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The Globally Harmonized System for Hazard Classification and Labeling.

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Presentation on theme: "The Globally Harmonized System for Hazard Classification and Labeling."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Globally Harmonized System for Hazard Classification and Labeling

2 EDUCATIONAL MATERIAL USE POLICY The accompanying slides are intended for the sole use of PUR-O-ZONE/PRO-LINK representatives and customers for educational purposes. The entire contents are copyrighted, and use by other organizations or entities is prohibited without written consent. Entire contents copyrighted © 2013, PUR-O-ZONE, Inc. All rights reserved. The information contained in this presentation is deemed accurate. However, circumstances vary, and recommendations presented should be reviewed on-site by qualified personnel before use. Please call your PUR-O-ZONE representative for free consultation. TM

3 Training Goal Understand the changes to the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (Haz Com) Understand the changes to the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (Haz Com) What is GHS? What is GHS? Why was the GHS Developed? Why was the GHS Developed? What are the Benefits of GHS? What are the Benefits of GHS? What are the Changes to Haz Comm Requirements with GHS? What are the Changes to Haz Comm Requirements with GHS? Who does this Impact? Who does this Impact? When Do You Need To Be In Compliance? When Do You Need To Be In Compliance? Review the New 2012 Hazard Communication New Labeling Requirements Overview of the Safety Data Sheets (SDS) format 16 categories

4 What is GHS? GHS is an acronym for G lobal H armonized S ystem for Hazard Classification and Labeling of Chemicals. This program defines and classifies hazards for chemical substances, dilute solutions, and mixtures. This is a common and coherent approach to classify chemicals for a global economy. Communicates information on labels and Safety Data Sheets (SDS). The GHS provides infrastructure for the establishment of national and international comprehensive chemical safety programs.

5 Why was the GHS Developed? To eliminate the variation in chemical classifications and hazards. To provide consistency in phrases used to indicate the severity of hazards, across different hazard types. To offer better employee protection. Information should be conveyed in more than one way for comprehensibility and understanding. Reduces confusion. Enhances understanding of hazards. Helps address literacy and language concerns.

6 What are the Benefits of GHS? It will enhance the human health and the environment. It will reduce the need for testing and evaluation against multiple classification systems, avoiding duplication of efforts. Fewer chemical accidents. Lower health care cost, due to fewer accidents. Improved protection of workers from chemical hazards. Reduction in the cost of enforcement. Expanded use of training programs regarding health and safety. Improved corporate image and credibility. Create awareness of hazards, resulting in safer use of chemicals.

7 What are the Changes to HazCom Compliance with GHS? All Labels have new standards The term MSDS now changes to SDS, with extensive changes. Added : Training on the Labels & SDSs Keep Existing HazCom Training Add information as it comes into the workplace Example: Replace MSDSs with SDSs in your facilitys book Replace Labels and MSDS Training Sections with New Standard Written Program - Mostly Unchanged Definitions have changed Still requires review and update GHS Does NOT Replace a Facility Specific HazCom Program MSDS SDS Material Safety Data Sheet Safety Data Sheet

8 Classification Criteria Class and Category Health Hazards Physical Hazards Environmental Hazards Mixtures (Diluted Products) Hazard Communication Labels Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) Replaces Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) What are the Changes to HazCom Compliance with GHS?

9 Who does this Impact? Manufacturers, Distributors, & Importers Change SDS information and format Change container labeling Employers Training employees on changes to: SDS (change from MSDS to SDS and 16-section format) Container Labels (including secondary containers) Update HazCom training to the new standards Update HazCom written plans to the new standards Employees Recognize and understand hazards based on: Information in new SDS format Pictograms on container labels Precautionary and hazard statements

10 When Do You Need To Be In Compliance? Effective Completion Date Requirement(s)Responsible Party December 1, 2013Train employees on the new Label Elements and SDS Format Employers June 1, 2015Compliance with all modified provisions of the final rule except as noted with different Effective Dates Chemical manufacturers, importers, distributors, and employers December 1, 2015The distributor shall not ship containers labeled by the chemical manufacturer or importer unless it is a GHS label Distributor June 1, 2016All employers shall, as necessary, update any alternative workplace labeling, update the hazard communication program, and provide any additional employee training for newly identified physical or health hazards. Employers

11 Training Goals Understand the changes to the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (Haz Com) What is GHS? Why was the GHS Developed? What are the Benefits of GHS? What are the Changes to Haz Comm Requirements with GHS? Who is Affected? When Do You Need To Be In Compliance? Review the New 2012 Hazard Communication Review the New 2012 Hazard Communication New Labeling Requirements New Labeling Requirements Overview of the Safety Data Sheets (SDS) format 16 categories.

12 New Definition – Hazard Classification & Category Specific criteria for classifying: Health hazards Physical hazards Environmental Hazards (not regulated by OSHA) Each Hazard listed above is assigned a Hazard Class This indicates the nature of the hazard. They also have a Hazard Category The degree of severity within each hazard class 1 = Most Severe4 = Least Severe

13 New Label Elements - Product Standardization for all Product Labels, Each Label Must Include: Product Identifier Supplier Information Signal Word Hazard Pictogram Hazard Statement Precautionary Statement Each Label May IncludeSupplemental Information

14 Product Label Elements Example

15 Labels: Product Identifier and Supplier Information Product Identifier: The Name of the Product Supplier Information: Company Name Address Telephone Number

16 Labels: Signal Word Signal Word Quickly Communicates the Relative Severity of the Hazard Only 2 Signal Words Will Appear: DANGER (more severe hazard) WARNING (less severe hazard) Not all Labels Will Have a Signal Word Some chemicals are not hazardous enough to require that a signal word appear on the label

17 Labels: Pictograms There are 9 pictograms. Only 8 are regulated by OSHA Health Hazards Physical Hazards Environmental Hazards (Not regulated by OSHA)

18 Health Hazard Pictograms ! Skin corrosion/burns, eye damage corrosive to metals Acute toxicity, fatal or toxic Carcinogen, mutagenicity, Reproductive toxicity, respiratory sensitizer, target organ toxicity, aspiration toxicity Irritant, skin sensitizer, acute toxicity, narcotic effects, respiratory tract irritant, hazard to ozone layer

19 Physical Hazards Pictograms Flammables Self reactives Pyrophorics Self heating Emits flammable gas Organic peroxides Explosives Self reactives Organic peroxides Corrosive to Metals Gases under Pressure Oxidizer

20 English and Spanish Pictograms Posters Available 11x14

21 Labels: Hazard Statement "Hazard statement" means a statement assigned to a hazard class that describes the nature of the hazard(s) of a chemical, including, where appropriate, the hazard category (degree of hazard). There are specific hazard statements that must appear on the label based on the chemical hazard classification Examples: Flammable liquid and vapor Causes skin irritation May cause cancer

22 Hazard Class The nature of the physical or health hazards Examples: flammable solid, carcinogen, oral acute toxicity

23 Hazard Category Degree of Hazard 1 – 2 – 3 – 4 1 – Most Severe; 4 – Least Severe Example: Hazard Class: Flammable liquids Hazard Categories 1: Extremely flammable liquid and vapor 2: Highly flammable liquid and vapor 3: Flammable liquid and vapor 4: Combustible liquid

24 Label: Precautionary Statements "Precautionary statement" means a phrase that describes recommended measures that should be taken to minimize or prevent adverse effects resulting from exposure to a hazardous chemical, or improper storage or handling. Examples: Wear respiratory protection Wash with soap and water Store in a well ventilated place

25 Precautionary Statements Additional Information Precautionary Statements are not necessarily a mandate for employees to follow. The employer is to evaluate the precautionary statements to determine if these need to be followed by employees. This decision may be based on several factors: How chemical used Where it is used (ventilation concerns) How much of the chemical is used (quantity) Air sampling or testing results (permissible exposure limits) How long the chemical is used (time) Other considerations

26 Precautionary Statement Employer Evaluation Example A precautionary statement may state Wear respiratory protection Employees may not be required to wear a respirator based on the employers evaluation of the factors previously listed (how, where, how much, time)

27 Label: Supplemental / Other Information (Discretionary) Other information that may be included on the label: Physical state Color Hazards not otherwise classified Route of exposure Storage and disposal Hazard prevention and emergency response instructions

28 Current Label Example

29 New Label Example - DRAFT

30 Labels: Product In Use in the Workplace Workplace In-Use Labels Must Be Consistent with the HCS 2012 Product identifier and words, pictures, symbols, or combination thereof, which provide at least general information regarding the hazards of the chemicals May Use Signal Word, Hazard Statement, Pictograms, Precautionary Statement from Original Product Label May use written materials (e.g., signs, placards, etc.) in lieu of affixing labels to individual stationary process containers Employer can use GHS compliant labels (same as shipping)

31 Labels: In-Use Containers Secondary container labeling is the responsibility of the person moving the product into any other type of container, if: The chemistry is stored The chemistry is left unattended The chemistry leaves the persons direct control Label all chemical containers that will not be emptied before your shift is over.

32 Labels: In-Use Containers What about chemistry contained in places like buckets or scrubbers? These places may need labels, too. Cleaning equipment that accepts and mixes chemistry internally has a bottle that can be labeled. For other equipment, one solution is to use a packing list envelope, and adhere the label to the equipment. Or, laminate the label, punch a corner and use a ring to hang. Mixed solution should be removed from equipment before leaving.

33 Training Goals Understand the changes to the OSHA Hazard CommunicationStandard (Haz Com) What is GHS? Why was the GHS Developed? What are the Benefits of GHS? What are the Changes to Haz Comm Requirements with GHS? Who is Affected? When Do You Need To Be In Compliance? Review the New 2012 Hazard Communication New Labeling Requirements Overview of the Safety Data Sheets (SDS) format – 1 Overview of the Safety Data Sheets (SDS) format – 1 16 categories 16 categories

34 Safety Data Sheets Under the new Haz Com Standard, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are now called Safety Data Sheets (SDS). All SDSs will have a consistent 16-section format Flexibility of format removed Follows American National Standards Institute (ANSI) format Classified for health and physical hazards based on GHS criteria SDS Safety Data Sheet

35 Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) 1.Identification 2.Hazard(s) Identification 3.Composition/Ingredient Information 4.First-aid Measures 5.Fire-fighting Measures 6.Accidental Release Measures 7.Handling and Storage 8.Exposure Controls / Personal Protection 9.Physical and Chemical Properties 10.Stability and Reactivity 11.Toxicological Information 12.Ecological Information* 13.Disposal Consideration* 14.Transport Information* 15.Regulatory Information* 16.Other information including date of preparation of last revision 16 Part Format in a Specific Order * Not Regulated by OSHA

36 SDS Format 1. Identification Product Identifier Manufacturer or Distributor Name, Address, Phone Number Emergency Number Recommended Use Restrictions on Use

37 SDS Example

38 SDS Format 2. Hazard(s) Identification Class/Category Identifies the nature of the physical or health hazard, the severity of the hazard Signal Word DANGER or WARNING HNOC Hazards Not Otherwise Classified An adverse physical or health effect identified through evaluation of scientific evidence during the classification process that does not meet the specified criteria for the physical and health hazard classes above.

39 SDS Example

40 SDS Format 3. Composition/Information on Ingredients Chemical name, Common Name, CAS, Ingredient % or cut off limits 4. First-aid Measures Necessary measures, symptoms/effects What to do if an accident occurs 5. Fire-Fighting Measures What to do if the product catches on fire or is in a fire Suitable and unsuitable actions Hazards from fire

41 SDS Example

42 SDS Format 6. Accidental Release Measures Precautions, PPE, Emergency Procedures What to do in case the product spills 7. Handling and Storage Precautions for safe handling and storage, including any special handling or incompatibilities Where and what temperature to store the product 8. Exposure Control/Personal Protection PEL, TLV, NTP, IARC, Engineering Controls, PPE What type of protective equipment to wear

43 SDS Example

44 SDS Format 9. Physical and Chemical Properties Appearance, odor threshold, pH, flash point, LEL/UEL, vapor pressure/density What the product should normally look like 10. Stability and reactivity Possible hazardous reactions, incompatible materials Potential physical hazards 11. Toxicological information Routes of exposure, symptoms, acute/chronic

45 SDS Example

46 SDS Format 12. Ecological Information What can happen if the product is exposed to the environment 13. Disposal Consideration How to properly get rid of any excess product

47 SDS Example

48 SDS Format 14. Transport Information Explains how to properly ship the product

49 Transport Information Continued

50 SDS Format 15. Regulatory Information 16. Other Information Date of preparation/last revision

51 Important Deadlines Train Employees on New 2012 HCS Labels and SDSs Complete by December 1, 2013 Update SDS & Labels Manufacturers by June 1, 2015 Distributors Sell Through Until December 1, 2015 Update Workplace Labels & Facility Specific Written Program Complete by June 1, 2016

52 Training Summary Understand the changes to the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (Haz Com) Review the New 2012 Hazard Communication Overview of the Safety Data Sheets (SDS) format – 16 categories.

53 Federal OSHA Resources Regulatory HCS/HazCom 2012 Final Rule HCS Comparison: HazCom 1994 and FAQs Guidance OSHA Briefs Fact Sheet Haz Com Web Page: Guide to GHS:

54 Federal OSHA Quick Cards Quick Cards Labeling Safety Data Sheets Pictograms Free to Download In English & Spanish

55 Classroom Certificate You can receive a certificate for your attendance at this seminar worth 5 credits. After taking and passing the seminar quiz, you may qualify for 30 additional POZ Cleaning Education Credits.

56 Are there any questions?


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