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Meeting Management Skills... Who Needs Them? Presented By Don Ensch, DTM, PID, AS.

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Presentation on theme: "Meeting Management Skills... Who Needs Them? Presented By Don Ensch, DTM, PID, AS."— Presentation transcript:

1 Meeting Management Skills... Who Needs Them? Presented By Don Ensch, DTM, PID, AS

2 2 If you cant be a sun be a star If you cant be a mountain, be a hill If you cant be a mountain, be a hill If you cant be a tree, be a bush If you cant be a tree, be a bush...but be the very best you can be!...but be the very best you can be! - Anonymous - Anonymous

3 3 I see too many areas of Platform Performing – yes, even on our Toastmaster Platforms – where there is too much slovenliness, too much slippage. As Toastmaster Leaders, as Platform Performers, we have to be the very best, because we are looked up to as examples of the zenith in Platform Performing. Excellence must be our Byline! - Don Ensch,

4 4 The Complete Platform Performer Reflects Excellence In 3 Areas: 1.Communications 2.Meeting Management 3.Personal Decorum For this session, we will consider Meeting Management and Personal Decorum.

5 5 Meeting Management There are four salient responsibilities to meeting management whether we are the Chairman or Speaker. They are: 1.Opening a Meeting 2.Introductions 3.Presenting / Receiving Recognition 4.Adjourning a Meeting. The amount of attention we pay to the detail that these responsibilities demand of us is the difference between excellence and mediocrity.

6 6 Opening A Meeting... There is a common misconception that the Sergeant at Arms that opens a meeting. This is not true! The Sergeant at Arms merely seats the delegation so the meeting can open on time. Do not recite a litany of please take your seats, the meeting will start in 5 minutes, or will everyone please be seated, clear the aisles so we can begin the meeting. These recitations produce ZILCH! It is the Presiding Officer who properly calls the meeting to order. BEGIN ON TIME... NO EXCEPTIONS!

7 7 Follow the Format... Sergeant at Arms assembles the membersSergeant at Arms assembles the members Sergeant at Arms presents the Presiding OfficerSergeant at Arms presents the Presiding Officer (Example) Ladies & gentlemen, please be seated. It is my privilege to present the Governor of District (#), (Name of District Governor or Presiding Officer). Sergeant at Arms takes one (1) step back, leads the applause, and greets the presiding officer (in this example, the DG) at the Speakers PositionSergeant at Arms takes one (1) step back, leads the applause, and greets the presiding officer (in this example, the DG) at the Speakers Position Presiding Officer takes their position and states, This meeting (e.g., The District Council Meeting) is in order. Please rise for the Invocation and Pledge.Presiding Officer takes their position and states, This meeting (e.g., The District Council Meeting) is in order. Please rise for the Invocation and Pledge.

8 8 Invocation and Pledge... A few Words of Wisdom: The people presenting the Invocation and the Pledge are to be on the platform when the meeting is called to order. Do not allow the Invocation and Pledge to be presented from the audience. An Invocation precedes the Pledge. A message of Inspiration follows the Pledge.

9 9 The Invocation Be Brief... Please! The Invocation is a prayer. Get the notion of offending someone by a prayer out of your mind. Whatever your faith, say your Invocation and be comfortable with it. Never apologize for your Invocation!

10 10 The Pledge of Allegiance The Pledge of Allegiance contains only 3 pauses! Recite the Pledge with Pride and Enthusiasm... with aliveness, and in a firm and deliberative voice. I Pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, One Nation under God, Indivisible, With Liberty and Justice for all.

11 11 Flag Position When displayed from a staff: The Flag is placed in advance (in front) of the audienceThe Flag is placed in advance (in front) of the audience The Flag is placed in a position of honor to the Speakers right as the speaker faces the audience.The Flag is placed in a position of honor to the Speakers right as the speaker faces the audience. The flag is placed without regard to platform or floor level.The flag is placed without regard to platform or floor level. When displayed horizontally or vertically against a wall... The Union is uppermost to the Flags own right, that is, to the observers left, and directly behind the Speaker.The Union is uppermost to the Flags own right, that is, to the observers left, and directly behind the Speaker.

12 12 Meeting Introductions The presiding officer appropriately makes the introductions (exception: the task for introductions – other than the emcee/host – has been assigned to another). There are two classes of introductions: 1.Member or Guest Introductions 2.Speaker Introductions

13 13 Introducing a Member or Guest: Who is not a Speaker... The function of the introduction is to create an aura of good fellowship. There is a simple formula we follow to insure proper introductions. 1.Position (i.e., President) 2.Affiliation (i.e., what organization the person belongs to or is affiliated with) 3.Name of the person

14 14 Introducing a Speaker The function of the introduction for a speaker is multifold. The introduction is designed to: 1.Build a bridge 2.Give Direction 3.Gives Credibility 4.Sets the Speaker apart

15 15 Introducing a Speaker Follow this simple 4-step formula for introducing a speaker and you will be successful every time. 1.Tell a little about the subject (2 or 3 sentences) 2.Tell a little about the speaker (2 to 4 sentences) 3.The speech/presentation Title 4.The Name of the Speaker.

16 16 Introducing a Speaker... The Speakers name is the last word of the introduction, indicating to the Speaker/Audience that the introduction is ended. The Speakers name is never mentioned in the body of the introduction.The Speakers name is the last word of the introduction, indicating to the Speaker/Audience that the introduction is ended. The Speakers name is never mentioned in the body of the introduction. When two or more Speakers are to be introduced, the Speaker of the lowest rank is introduced first, followed by the Speaker of the next highest rank, and so on.When two or more Speakers are to be introduced, the Speaker of the lowest rank is introduced first, followed by the Speaker of the next highest rank, and so on. The Speaker of the highest rank is introduced last. For example the order would be Speaker 1, CTM; Speaker 2, ATMB; Speaker 3, DTM.The Speaker of the highest rank is introduced last. For example the order would be Speaker 1, CTM; Speaker 2, ATMB; Speaker 3, DTM. An Introduction should be brief – lasting no more than 30 to 45 seconds.An Introduction should be brief – lasting no more than 30 to 45 seconds.

17 17 Mechanics of Speaker Introductions After announcing the Speakers name, step back one pace, at a 45 o angle from the Speakers position. Lead the applause and await the Speakers arrival at the Speakers Position. Greet the Speaker with a firm handshake and a warm smile.After announcing the Speakers name, step back one pace, at a 45 o angle from the Speakers position. Lead the applause and await the Speakers arrival at the Speakers Position. Greet the Speaker with a firm handshake and a warm smile. Wait for the Speakers acknowledgement (Mr. Chairman).Wait for the Speakers acknowledgement (Mr. Chairman). Take your seat near, but not obvious to, the Speakers Position.Take your seat near, but not obvious to, the Speakers Position.

18 18 Mechanics of Speaker Introductions At the conclusion of the Speakers address, arise and lead the applause.At the conclusion of the Speakers address, arise and lead the applause. As the applause fades, approach the Speakers Position (Speaker steps back one pace), and meet the Speaker in a final greeting with a firm handshake and a warm smile.As the applause fades, approach the Speakers Position (Speaker steps back one pace), and meet the Speaker in a final greeting with a firm handshake and a warm smile. With brevity, convey to the Speaker the sincere appreciation of the organization and audience for the Speakers contribution to the goals of the meeting.With brevity, convey to the Speaker the sincere appreciation of the organization and audience for the Speakers contribution to the goals of the meeting. Compliment the previous step with an appropriate presentation to the Speaker.Compliment the previous step with an appropriate presentation to the Speaker. Note: Inasmuch as practical, have the Speakers and the Chairman/emcee seated near the Speakers Position to reduce travel time to the Speakers Position.

19 19 Order of Introductions 1.Outside Guests (Non-Toastmasters): Highest to Lowest Rank 2.Outside Toastmasters: Highest to Lowest Rank. 3.Other Prominent Citizens: Highest to Lowest Rank. 4.Officers of the Host Toastmaster District: Highest to Lowest Rank.

20 20 Introduction Potpourri Introduce = Never Met Present = A Casual Acquaintance. A young person is introduced to an older person.A young person is introduced to an older person. A gentleman is introduced to a lady.A gentleman is introduced to a lady. A guest is introduced to a host/hostessA guest is introduced to a host/hostess A person without rank is introduced to a person with rank.A person without rank is introduced to a person with rank. A gentleman never offers his hand first in greeting a lady, unless he is the Host or of higher rank.A gentleman never offers his hand first in greeting a lady, unless he is the Host or of higher rank. A lady rises only if she is introduced to someone of higher rank, to an older person, or to her Host/Hostess.A lady rises only if she is introduced to someone of higher rank, to an older person, or to her Host/Hostess. A gentleman always rises when he is introduced.A gentleman always rises when he is introduced.

21 21 Presenting/Receiving Recognition Recognition is a vital ingredient in Successful Platform Management! It is characterized by... Dignity – Sincerity – Finesse Recognition is used to: Compliment a Speakers Performance/SkillCompliment a Speakers Performance/Skill Acknowledge the Speakers contribution to the ProgramAcknowledge the Speakers contribution to the Program Manifest appreciation.Manifest appreciation.

22 22 The Formula for Presenting & Receiving Recognition Presenting RecognitionPresenting Recognition State Accomplishment State Accomplishment Describe the recognition (object) Describe the recognition (object) Name the Recipient. Name the Recipient. Receiving RecognitionReceiving Recognition Accept the Recognition Accept the Recognition Acknowledge Acknowledge Express Appreciation Express Appreciation

23 23 The Adjournment Process The adjournment of the meeting – like the opening – is done by the Presiding Officer, and it should be brief, clean, crisp, and ON TIME! Only the Presiding Officer declares the meeting adjourned. As Chairman, do not let the ending of a meeting drag on: adjourn promptly at the time set by the Program/Agenda.

24 24 The Adjournment Process For the Good of the Order... The next to last item on the program is The Good of the Order. It includes announcements, credits, and recognition (if any). Ask once – and once only – Is there anything for the Good of the Order? If no one rises, or only one member rises to speak and after they are finished, briefly scan the audience. If no one else rises to speak, and provided there are no credits or recognition to be given, then clearly and strongly declare, This meeting is adjourned! Note: If credits or recognition are to be given, they follow the announcements. After credits and recognition, the last item on the Program/Agenda is ADJOURN! At this point, promptly adjourn the meeting and immediately leave the Chairmans position. The vacant chair clearly indicates to all that the proceedings are indeed concluded. In other words, there is no meeting in progress.

25 25 The Adjournment Sequence 1.Is there anything for the Good of the Order? 2.Present Credits and Recognition 3.Adjourn!

26 26 On Personal Decorum... Attire Attire Neatness Neatness Posture Posture Expression Voice Manners Our personal decorum is a reflection, in part, of our meeting management skills and how seriously we approach our responsibilities. Our personal decorum is reflected through our:

27 27 Attire... The attire should be proper and fitting for the occasion.The attire should be proper and fitting for the occasion. Avoid flashy, mod, and distractive styles on the platform.Avoid flashy, mod, and distractive styles on the platform. Men: White, pressed, dress shirt, tie and dark suit.Men: White, pressed, dress shirt, tie and dark suit. Women: Conservative dress with long sleeves, or a dress suit.Women: Conservative dress with long sleeves, or a dress suit.

28 28 Neatness Counts! Be squeaky clean – SPARKLE!Be squeaky clean – SPARKLE! Make sure you are presenting the best image you can. Shirts and suits should be spotless, clean, and professionally pressed.Make sure you are presenting the best image you can. Shirts and suits should be spotless, clean, and professionally pressed. Shoes should be shined (no scuff marks)Shoes should be shined (no scuff marks) Hair combedHair combed Men, being clean shaven is preferred.Men, being clean shaven is preferred. Fingernails should be clean and trimmed.Fingernails should be clean and trimmed. Eliminate distractive accruements from your clothingEliminate distractive accruements from your clothing Have that fresh, alive look! When I look good, I feel good about myself and I do well. It does not take wealth to look clean and neat – just good effort and discipline. –Don

29 29 Posture... Do You Measure Up? Good posture reassures my listeners... poor posture turns them off. On the platform: Stand Erect (feet comfortably placed about 8 apart)Stand Erect (feet comfortably placed about 8 apart) Hands at your side (except to gesture)Hands at your side (except to gesture) An alive, alert, yet relaxed stanceAn alive, alert, yet relaxed stance Do not fuss with clothes, mike, gavel, glasses, etc.Do not fuss with clothes, mike, gavel, glasses, etc.

30 30 Expression Our expressions are the windows of our heart and mind, and they reveal our true tones and tints. Always strive to have... A warm, friendly smileA warm, friendly smile An enthusiastic demeanorAn enthusiastic demeanor A look of confidenceA look of confidence These will always win your audience

31 31 Voice Our Voice conveys our feelings, attitudes, and emotions. Thus, we strive for a... Firm Voice – To show Strength Firm Voice – To show Strength Assured Voice – To show Confidence Assured Voice – To show Confidence Warm Voice – To show Friendliness Warm Voice – To show Friendliness Pleasing Voice – To win the Audience Pleasing Voice – To win the Audience

32 32 Manners: Our Code of Social Conduct By our manners... We show respect/consideration for others We show respect/consideration for others We show respect for each others viewpoints & feelings We show respect for each others viewpoints & feelings We do not demean or belittle others We do not demean or belittle others We are helpful to others We are helpful to others We reflect integrity and refinement. We reflect integrity and refinement. Our good manners draw others to us and convey our openness and fairness in dealing with them. Good manners are the personification of the Golden Rule... they are our passport around the world.

33 33 Epilogue We bring time, effort, and concern to our platform endeavors, and our personal decorum on the platform determines – to a great extent – the measure of success we will enjoy. Strive always for the highest level of personal decorum – we owe it to our audience. Only if Excellence Is My Byline will I become the super star on the platform. Everything we do in life is a self-portrait... SIGN IT WITH EXCELLENCE!


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