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HazWOpER Refresher Dusting Off the Cobwebs, and Restoring Function to the Grey Matter, Since The Valley of the Drums and Creation of the HazWOpER Standard!

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Presentation on theme: "HazWOpER Refresher Dusting Off the Cobwebs, and Restoring Function to the Grey Matter, Since The Valley of the Drums and Creation of the HazWOpER Standard!"— Presentation transcript:

1 HazWOpER Refresher Dusting Off the Cobwebs, and Restoring Function to the Grey Matter, Since The Valley of the Drums and Creation of the HazWOpER Standard! Hazard Control

2 Hazard Control

3 Housekeeping Emergencies Phones Facility Layout Breaks Meals Participation Rules Hazard Control

4 Hazard Control To get our collective juices flowing (Its for your Own Good!)

5 Hazard Control Hazard Control: Before We Begin - Fundamentals Certain truths must be revealed & discussed before considering work on/near a hazwoper site

6 Hazard Control Hazard Control: Before We Begin - Fundamentals Philosophical 1) Work Shouldnt Hurt! 2) Accidents Dont Happen! 3) Everyone is Responsible!

7 Hazard Control Hazard Control: Before We Begin - Fundamentals What Takes Us Out of the Game? Falls Electrical Contact Struck-By Caught In or Between

8 Hazard Control Hazard Control: Before We Begin - Fundamentals Critical Control Apply the 7 Ps: Proper Prior Planning Prevents Pitifully Poor Performance

9 Hazard Control Hazard Control: Before We Begin - Fundamentals Regulatory General Duty Clause General Training Standard Topic-Specific Training

10 Hazard Control

11 First Responder Awareness Level First Responders (Awareness Level): workers likely to witness/discover hazardous substance release AND who trained to initiate emergency response sequence by notifying proper authorities of the release They take no further action beyond notifying the authorities of the release

12 First Responder Awareness Level ~8 hours of training Similar to OSHA Hazcom ( ) First Responders (Awareness Level) shall have sufficient training OR have had sufficient experience to objectively demonstrate competency

13 First Responder Operations Level First Responders (Operations Level) are workers who respond to releases/potential releases of hazardous substances as part of initial response to the site for purpose of protecting nearby persons, environment, property from effects of the release

14 First Responder Operations Level Trained to respond in defensive fashion without actually trying to stop the release Function: contain release from a safe distance, keep it from spreading, and to prevent exposures

15 First Responder Operations Level First Responders (Operational level) shall receive 8 hours of training OR have sufficient experience to objectively demonstrate competency Courses are hours with 24 being common

16 Hazmat Technician Level Hazmat Technicians respond to releases/potential releases to stop the release They assume a more aggressive role than Operations, approaching the point of release to plug, patch or otherwise stop the release

17 Hazmat Technician Level Technicians receive minimum 24 hours training equal to Operations level AND have competency in assigned tasks for each incident

18 Hazmat Specialist Level Hazmat Specialists respond with and provide support to Hazmat Technicians

19 Hazmat Specialist Level Duties parallel Hazmat Technician but require more directed or specific knowledge of various substances upon which they they may encounter

20 Hazmat Specialist Level Act as Site Liaison with Federal, State, Local, other government authorities regarding site activities Receive at least 24 hours of Technician-level training

21 Incident Command Level Incident Commanders assume control of the incident scene beyond the First Responder Awareness Level and shall receive at least 24 hours of training equal to the First Responder Operations Level. They also need competency in Incident Command systems & requirements

22 Hazard Control Hazard Control: INTRODUCTION Hazardous waste sites & environments pose S&H concerns which could result in serious injury/death

23 Hazard Control Hazard Control: INTRODUCTION Additional hazards created by Heavy equipment PPE reducing movement, hearing & vision Unpredictability of the site Other employers

24 Hazard Control Safety hazards that may exist at hazardous waste sites Holes or ditches Failed excavations Falling objects Sharp/jagged objects

25 Hazard Control Safety hazards that may exist at hazardous waste sites Slippery surfaces Steep grades Uneven terrain Unstable surfaces

26 Hazard Control What electrical hazards can pose danger to workers? Overhead electrical lines Fallen electrical wires Buried cables Electrical equipment (use low- voltage equipment with ground-fault interrupters and watertight, corrosion- resistant connecting cords)

27 Hazard Control Lighting Weather conditions Capacitors retain a charge What electrical hazards can pose danger to workers?

28 Hazard Control How do hazardous energy control (HEC) procedures protect workers? Before servicing & maintenance of equipment, OSHA requires control procedures to ensure Zero Energy State!

29 Hazard Control Lockout device (lock, chain, valve, etc.) Prevents flow of energy to prevent 1) unexpected start-up of equipment, and 2) unintended release of energy How do hazardous energy control (HEC) procedures protect workers?

30 Hazard Control Tagout Tag the power source Administrative control, not engineering control How do hazardous energy control (HEC) procedures protect workers?

31 Hazard Control Establish a program Utilize procedures for affixing appropriate lockout/tagout devices to power sources Otherwise disable equipment/machine to prevent unexpected start-up of equipment, or release of stored energy Requirements under HEC

32 Hazard Control HEC Process Program must include: Control Procedures Employee Training Skills Evaluation Periodic Procedure Evaluations To ensure uniformity & consistency

33 Hazard Control Effects of Noise Noise = Unwanted Sound Heavy equipment creates harmful noise levels

34 Hazard Control Noise-induced hearing loss Startled/Distracted Fatigue Hypertension Communication challenge Effects of Noise

35 Hazard Control The negative effect of noise exposure depends on Dose + Duration = Damage Risk Effects of Noise

36 Hazard Control Unit of Measure for Sound Sound intensity = decibels (dB) Examples Ticking watch = 20 dB (barely audible) Jet engine = 130 to 160 dB (painful)

37 Hazard Control Implement a Hearing Conservation Program? OSHA says A Hearing Conservation Program is required when noise levels 8 hour time-weighted average (TWA) sound level of 85dBA

38 Hazard Control Engineering & administrative controls must be used if workers are subject to noise >8-hour TWA of 90 dBA Implement a Hearing Conservation Program?

39 Hazard Control Minimize noise Noise monitoring Audiometric testing Engineering controls (e.g., design or retrofit; isolate exposure from workers; acoustical materials)

40 Hazard Control Administrative controls (rotate employees, operate offending equipment w/minimum staffing) PPE (plugs; caps; muffs) Training Minimize noise

41 Hazard Control Eye/Face Protection Reasonable probability of injury from Flying objects Glare Liquids Injurious radiation Combination of these hazards

42 Hazard Control Eye/Face Protection Reasonable probability of injury from Glasses – big chunks Goggles – small chunks Also mist, vapor, aerosol Shield – see goggles

43 Hazard Control When projectiles exist, workers must use eye protection that provides side protection Refer to ANSI Z87.1, et al Eye/Face Protection

44 Hazard Control Requirements of eye and face PPE? Must be Distinctly marked to facilitate identification of the manufacturer Capable of being disinfected and easily cleaned

45 Hazard Control Requirements for prescription glasses & contact lens wearers? Prescription lens wearers need Eye protection incorporating prescription in its design, or Eye protection worn over prescription lenses w/o disturbing proper position/integrity/function of either

46 Hazard Control The use of contact lenses should Be considered carefully Comply with the site-specific HASP* *HASP: Health & Safety Plan Requirements for prescription glasses & contact lens wearers?

47 Hazard Control Eye/face/body flushing When chemical hazards are present Eye wash stations - readily available & accessible Water/flushing solutions - to prevent particles from further injuring eyes

48 Hazard Control When is head protection required? Can An object strike the head? The head strike an object? The head contact an energized electrical conductor?

49 Hazard Control Head protection must meet all safety requirements (ANSI Z89.1) Hair must be restrained to prevent snagging on surrounding objects When is head protection required?

50 Hazard Control When is protective footwear required? Where potential hazards are present from Falling/rolling objects Objects may pierce the sole Chemical exposure Electrical shock Wet floors

51 Hazard Control Recommended types of footwear Safety toe shoes (hard toe) Treated shoes Rubber boots or plastic shoe covers Insulated shoes

52 Hazard Control Hand protection When there are hazards from Skin absorption Cuts, abrasions, punctures Chemical or thermal burns Harmful temperature extremes

53 Hazard Control Employers must require workers to use appropriate hand protection meeting all safety requirements Hand protection

54 Hazard Control Select gloves on the basis of Material being handled Hazard involved Hand protection

55 Hazard Control Norfoil laminate resists permeation and breakthrough by variety of toxic/hazardous chemicals Butyl provides highest resistance to gas/water vapors; frequently used for ketones (M.E.K., Acetone) and esters (Amyl Acetate, Ethyl Acetate) Hand protection

56 Hazard Control Viton is highly resistant to permeation by chlorinated & aromatic solvents Nitrile protects against wide variety of solvents, harsh chemicals, fats & petroleum products; provides excellent resistance to cuts, snags, punctures & abrasions Hand protection

57 Hazard Control Kevlar protects against cuts, slashes, and abrasion Stainless steel mesh protects against cuts and lacerations Hand protection

58 Hazard Control Check before using In good condition Free of holes, punctures, tears When removing Keep contaminated surface from contacting skin Hand protection

59 Hazard Control Consider Color of contaminant v. color of glove Remove chemical from glove (consider breakthrough time) When removing gloves Keep contaminated surface from contacting skin Hand protection

60 Dress for Success Level A – greatest level of skin, respiratory, eye protection Pos. press., full face SCBA, or pos. press. SAR w/escape SCBA NIOSH approved Totally-encapsulating chemical- protective suit Hazard Control

61 Dress for Success Level A – greatest level of skin, respiratory, eye protection Coveralls Long underwear Gloves, outer, chemical-resistant Gloves, inner, chemical-resistant Hazard Control

62 Dress for Success Level A – greatest level of skin, respiratory, eye protection Boots, chemical-resistant, hard toe and shank Hard hat (under suit) Hazard Control

63 Dress for Success Level A – greatest level of skin, respiratory, eye protection Disposable protective suit, gloves & boots if manufacturer permits, may be worn over fully-encapsulating suit Hazard Control

64 Dress for Success Level B - Highest level of respiratory protection necessary, but lesser level of skin protection needed Pos. press., full-face SCBA, or pos. press. SAR w/escape SCBA NIOSH approved Hazard Control

65 Dress for Success Level B - Highest level of respiratory protection necessary, but lesser level of skin protection needed Hooded chemical-resistant clothing (overalls & long-sleeved jacket; coveralls; one or two-piece chemical- splash suit; disposable chemical- resistant overalls). Hazard Control

66 Dress for Success Level B - Highest level of respiratory protection necessary, but lesser level of skin protection needed Coveralls Gloves, outer, chemical-resistant. Gloves, inner, chemical-resistant. Hazard Control

67 Dress for Success Level B - Highest level of respiratory protection necessary, but lesser level of skin protection needed Boots, outer, chemical-resistant steel toe and shank. Boot-covers, outer, chemical-resistant (disposable) Hazard Control

68 Dress for Success Level B - Highest level of respiratory protection necessary, but lesser level of skin protection needed Hard hat Face shield Hazard Control

69 Dress for Success Level C equipment Full-face or half-mask, APR NIOSH approved Hooded chemical-resistant clothing (overalls; two-piece chemical-splash suit; disposable chemical-resistant overalls) Hazard Control

70 Dress for Success Level C equipment Coveralls Gloves, outer, chemical-resistant. Gloves, inner, chemical-resistant. Boots (outer), chemical-resistant hard toe and shank Hazard Control

71 Dress for Success Level C equipment Boot covers, outer, chemical- resistant (disposable) Hard hat Escape mask Face shield Hazard Control

72 Dress for Success Level D - A work uniform affording minimal protection: used for nuisance contamination only Coveralls Gloves Boots/shoes, chemical-resistant hard toe and shank Hazard Control

73 Dress for Success Level D - A work uniform affording minimal protection: used for nuisance contamination only Boots, outer, chemical-resistant (disposable) Safety glasses or chemical splash goggles Hazard Control

74 Dress for Success Level D - A work uniform affording minimal protection: used for nuisance contamination only Hard hat Escape mask Face shield Hazard Control

75 Hazard Control : Update on Recent Developments

76 Hazard Control: UPDATE OSHA topics that will see regulatory action HEC Procedures Sanitation Cranes Hearing Working at Heights Equipment Operation Training Electrical Hazard Control

77 Hazard Control Review/ Q&A

78 1293 Airport Road, Beaver, WV Phone: (304) Fax: (304) With Gratitude to the IETTC for their Contributions to this Learning Experience International Environmental Technology and Training Center Working safely with hazardous materials Vincent J. Giblin, General President

79 Hazard Control Material was produced under a grant from the OSHA, U.S. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by OSHA or any department of the U.S. Government.

80 Hazard Control Exam

81 Hazard Control Course Evaluation

82 Hazard Control END COURSE


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