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Dante Alighieri Presented by Matt Bonn Bibliography Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems.

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1 Dante Alighieri Presented by Matt Bonn Bibliography Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems

2 Biography The Supreme Poet, Dante Alighieri "Heaven wheels above you, displaying to you her eternal glories, and still your eyes are on the ground." This quote said by Alighieri himself can be used to describe him as a person because he was both religious and wise and he noticed that even though above is the eternal bliss of heaven people still look to the ground in the sorrows of life (Brainy Quote 1). Alighieri was born sometime in 1265 into a noble Florentine family (Amari-Parker 7). Alighieris mother, Gabriella degli Abati, died when Alighieri was seven years old. After the death of Alighieris mother, his father, Alighiero II, who made his living off of renting property and money-lending, remarried. By the time Alighieri was twelve he was promised to Gemma Donati, who would later become his wife. However, Alighieri was already in love with a woman named Beatrice Portinari, who he would stay affectionate for throughout his life. Before Alighieri reached manhood his father died and Brunetto Larini, a politician, became Alighieris father figure in his life. (Liukkonen) One of the most notable events in Alighieris life was the rivalry of Alighieris clan, the Guelphs, who supported the pope and the Ghibellines who supported the German emperor (Amari-Parker 7). Alighieri fought as a cavalryman in the battle of Campaldino in 1289, which led to the defeat of the Ghibellines. However, things were not good with the Guelphs; who divided into two rival factions the White Guelphs, of which Alighieri was a member, and the Black Guelphs. In 1302, with support of the pope the Black Guelphs seized power in Florence, exiling all White Guelphs and promising them theyll be burned alive should they ever return (Merriman). Alighieris exile was spent wandering Northern Italy and was when he produced the majority of his works including his most famous The Divine Comedy (Amari-Parker 7). Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography

3 Not much is known about Alighieris education except that he was well taught in both Christian and classical literature which had a tremendous effect on his works and was the start of them. However, the main inspiration Alighieri had for his poems was Beatrice, his childhood love. Alighieri never mentioned his wife in any of his works, yet he mentioned Beatrice in many of them. One of his sonnets about Beatrice was sent to a poet named Guido Cavalcanti, which was the start of their friendship. Alighieris friendship with his fellow poet Cavalcanti led to Alighieri dedicating his first book, La Vita Nuova, which celebrated Alighieris love for Beatrice (Liukkonen). Alighieris other inspirations were Aristotle, a Greek philosopher, and Virgil, a Roman poet. Alighieri also went on to inspire poets such as Geoffrey Chaucer and William Blake as well as many authors, poets and playwrights today (Merriman). Dante Alighieri is hard to classify under one type of poetry. He wrote in many different styles and forms including sonnets, books, and epic poems. The majority of his ideas came from the classic works he had learned when he was young and from his love Beatrice, who he made out to be semi- divine in his works. Alighieris biggest contribution to poetry and to the Italian language is The Divine Comedy, Alighieris best known work. The Divine Comedy is a narrative poem written in vernacular Italian in terza rima, a concept first used by Alighieri, which is a three line stanza using chain rhyme. The poem is composed of 14,233 lines, arranged into 100 cantos and tells of Dantes journey through Hell to Purgatory and finally to Paradise (or Heaven). The Divine Comedy is the reason the Italian language is what it is today. It is also Alighieris gift to the world taking people today on a journey through the afterlife. In the words of Dante Alighieri, From a little spark may burst a flame. What he meant by this is from the littlest of things something bigger may come. This can be related to many things but I think Alighieri might have been referring to himself, an exile who became the father of the Italian language (Liukkonen). Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography

4 Collected Works Divine Comedy (Inferno, Purgatory, and Heaven) Death, Always Cruel My Lady Carries Love Within her Eyes My Lady Looks so Gentle and so Pure Of Beauty and Duty Of the Lady Pietra degli Scrovigni Whatever While the Thought Comes Over Me Read Poems at Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography

5 Inferno Canto I Midway upon the journey of our life I found myself within a forest dark, For the straightforward pathway had been lost. Ah me! how hard a thing it is to say What was this forest savage, rough, and stern, Which in the very thought renews the fear. So bitter is it, death is little more; But of the good to treat, which there I found, Speak will I of the other things I saw there. I cannot well repeat how there I entered, So full was I of slumber at the moment In which I had abandoned the true way. But after I had reached a mountain's foot, At that point where the valley terminated, Which had with consternation pierced my heart, Upward I looked, and I beheld its shoulders, Vested already with that planet's rays Which leadeth others right by every road. Then was the fear a little quieted That in my heart's lake had endured throughout The night, which I had passed so piteously. And even as he, who, with distressful breath, Forth issued from the sea upon the shore, Turns to the water perilous and gazes; So did my soul, that still was fleeing onward, Turn itself back to re-behold the pass Which never yet a living person left. After my weary body I had rested, The way resumed I on the desert slope, So that the firm foot ever was the lower. And lo! almost where the ascent began, A panther light and swift exceedingly, Which with a spotted skin was covered o'er! And never moved she from before my face, Nay, rather did impede so much my way, That many times I to return had turned. The time was the beginning of the morning, And up the sun was mounting with those stars That with him were, what time the Love Divine At first in motion set those beauteous things; So were to me occasion of good hope, The variegated skin of that wild beast, Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography Analysis

6 The hour of time, and the delicious season; But not so much, that did not give me fear A lion's aspect which appeared to me. He seemed as if against me he were coming With head uplifted, and with ravenous hunger, So that it seemed the air was afraid of him; And a she-wolf, that with all hungerings Seemed to be laden in her meagreness, And many folk has caused to live forlorn! She brought upon me so much heaviness, With the affright that from her aspect came, That I the hope relinquished of the height. And as he is who willingly acquires, And the time comes that causes him to lose, Who weeps in all his thoughts and is despondent, E'en such made me that beast withouten peace, Which, coming on against me by degrees Thrust me back thither where the sun is silent. While I was rushing downward to the lowland, Before mine eyes did one present himself, Who seemed from long-continued silence hoarse. When I beheld him in the desert vast, 'Have pity on me, ' unto him I cried, 'Whiche'er thou art, or shade or real man! ' He answered me: 'Not man; man once I was, And both my parents were of Lombardy, And Mantuans by country both of them. 'Sub Julio' was I born, though it was late, And lived at Rome under the good Augustus, During the time of false and lying gods. A poet was I, and I sang that just Son of Anchises, who came forth from Troy, After that Ilion the superb was burned. But thou, why goest thou back to such annoyance? Why climb'st thou not the Mount Delectable, Which is the source and cause of every joy? ' 'Now, art thou that Virgilius and that fountain Which spreads abroad so wide a river of speech? ' I made response to him with bashful forehead. 'O, of the other poets honour and light, Avail me the long study and great love That have impelled me to explore thy volume! Thou art my master, and my author thou, Thou art alone the one from whom I took The beautiful style that has done honour to me. Behold the beast, for which I have turned back; Do thou protect me from her, famous Sage, For she doth make my veins and pulses tremble.' 'Thee it behoves to take another road, ' Responded he, when he beheld me weeping, 'If from this savage place thou wouldst escape; Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography Analysis

7 Because this beast, at which thou criest out, Suffers not any one to pass her way, But so doth harass him, that she destroys him; And has a nature so malign and ruthless, That never doth she glut her greedy will, And after food is hungrier than before. Many the animals with whom she weds, And more they shall be still, until the Greyhound Comes, who shall make her perish in her pain. He shall not feed on either earth or pelf, But upon wisdom, and on love and virtue; 'Twixt Feltro and Feltro shall his nation be; Of that low Italy shall he be the saviour, On whose account the maid Camilla died, Euryalus, Turnus, Nisus, of their wounds; Through every city shall he hunt her down, Until he shall have driven her back to Hell, There from whence envy first did let her loose. Therefore I think and judge it for thy best Thou follow me, and I will be thy guide, And lead thee hence through the eternal place, Where thou shalt hear the desperate lamentations, Shalt see the ancient spirits disconsolate, Who cry out each one for the second death; And thou shalt see those who contented are Within the fire, because they hope to come, Whene'er it may be, to the blessed people; To whom, then, if thou wishest to ascend, A soul shall be for that than I more worthy; With her at my departure I will leave thee; Because that Emperor, who reigns above, In that I was rebellious to his law, Wills that through me none come into his city. He governs everywhere, and there he reigns; There is his city and his lofty throne; O happy he whom thereto he elects! ' And I to him: 'Poet, I thee entreat, By that same God whom thou didst never know, So that I may escape this woe and worse, Thou wouldst conduct me there where thou hast said, That I may see the portal of Saint Peter, And those thou makest so disconsolate.' Then he moved on, and I behind him followed. Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography Analysis

8 Inferno (Canto I) Analysis Dante Alighieris famous Inferno is one of his greatest works; it is well known for two reasons the first being it was the first literary work to be written in vernacular Italian and is believed to be the reason the Italian language is what it is today and the second is that it possess a famous poetic element first used by Alighieri, terza rima. Terza rima is a poetic element composed of three line stanzas using a rhyming chain; however because of translations only the Italian version is composed of rhymes. The first Canto of Inferno tells about Dante a man lost from the path of God wandering a dark forest unable to find the path back to the Lord. The poem tells an entire story while sticking to the terza rima format as seen from these two stanzas describing Dante being lost; Midway upon the journey of our life / I found myself within a forest dark, / For the straightforward pathway had been lost. /Ah me! how hard a thing it is to say / What was this forest savage, rough, and stern, / Which in the very thought renews the fear. Throughout the poem very rarely did Alighieri break this format and yet somehow it is still descriptive and flows smoothly. Alighieri might have chosen this format because there three is a holy number in his Christian religion, he might have also used it to symbolize the three books in the trilogy Paradise, Purgatory, and Hell or he might have used it because like any good poet he had an idea and he used it. For whatever reason Alighieri wrote like he did there is no denying that Inferno is a masterpiece and it along with all the new poetic devices Alighieri used were his gifts to poetry. Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography

9 This poem really stuck out to me not because it was just some love poem but because of why the poem was written. This poem was written for a woman named Beatrice, Dante Alighieris love. However Alighieri was promised to another woman and even though he was wed he still remained in love with his childhood love and never forgot her beauty and grace. My Lady Carries Love Within Her Eyes By: Dante Alighieri My lady carries love within her eyes; All that she looks on is made pleasanter; Upon her path men turn to gaze at her; He whom she greeteth feels his heart to rise, And droops his troubled visage, full of sighs, And of his evil heart is then aware: Hate loves, and pride becomes a worshiper. O women, help to praise her in somewise. Humbleness, and the hope that hopeth well, By speech of hers into the mind are brought, And who beholds is blessèd oftenwhiles, The look she hath when she a little smiles Cannot be said, nor holden in the thought; 'Tis such a new and gracious miracle. Introduction Poems Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography

10 No matter how many times I reread this poem I always come to a different conclusion of what it is about. The poem starts out fairly simple to understand with Alighieri having two women on his mind one beautiful and one wise. However once Alighieri throws in the word duty the poem becomes less simple and its then that the reader has to interpret it in their own way. Of Beauty and Duty By: Dante Alighieri Two ladies to the summit of my mind Have clomb, to hold an argument of love. The one has wisdom with her from above, For every noblest virtue well designed: The other, beauty's tempting power refined And the high charm of perfect grace approve: And I, as my sweet Master's will doth move, At feet of both their favors am reclined. Beauty and Duty in my soul keep strife, At question if the heart such course can take And 'twixt the two ladies hold its love complete. The fount of gentle speech yields answer meet, That Beauty may be loved for gladness sake, And Duty in the lofty ends of life. Introduction Poems Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography

11 Inspired Poems My Lady Looks so Gentle and so Pure By: Dante Alighieri My lady looks so gentle and so pure When yielding salutation by the way, That the tongue trembles and has naught to say, And the eyes, which fain would see, may not endure. And still, amid the praise she hears secure She walks with humbleness for her array; Seeming a creature sent from Heaven to stay On earth, and show a miracle made sure. She is so pleasant in the eyes of men That through the sight the inmost heart doth gain A sweetness which needs proof to know it by: And from between her lips there seems to move A soothing essence that is full of love, Saying for ever to the spirit, "Sigh!" Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography

12 Inspired Poems My Mother Scolds and Yells at Me By: Matt Bonn (inspired by Dante Alighieri) My mother scolds and yells at me When she catches me being bad, That her tongue never stops screeching I am amazed, And the eyes, I try not to see, filled with wrath and tears. And still, amid the anger she hears my protest She leaves after she makes her point; Seeming a creature of the dark spawn of night On earth, should she not be allowed. She is so evil and filled with phantom hatred That through seeing her, my soul becomes slightly darker A mothers love be underneath her anger: And perhaps it be me who is the one who is at fault A sudden realization of my fault comes, Saying and cursing forever, Oh be gone anger that has blinded me! Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography

13 Inspired Poems Death, Always Cruel By: Dante Alighieri Death, always cruel, Pity's foe in chief, Mother who brought forth grief, Merciless judgment and without appeal! Since thou alone hast made my heart to feel This sadness and unweal, My tongue upbraideth thee without relief. And now (for I must rid thy name of ruth) Behoves me speak the truth Touching thy cruelty and wickedness: Not that they be not known; but ne'ertheless I would give hate more stress With them that feed on love in very sooth. Out of this world thou hast driven courtesy, And virtue, dearly prized in womanhood; And out of youth's gay mood The lovely lightness is quite gone through thee. Whom now I mourn, no man shall learn from me Save by the measure of these praises given. Whoso deserves not Heaven May never hope to have her company. Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography

14 Inspired Poems Death By: Matt Bonn (inspired by Dante Alighieri) Death, always cruel, The taker of sons, the fear of mothers Painful or sweet Joyful or sorrowful Death, always cruel, The entrance to bliss Or the way to damnation Possibly a never ending oblivion Death, always cruel, What gives Death the right to steal away our family and lovers Why does the merciful Lord allow for painful Deaths? Death, always cruel, The merciless end The feared journey Death the cruelest of creatures, The worst of fates Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography

15 The Journey By: Matt Bonn A sea of blissful smiles A valley of frolicking faces An unknown twist All alone masked in emotions Burnt by the dark thoughts And Forgotten in grave danger Where has my gentle God gone The gates of Heaven, replaced by Hells disastrous cliffs The chorus of angles turned to the mournful faces of demons The chaos and torture echoing through the cave While the scorching fire burns the soles of my feet Below me waits my Paradise, Through the sinister caves of Hell There waits my love along with my graceful Lord Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography

16 The Blond By: Matt Bonn The blond curly locks flow down her gentle face The beauty of her seems to much to behold Her grace and elegance I can not believe How could one be so sweet and pure However with that hair comes a faulty personality She trips ups stairs and forgets what shes saying She knows not how to read an analog clock or how to open a lock Yet for some reason I find no problem in it I wonder why? Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography

17 Skyrim By: Matt Bonn Here there be evils Vast in nature and frightening in appearance The last in the lines of those who vanquish the false gods The noble blood does flow unknown A hero must rise to protect his people An unknown peasant to become fabled like the ender of Oblivion Here there be dragons And you must rise to defeat them (based on the upcoming game Skyrim) Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography

18 1) by Petri Liukkonen (biography info) 2) written by C.D. Merriman (biography info) 3) Dantes Divine Comedy Hell~Purgatory~Paradise by Dante Alighieri, edited and with introductory text by Anna Amari-parker (biography info) 4) quote 5) poems 6) Inferno poem Pictures 7) Dante redhttp://www.web-books.com/eLibrary/ON/B1/B1550/07MB1550.html 8) _Dante.htm Dante statue _Dante.htm 9) inferno/ Infernohttp://playstationlifestyle.net/2009/04/22/enter-portable-hell-next-year-with-dantes- inferno/ 10) dante with poemhttp://fiftysophomoricsummers.blogspot.com/2007_05_01_archive.html 11) Divine comedyhttp://ebookee.org/The-Divine-Comedy-of-Dante-Alighieri_ html 12) dante coinhttp://www.lamaisonnumismatique.com/News_Pagina_ html 13) _Inferno_Plate_7_(Beatrice).jpg Beatricehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Gustave_Dor%C3%A9_-_Dante_Alighieri_- _Inferno_Plate_7_(Beatrice).jpg 14) tombhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dantes_tomb_ravenna.jpg 15) death maskhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dante.deathmask.jpg 16) dante 2 bookshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dante_Luca.jpg 17) backgroundhttp://www.thechristianclipart.com/page/3/ 18) skyrimhttp://gamerant.com/elder-scrolls-skyrim-behind-the-scenes-videos-dyce-61501/ Biography Collected Works Sample Poems Inspired Poems Original Poems Bibliography


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