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Get Those Stories Moving! Mary Ann Efner – Occupational Therapist Mary Shands – Librarian NYLA Conference May 1, 2009.

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Presentation on theme: "Get Those Stories Moving! Mary Ann Efner – Occupational Therapist Mary Shands – Librarian NYLA Conference May 1, 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 Get Those Stories Moving! Mary Ann Efner – Occupational Therapist Mary Shands – Librarian NYLA Conference May 1, 2009

2 Outline Why Movement in the classroom? Specific Lesson Plans (10) Pre-K through 5 Other Possibilities Other Resources Supporting Documents Pictures Video Clips

3 Why Use Movement in Library Class? Standing appears to provide a 5 – 15% greater flow of blood and oxygen to the brain and increases attention (Jensen, 1995). Specific movements can stimulate the release of the bodys natural motivators, such as non - adrenaline and dopamine, which wake up learners and help them feel good, maximize their energy levels, and improve their storage of information and retrieval (Jensen, 2000). Multiple Intelligences theory states that our learners all possess, to lesser or greater degrees, a bodily kinesthetic intelligence (Armstrong, 2000; Gardner 1993). Movement energizes the brain bringing attention sensations and motor memory to both language and cognitive processes. It is a way to involve the whole body in learning-enhancing memory and giving added meaning to print. In our OT/library group, it adds to comprehension and reinforces the sequence of story in a powerful and dynamic way. And it always makes learning FUN! All of the students in our Learning Concepts Class, have IEP goals of being able to attend for 5 to 8 minutes. Traditional story telling/library class will not be a successful fit with this IEP goal.

4 Big 6 Task Definition X Information Seeking Strategies X Location and Access X Use of Information X Synthesis X Evaluation NYS Standard English Language Arts 1, 2, 3,4 Arts 1, 3 HPEHE 1 and 2 CDOS LOTE Math Science Technology Social Studies Occupational Therapy Goals: The use of sensory-motor activities to provide: 1. Increased Attention X 2. Self-regulation of the nervous system which impacts on behavior and the ability to organize and filter sensations (visual, auditory, tactile, vestibular). X 3. Facilitate sequential thinking on both cognitive and movement levels. X 4. Develop body awareness in space. X 5. Develop strength and endurance. X 6. Develop motor coordination and motor planning. X 7. Provide hands on learning to give added meaning and comprehension to vocabulary, story sequence. X Title: The SensesGrade: Language Concepts Class Information Skills: Non-fiction book Senses; fiction book on sense My Dog Truffle or My Cat Tuna or Five for a Little One Materials: Non-fiction book on senses; one of the fiction books listed above; Jump and Jive With Hi-5; Die with senses with a picture of a sense on each side; a variety of interesting objects to see, hear, touch, taste, smell. Class Activities: Show the non-fiction book on senses and pick out some interesting facts. Read My Dog Truffle/My Cat Tuna. These are lift the flap books. Have the students guess what Tuna/Truffle, saw, smelled etcetera before they come up and lift the flap. Each student has a turn rolling the die, he/she says what sense it lands on and then chooses an activity to do that engages that sense. Everyone has a turn rolling the die and then the song is played High 5. Students dance and a high 5 is done each time it is sung on the CD. Format revised from Otsego Northern Catskill BOCES School Library System

5 Big 6 Task Definition Information Seeking Strategies Location and Access X Use of Information Synthesis Evaluation NYS Standard English Language Arts 1, 2 and 4 Arts 1 HPEHE 1 and 2 CDOS LOTE Math Science Tech Social Studies Occupational Therapy Goals: The use of sensory-motor activities to provide: 1. Increased Attention X 2. Self-regulation of the nervous system which impacts on behavior and the ability to organize and filter sensations (visual, auditory, tactile, vestibular). X 3. Facilitate sequential thinking on both cognitive and movement levels. X 4. Develop body awareness in space. X 5. Develop strength and endurance. 6. Develop motor coordination and motor planning. X 7. Provide hands on learning to give added meaning and comprehension to vocabulary, story sequence. X Title: Its Simple Said Simon by Mary Ann Hoberman Grade: Learning Concepts Class Information Skills Fiction verses non-fiction Materials: Its Simple Said Simon by Mary Ann Hoberman; a small dog, cat, horse, tiger and something to put them in; a tunnel to swim through. Class Activities: The plot of this book is that Simon meets each of the animals listed above and does an activity with them. While reading the book with the class do the activity with the class as Simon does. After the book is read, one by one each student chooses a dog/cat/horse/tiger from a bag and then the class as a whole engages in the activity that the animal did in the story. For example, the dog growled, the cat jumped, the horse stretched and the tiger swam through the tunnel. Format revised from Otsego Northern Catskill BOCES School Library System

6 Big 6 Task Definition X Information Seeking Strategies X Location and Access X Use of Information X Synthesis X Evaluation NYS Standard English Language Arts 1, 2, 3,4 Arts 1, 3 HPEHE 1 and 2 CDOS LOTE Math Science Technology Social Studies Occupational Therapy Goals: The use of sensory-motor activities to provide: 1. Increased Attention X 2. Self-regulation of the nervous system which impacts on behavior and the ability to organize and filter sensations (visual, auditory, tactile, vestibular). X 3. Facilitate sequential thinking on both cognitive and movement levels. X 4. Develop body awareness in space. X 5. Develop strength and endurance. X 6. Develop motor coordination and motor planning.X 7. Provide hands on learning to give added meaning and comprehension to vocabulary, story sequence. X Title: No More Cookies by Paoeny Lewis Grade: Learning Concepts Class Information Skills: Non-fiction cookbook on cookies, fiction book on cookies Materials: Cookies: A Cookie Lovers Collection by Creative Publishing; No More Cookies by Paoeny Lewis; Cookie Count by Robert Sabuda; fortune cookies with activities inserted in them; big jar to put the lid in with a screw top; a path Class Activities: Show the book, Cookies and discuss how it is non-fiction and how there are cookbooks in the library. Read the book, Cookie Count, have students guess the number and what type of cookie. Sing the song, Who Stole the Cookies From the Cookie Jar. Insert a students name into the song. That student comes up, goes down the path and sneaks a cookie from the cookie jar. He/she breaks the cookie open and there is an activity such as five jumping jacks that the entire class does. Repeat for the number of students in the class so that everyone gets a turn. Format revised from Otsego Northern Catskill BOCES School Library System

7 Big 6 Task Definition X Information Seeking Strategies X Location and Access X Use of Information X Synthesis X Evaluation NYS Standard English Language Arts 1, 2, 3,4 Arts 1, 3 HPEHE 1 and 2 CDOS LOTE Math Science Technology Social Studies Occupational Therapy Goals: The use of sensory-motor activities to provide: 1. Increased Attention 2. Self-regulation of the nervous system which impacts on behavior and the ability to organize and filter sensations (visual, auditory, tactile, vestibular). 3. Facilitate sequential thinking on both cognitive and movement levels. 4. Develop body awareness in space. 5. Develop strength and endurance. 6. Develop motor coordination and motor planning. 7. Provide hands on learning to give added meaning and comprehension to vocabulary, story sequence. Title: CarsGrade: Learning Concepts Class Information Skills: Non-fiction book on cars, fiction books, Red Light Stop Green Light Go by Kulman and Red Light Green Light by Anastasia Suen Materials: Non-fiction books on cars, One or both of the fiction books mentioned above; CD- Twist and Shout; Pieces of paper that have roads made on them; small matchbox cars. Class Activities: Show the variety of non-fiction car books and pick out a couple of interesting facts to discuss. Read either or both of the fiction books listed above. Have set up large pieces of paper with each students name on it. Have the students find their road. Have each student choose a car. Play the song from the CD entitled Red Light! Green Light! Have students stop their cars and stop the music when it is a red light. Format revised from Otsego Northern Catskill BOCES

8 Title: Miss Mary Mack by Mary Ann HobermanGrade: Kindergarten/First Big 6 Task Definition X Information Seeking Strategies X Location and Access X Use of Information X Synthesis Evaluation NYS Standard English Language Arts 1, 2 and 4 Arts 1 HPEHE 1 and 2 CDOS LOTE Math Science Tech Social Studies Occupational Therapy Goals: The use of sensory-motor activities to provide: 1. Increased Attention X 2. Self-regulation of the nervous system which impacts on behavior and the ability to organize and filter sensations (visual, auditory, tactile, vestibular). X 3. Facilitate sequential thinking on both cognitive and movement levels. X 4. Develop body awareness in space. X 5. Develop strength and endurance. X 6. Develop motor coordination and motor planning. X 7. Provide hands on learning to give added meaning and comprehension to vocabulary, story sequence. X Information Skills: Non-fiction Elephant book and discussion of where those books are discussion of fiction and how nursery rhymes are fictional Materials: Miss Mary Mack by Mary Ann Hoberman; non-fiction book on elephants; a stuffed elephant; a trampoline Class Activities: The non-fiction elephant book is read and discussed. Miss Mary Mack is read and discussed. A student helps to demonstrate the hand clapping for Miss Mary Mack. The students are split up into pairs and while one student is jumping on the trampoline, his/her partner takes care of the elephant while the rest of the students do the hand motions to the song. Revised from Otsego Northern Catskill Boces School Library System

9 Big 6 Task Definition X Information Seeking Strategies X Location and Access X Use of Information X Synthesis X Evaluation NYS Standard English Language Arts 1, 2, 3,4 Arts 1, 3 HPEHE 1 and 2 CDOS LOTE Math Science Technology Social Studies Occupational Therapy Goals: The use of sensory-motor activities to provide: 1. Increased Attention X 2. Self-regulation of the nervous system which impacts on behavior and the ability to organize and filter sensations (visual, auditory, tactile, vestibular). X 3. Facilitate sequential thinking on both cognitive and movement levels. X 4. Develop body awareness in space. X 5. Develop strength and endurance. X 6. Develop motor coordination and motor planning X 7. Provide hands on learning to give added meaning and comprehension to vocabulary, story sequence. X Title: The Cheese by Marge Palatini Grades: K, 1, 2 Information Skills: Nursery Rhymes, revised nursery rhymes, fiction. Materials: On a white board or construction paper, have the words to the nursery rhyme, The Farmer in the Dell. Also, The Cheese by Marge Palatini Class Activities: Discuss nursery rhymes, location of, brief history of. Have the students form a circle with the line leader in the middle. Instruct the class to look at the lyrics of the song. The rest of the class joins hands around the person in the middle and sings the first two verses. When the farmer picks a wife, the line leader picks a boy and a girl to come into the circle. Keep having the two new-comers pick the next two. By the end of the song, you want to be the cheese standing alone. Run around the circle crazily singing the cheese stands alone and then tell the students that you played the game to read the book, The Cheese. I usually have the students choral, the cheese stands alone whenever that is stated. Read the book. Look at the white board which has the lyrics of The Farmer in the Dell on it. Ask the class to notice the similarities, which characters are the same, which ones are left out and the pattern, The Cheese, goes backwards from the nursery rhyme. Format revised from Otsego Northern Catskill BOCES School Library System

10 Big 6 Task Definition X Information Seeking Strategies X Location and Access X Use of Information X Synthesis X Evaluation NYS Standard English Language Arts 1, 2, 3,4 Arts 1, 3 HPEHE 1 and 2 CDOS LOTE Math Science Technology Social Studies Occupational Therapy Goals: The use of sensory-motor activities to provide: 1. Increased Attention X 2. Self-regulation of the nervous system which impacts on behavior and the ability to organize and filter sensations (visual, auditory, tactile, vestibular). X 3. Facilitate sequential thinking on both cognitive and movement levels. X 4. Develop body awareness in space. X 5. Develop strength and endurance. X 6. Develop motor coordination and motor planning 7. Provide hands on learning to give added meaning and comprehension to vocabulary, story sequence. X Title: The House that Jack BuiltGrades: K, 1, 2 The Book that Jack Wrote Information Skills: Nursery Rhymes, revised nursery rhymes, fiction. Materials: This is the House that Jack Built, The Book that Jack Wrote. Copy the pages of each book twice and laminate. Put on popsicle sticks and put them in separate boxes. Write the characters from each book up on a white board. Class Activities: Discuss nursery rhymes, location of, brief history of. Present This is the House that Jack Built. Tell students that they will play the parts in the book. Hand out to each student a laminated page on a popsicle stick, double up when you have to. Tell the students that you will read the story and every time their page/character is mentioned they have to stand up. Discuss how at the end of the book, everyone will be standing up. Do the same thing with This is the Book that Jack Wrote but pre-set the students to think about what characters are the same and which ones are different from This is the House that Jack Built. Start the other way with this book so that the other side is standing more often. For fun, see how fast the students can stand up and sit down when their part is read. At the end discuss the characters that are the same and the ones that are different you could even use a graphic organizer to do so. Format revised from Otsego Northern Catskill BOCES School Library System

11 Big 6 Task Definition X Information Seeking Strategies X Location and Access X Use of Information X Synthesis X Evaluation NYS Standard English Language Arts 1, 2, 3,4 Arts 1, 3 HPEHE 1 and 2 CDOS LOTE Math Science Tech 4b and 6 Social Studies Occupational Therapy Goals: The use of sensory-motor activities to provide: 1. Increased Attention X 2. Self-regulation of the nervous system which impacts on behavior and the ability to organize and filter sensations (visual, auditory, tactile, vestibular). X 3. Facilitate sequential thinking on both cognitive and movement levels. X 4. Develop body awareness in space. X 5. Develop strength and endurance. X 6. Develop motor coordination and motor planning X 7. Provide hands on learning to give added meaning and comprehension to vocabulary, story sequence. X Title: BatsGrade: 2 or 3 Information Skills: fiction verses non-fiction on bats Materials: Vampire Bats by Julie Murray and Daft Bat by Jeanne Willis and Tony Ross; yoga windmill pose; white board for discussion of words daft and barmy; Ideally a document camera to show non-fiction book. Class Activities: Read and discuss the book on vampire bats. Focus on part that discusses roosting. Discuss what roosting means. Introduce the book Daft Bat. Introduce the vocabulary words, daft and barmy. Ask the class whether they think these words are compliments/insults. Discuss point of view and point of view in relation to roosting. Read the book Daft Bat and discuss how bat has a different point of view because he is roosting and upside down. As a class do the windmill pose and discuss how your viewpoint would be different if you went around in the world upside down. Format revised from Otsego Northern Catskill BOCES School Library System

12 Big 6 Task Definition X Information Seeking Strategies X Location and Access X Use of Information X Synthesis X Evaluation NYS Standard English Language Arts 1, 2, 3,4 Arts 1, 3 HPEHE 1 and 2 CDOS LOTE Math Science Technology Social Studies Occupational Therapy Goals: The use of sensory-motor activities to provide: 1. Increased Attention X 2. Self-regulation of the nervous system which impacts on behavior and the ability to organize and filter sensations (visual, auditory, tactile, vestibular).X 3. Facilitate sequential thinking on both cognitive and movement levels. X 4. Develop body awareness in space. X 5. Develop strength and endurance. X 6. Develop motor coordination and motor planning. X 7. Provide hands on learning to give added meaning and comprehension to vocabulary, story sequence. X Title: Genre BasketballGrades: Information Skills: Study of literary genres like science fiction, historical fiction, non-fiction, biography, fantasy. You can also use the game the last week of school to review titles read throughout the year. Materials: A variety of books on a cart with, if needed, summaries taped to the back; a garbage can; masking tape; white board to keep score; a ball. Class Activities: Students are split up into two teams, A and B. You read a brief summary of the book and the student from team A has to guess the genre. If he/she has no idea the student may call on someone else on the team A for help. If that person guess correctly, he/she takes a shot at the basket. To get a point for the team the student must accurately answer the question and get the ball in the basket/garbage can. The questioning goes back and forth between the two teams until all students have had a chance to answer. Format revised from Otsego Northern Catskill BOCES School Library System

13 Big 6 Task Definition X Information Seeking Strategies X Location and Access X Use of Information X Synthesis X Evaluation NYS Standard English Language Arts 1, 2, 3,4 Arts 1, 3 HPEHE 1 and 2 CDOS LOTE Math Science Technology Social Studies Occupational Therapy Goals: The use of sensory-motor activities to provide: 1. Increased Attention X 2. Self-regulation of the nervous system which impacts on behavior and the ability to organize and filter sensations (visual, auditory, tactile, vestibular). X 3. Facilitate sequential thinking on both cognitive and movement levels. X 4. Develop body awareness in space. X 5. Develop strength and endurance. X 6. Develop motor coordination and motor planning. X 7. Provide hands on learning to give added meaning and comprehension to vocabulary, story sequence. Title: Use the on-line catalog and find the books Grades: 3-5 Information Skills Use of on-line catalog, location and access of specific genres Materials: At least five computers; half a sheet of paper with specific genres and a place to write call numbers; pencils Class Activities: After an overview of how to use the on-line card catalog, students are split up by counting off into teams of at least five. Each team has a computer. Working together, students must physically find a book from each of the genres and show it to me. Every team that successfully finishes, receives a prize (bookmark). Format revised from Otsego Northern Catskill Boces Library System

14 The Little Engine that Could by PiperTrain – Make a train and as a train orient students to where things are in the library, students collect trains from different areas, regroup and discuss. The Three Little Fish and the Big Bad Shark by Grace and GeistHave students straddle a bolster and fish for Fisher Price fish and say the color fish found. Were Going on a Leaf Hunt by MetzgerHave leaves with students names on them around the room, have students collect them and count them while listening to a song about fall. Roller Coaster by OMalleyStudents are pulled by another student using a hula hoop while on the roller coaster, the scooter board Bark George by FeifferStudents went through the tunnel and then turned over a picture with one of the animals George was and they had to remember the sound made by the animal Goodnight Goon by RexPin the nose on the goony pumpkin The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything by WilliamsStomped along squishy and when they got to a stepping stone with the number that they rolled with the dice, they picked and underneath the stepping stone was an action for the stepping stone Everything You Need to Make a SnowmanThe students did some of the action in the book, climb up the hill bean bag, slid down the hill on the scooter board and then found a body part that the student placed in the correct spot on the full-sized snowman Potato Joe by BakerPassed around musical potato. When it stopped the student with it had to toss the potato on a potato card, turn it over and everyone did the activity on the card. Hop Jump by WalshLilly pads with numbers, students roll the die choose the correct number and then jump that many times on the trampoline and then all dance until music stops Other Possibilities: BookMovement Activity

15 OTHER RESOURCES TO USE FOR STORY AND MOVEMENT Childrens Book of Yoga by Thia Luby Any Laurie Berkner CDs Trampoline Tunnel Bolster Bean Bag Dice Scooter Board Stepping Stones Parachute hula hoops soft vibrating animals Focus Lotion Poppers Any object specific to the story

16 Information Skills A.Library Awareness –concept of a library B.Behavior and Etiquette C.Lifelong Reading Skills – reading for comprehension and enjoyment D.Information problem Solving – Big 6 Task Definition Information Seeking Strategies Location and Access Use of Information Synthesis Evaluation From Otsego Northern Catskill BOCES School Library System NYS Learning Standards ELA (Use Language For) 1.Information and Understanding 2.Literacy Response and Expression 3.Critical Analysis and Evaluation 4.Social Interaction The Arts 1.Engage in Creation and performance 2.Know about, use resources 3.Respond critically 4.Cultural Awareness Health, Physical Education and Home Economics 1.Maintain physical fitness 2.Maintain safe environment 3.Manage personal/community resources Career Development and Occupational Studies 1.Career Awareness 2.Academic Application 3.Foundation skills 4.Career Development Languages Other Than English 1.Communication 2.Cross-cultural skills and understandings Math/Science Technology 1.Scientific inquiries 2.Information systems 3.Mathematics 4a. Physical Setting 4b. Living Environment 5.Technology 6.Interconnectedness Social Studies 1.United States and New York State 2.History 3.Geography 4.Economics 5.Government and Civics

17 Place chairs on desks at end of day or take down at beginning of day Erase the chalkboard/dry erase board Wash desks and/or chalkboard/dry erase board Help rearrange desks in the classroom Help the janitor with emptying wastebaskets, mopping the floor etc., Fill egg crates with books to take to other classrooms. Help the gym teacher move mats, hang them up. Take crunch food breaks such as dry cereal, vegetables, pretzels or popcorn Sharpen pencils with a manual sharpener Cut out items for display from oak tag Have students carry notebooks to the office or from class to class Carry books with both hands hugging the book to the chest Push the lunch cart or carry lunch bin to cafeteria Have students move several packs at a time of Xerox paper from storage area to copy center Use the Ellison cut-out machineClimb on playground equipment Perform sports activities that involve running and jumping Run around the track at schoolHave students push against the walls Fill up big toy trucks with heavy blocks, push with both hands to knock things down. Have the student color a rainbow with large paper on the floor while on hands and knees Play cars under a table in the classroom where the student pushes the car with one hand while creeping and weight bearing on the other hand. Open Doors for peopleUse squeeze toys that can be squeezed quietly on the students lap under the desk so that the student does not disturb the class Do chair push-upsDo animal walksJump on a mini trampolineStack chairs Heavy Work Activities List for Teachers: Compiled and edited by Elizabeth Haber, MS, OTR/L and Deanna Iris Sava, MS, OTR/L The following are activities that provide heavy work activities. All the activities on this handout are naturally occurring activities. This means they can easily be incorporated into the students daily routine within the school environment.

18 Alerting Activities By Yack, 2002 Quick start/stop swinging, bouncing, rolling rocking Touch different textured boardChew peppermint or sour candy Smell strong scents in sachets, film containers, etc. (peppermint, citrus, pine, Vicks Vapor Rub, strong perfumes) Brief spinning with frequent directional changes Hold multi surface fiddle toyEat something crunchyPlay with smelly stickers Jump down from different heights Hold/manipulate cold itemsEat salty citrus, sour or bar-b-q flavored foods Flash lights Rolling on chair with wheelsHold/manipulate cold items (e.g., ice pack) Drink ice waterTrack small flash light Play clapping gameUse different bristles on skinDrink water flavored with lemons Rock music/arrhythmic movement Erase blackboardIntermittent use of fanSuck on ice chipsToys that provide intermittent noises Pass out papers Walk to water fountain Deliver messages Movement Touch Oral Motor/TasteOther

19 Minimize visual clutter Rugs or carpeted surfaces decrease noiseUse scented markers, smelly stickers to alert sensory seekers Turn lights off for calming and on for alerting Place felt or tennis balls on feet of chairsConsider placement of desk in relation to garbage or food items Immediately replace flickering light bulbsReduce volume on intercomsTeachers/aids need to consider use of perfumes, deodorants etc., that might be distracting Experiment with colored acetate over printed materials Consider placement of desk Use an angled surface to place task closer to childs field of vision Provide headphones/earmuffs to muffle sounds Minimize accessories on teachers and aidsPlace student close to teacher if auditory discrimination problems Alter complexity of screen savers on computers Play calming or alerting music through Headphones Use small flashlight to increase attention to visual field Alter volume and animation of teachers/aids voice for calming/alerting Use multi-colored materials to alert Classroom Adaptations and Accommodations Yack, 2002 Visual Auditory Taste/Smell

20 Rocking chair at desk or circle timeWeighted vestAvoid light touch Therapy ball at desk or circle timeWeighted wrist or ankle cuffsWhen physically assisting or touching a student, always approach from the front so that they can anticipate the sensory input. T-stool at deskTight hat, headband, bandanna or barrettes Add tactile input on writing tools for students with poor tactile discrimination (e.g., masking tape/Velcro/silly putty at base of pencil Swinging in class or playground for calming or alerting purposes Body pillow at circle timeHave students with poor tactile discrimination practice printing in sand/kosher salt Rocker board underneath desk to place feet on Bean bag chair at desk or circleUse materials with varied textures to alert, consistent textures to calm Move-sit cushion, sissel cushion, water bottle, wine bladder Padded chair at deskConsider placement of tactile defensive child, may not be able to sit with other students at a table as there would be too much tactile contact Chair or stool with wheelsSit at desk with pillow or large bean bag on lap Schedule day to create gross motor opportunities between activities Padded snake on lap or around shoulders Classroom Adaptations and Accommodations By Ellen Yack, 2002 Movement Deep PressureTouch

21 Calming/Organizing Activities Yack, 2002 Slow rhythmical swinging, rocking, bouncing Hold fidget toyChew gumSmell jars with calming scents (lavender, vanilla, banana, coconut) Seat push-upsStroke soft toy fur animalSuck on mild flavored candySachets with calming scents clothing or on desk Wall push-upsStroke soft material strip on insider of binder or glued underneath desk Slow breathingSoft/rhythmic movement Sit-ups; push-ups; chin-upsHand/body lotionSuck on water bottleWhite noise machine Pull on theraband/bicycle tubing Drink from a narrow or curly straw Mini-water fountains Lift weightsBlow cotton balls or feathersStare at fish swimming in aquarium Play tug of warBlow pens Wheel-barrow walking Move furniture Carry heavy books Progressive relaxation (squeeze and relax) MovementTouch Oral Motor/Taste Other

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