 1974) Hope in immortality (The Work, 1996, p.53)

21 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0621 Charity Charity, comprehends the whole… (The Work, 1996, p.53) Love of all mankind ( Websters New Collegiate Dictionary, 1974)

22 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0622 Benevolence To do good, an act of kindness, or a generous gift. ( Websters New Collegiate Dictionary, 1974)

23 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0623 Loyalty unswerving in allegiance ( Websters New Collegiate Dictionary, 1974) … a lively sense of the value of the institution of ones country and of ones fellow citizens together with an earnest will and endeavour to preserve the one and serve the other. (The Work, 1996, p.59)

24 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0624 Obedience submission to laws and authority ( Websters New Collegiate Dictionary, 1974) …be proved by a close conformity to all our laws and regulations……and by a perfect submission to the Master and his Wardens whilst acting in the discharge of their respective duties. (The Work, 1996, p.59)

25 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0625 Secrecy Marked by the habit of discretion. Something kept from the knowledge of others or shared confidentially with a few. ( Websters New Collegiate Dictionary, 1974) Secrecy may be said to consist in the inviolable adherence to the obligations you have entered into, never to improperly reveal…. (The Work, 1996, p.59) In the early lectures of the last century, now obsolete these questions were used as a test: Q - Have you any keys to the secrets of a Mason? A - Yes. Q - Where do you keep them? A -in a bone box, that neither opens nor shuts but with Ivory Keys The Bone Box is the mouth, the Ivory Keys the teeth. The key to the secrets is the tongue. BONE BOX by William Ray Fischer Http://users.1st.net/fischer/SHORT48.HTM

26 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0626 Fidelity The quality or state of being faithful, showing allegiance, or loyalty. ( Websters New Collegiate Dictionary, 1974) We lock up our secrets in the safe and sacred repository of our heart with fidelity….. (The Work, 1996, p.18) … fidelity must be exemplified by a strict observance of the constitution of the fraternity; by adhering to the landmarks of the order:… (The Work, 1996, p.59)

27 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0627 What are the principles of Freemasonry?

28 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0628 Are the fundamental principles of Freemasonry. (The Work, 1996, p.56) Brotherly Love, Relief, and Truth

29 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0629 All of humanity is of one parent and all Masons are brothers of one large family of all humanity and specially one Mason with another. temperance fortitude prudence justice virtue honour mercy Brotherly Love

30 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0630 To relieve the distressed is a duty of all Masons, and particularly with our brothers. Together We form a chain of sincere affection. faith hope charity benevolence Relief

31 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0631 Truth is the foundation of every virtue. Hypocrisy and deceit are unknown among us. Sincerity and plain dealing will distinguish us. The heart and tongue will join in promoting each others welfare and rejoice in each others prosperity. secrecy fidelity obedience Truth

32 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0632 Why are the columns of special importance? Our Lodges are supported by three pillars

33 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0633 Our Lodges are supported by three pillars WISDOM STRENGTH & BEAUTY IonicCorinthianDoric

34 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0634 WISDOMWISDOM STRENGTHSTRENGTH BEAUTYBEAUTY system A beautiful system of Morality Brotherly Love Relief Truth temperance fortitude prudence justice virtue honour mercy Faith hope charity benevolence secrecy fidelity obedience loyalty

35 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0635 system A beautiful system of Morality makes good men better.

36 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0636 Masonry makes good men better. Masonry makes good men better. It is in the Entered Apprentice degree the newly initiated brother gets his instruction to build his moral future, his Masonic Character, and his Grand Lodge above. Wisdom Strength Beauty Brotherly Love Relief Truth Master Sr. WardenJr.Warden

37 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0637 fidelity fidelity must be exemplified by a strict observance of the constitution of the fraternity; by adhering to the landmarks landmarks of the order:… (The Work, 1996, p.59)

38 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0638 What is a Landmark?

39 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0639 The term "Landmark" is found in Proverbs 22:28: "Remove not the ancient landmark which thy fathers have set." In ancient times, it was customary to mark the boundaries of land by means of stone pillars. Removal of these would cause much confusion, men having no other guide than these pillars by which to distinguish the limits of their property. Therefore to remove them was considered a heinous crime. Jewish law says "Thou shalt not remove thy neighbours' landmark, which they of old time have set in thine inheritance." Hence landmarks are those peculiar marks by which we are able to designate our inheritance. They define what is being passed on to us. In the case of freemasonry, they are called the landmarks of the order. Grand Lodge of British Columbia and Yukon, http://freemasonry.bcy.ca/texts/landmarks.html (2005, Oct.)

40 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0640 1.The modes of RECOGNITION. 2.THE DIVISION OF SYMBOLIC MASONRY INTO THREE DEGREES. 3.The Legend of the THIRD DEGREE. 4.THE GOVERNMENT OF THE FRATERNITY BY A PRESIDING OFFICER called a Grand Master. 5.The prerogative of the Grand Master to preside over every assembly of the craft. 6.The prerogative of the Grand Master to grant Dispensations for conferring degrees at irregular times. 7.The prerogative of the Grand Master to give dispensations for opening and holding Lodges. 8.The prerogative of the Grand Master to make masons at sight. 9.The necessity of masons to congregate in lodges. 10.The government of the craft, when so congregated in a Lodge by a Master and two Wardens. 11.The necessity that every lodge, when congregated, should be duly tiled. 12.The right of every mason to be represented in all general meetings of the craft and to instruct his representatives. 13.The Right of every mason to appeal from the decision of his brethren in Lodge convened, to the Grand Lodge or General Assembly of Masons. 14.THE RIGHT OF EVERY MASON TO VISIT and sit in every regular Lodge. 15.No visitor, unknown as a Mason, can enter a Lodge without first passing an examination according to ancient usage 16.No Lodge can interfere in the business of another Lodge, nor give degrees to brethren who are members of other Lodges 17.Every freemason is Amenable to the Laws and Regulations of the masonic jurisdiction in which he resides. 18.Qualifications of a candidate: that he shall be a man, unmultilated, free born, and of mature age. 19.A belief in the existence of God. 20.Subsidiary to this belief in God, is the belief in a resurrection to a future life. 21.A "Book of the Law" shall constitute an indispensable part of the furniture of every Lodge. 22.THE EQUALITY OF ALL MASONS. 23.The secrecy of the institution. 24.The foundation of a Speculative Science, for purposes of religious or moral teaching. 25.These Landmarks can never be changed. The Landmarks of Freemasonry, as compiled by Albert Mackey in 1858, Grand Lodge of British Columbia and Yukon, http://freemasonry.bcy.ca/grandlodge/landmarks.html(2005, Oct.)

41 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0641 The Landmarks of Freemasonry, as compiled by Albert Mackey in 1858, are not universally accepted; they are not really landmarks at all. For example, the "three" degrees of Craft Freemasonry aren't a landmark. The Third Degree didn't exist at the time of the formation of the first Grand Lodge in England. Landmark 8 is also a controversial item in some jurisdictions. Landmark 14 is noteworthy since in some jurisdictions, visiting is considered a privilege. Landmark 20, regarding resurrection, raises theological questions which some jurisdictions feel unqualified to address. This enumeration of Landmarks has not been accepted or authorized by this Grand Lodge and is only presented as an historical document. The Landmarks of Freemasonry, as compiled by Albert Mackey in 1858, Grand Lodge of British Columbia and Yukon, http://freemasonry.bcy.ca/grandlodge/landmarks.html(2005, Oct.)

42 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0642 The best writers are unanimous on two essential points, the two point test: a landmark must have existed from the "time whereof the memory of man runneth not to the contrary" and a landmark is an element in the form or essence of the Society of such importance that Freemasonry would no longer be freemasonry if it were removed. In other words, they are something perpetual and unchanging. Grand Lodge of British Columbia and Yukon, http://freemasonry.bcy.ca/texts/landmarks.html (2005, Oct.)

43 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0643 In attempting to define the definition of an Ancient Landmark there are two essential points that must be seriously taken into consideration: 1. It must have existed from the time whereof the memory of man runneth not to the contrary. 2. It must be an element in the form or essence of the society of such importance that Freemasonry would no longer be Freemasonry if it were removed. (Masonic Civility, Fergusson J.A., p.57)

44 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0644 If we accept the fact that an Ancient Landmark is such that it existed from the time whereof the memory of man runneth not to the contrary, then we cannot in all honesty, attempt to document them in writing, under any circumstances (Masonic Civility, Fergusson J.A., p.57)

45 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0645 system A beautiful system of Morality is a Landmark in every sense of the word.

46 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0646 system A beautiful system of Morality is what Masonry is!

47 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0647 system A beautiful system of Morality - is not written. - is veiled, hidden, a mystery, or a secret. - cannot be held, transferred, or sold - is illustrated to only Freemasons who understand. - is locked in our heart.

48 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0648 system A beautiful system of Morality is a Landmark.

49 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0649 system A beautiful system of Morality is a Landmark. Masonic Morality has existed from before we can remember it not existing

50 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0650 system A beautiful system of Morality is a Landmark. Masonic Morality has existed from before we can remember it not existing Masonic Morality marks a boundary

51 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0651 system A beautiful system of Morality is a Landmark. Masonic Morality has existed from before we can remember it not existing Masonic Morality marks a boundary Masonic Morality is not written

52 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0652 system A beautiful system of Morality is a Landmark. Masonic Morality has existed from before we can remember it not existing Masonic Morality marks a boundary Masonic Morality is not written Masonry would not be Masonry if not for Masonic Morality

53 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0653 system Ans. A beautiful system of Morality Veiled in Allegory and illustrated by symbols Q. What is Freemasonry? (The Work, 1996, p.62) A question to a Masonic Brother:

54 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0654 The answer to the question has not changed since the establishment of Masonry as an organization of men of good moral standing.

55 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0655 We may have FORGOTTEN the importance of this most basic foundation of principle.

56 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0656 Perhaps the application and importance of these values of Moral Virtue have lost their prominence in our labour.

57 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0657 However I would prefer to believe that: - These most basic values inculcated in the first degree may be so firmly integrated into our behavior that we practice them without conscious thought and forget the source of our wisdom, strength, and beauty; much like the foundation of a building is out of sight and forgotten, until it should fail.

58 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0658 So what might causes a Freemason to strictly adhere to the basic principles of Freemasonry with that certain strength of conviction all Masonic Brethren profess to hold dear and in high esteem?

59 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0659 We lock up our secrets in the safe and sacred repository of our heart with fidelity….. (The Work, 1996, p.18) … fidelity must be exemplified by a strict observance of the constitution of the fraternity; by adhering to the landmarks landmarks of the order:… (The Work, 1996, p.59)

60 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0660 system A beautiful system of Morality 3 Pillars of WISDOM, STRENGTH & BEAUTY constructed on a base of BROTHERLY LOVE, RELIEF and TRUTH resting on a foundation of MASONIC VIRTUES is the Landmark we must bring to the future

61 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0661 Before We act, think What would a Mason do?.

62 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0662 In conclusion Bringing the Past to the future

63 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0663 In the 21st century Brethren will be openly and honestly discussing the cultural importance of Masonry in terms completely acceptable to a community. heart The heart of Freemasonry can never change, but the face of Freemasonry has been changing imperceptibly, and must continue to change in accordance with the outlook and attitude of a modern day culture if it is to remain relevant. (Allen, Stuart, Senior Grand Warden, G.L. of MB, presented to the Banff Conference)

64 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0664 WISDOM, STRENGTH, & BEAUTY BROTHERLY LOVE, RELIEF and TRUTH MASONIC VIRTUES WISDOM, STRENGTH, & BEAUTY BROTHERLY LOVE, RELIEF and TRUTH MASONIC VIRTUES system A beautiful system of Morality Bringing the Past to the future is the Landmark we must bring to the future

65 JRC Evans Memorial Lecture 2005/0665 is the past we must bring to the future Thank you for your attention. system A beautiful system of Morality Bringing the Past to the future Respectfully submitted by R.W.Bro. Phil Zubrycki The views expressed are entirely those of the author and in no way, shape, or form represent the official position of any official Masonic Organization.


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