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Cyber Bullying and Unkind Online Language

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1 Cyber Bullying and Unkind Online Language
The Power of Words Cyber Bullying and Unkind Online Language This curriculum is adapted from Common Sense Media, Digital Literacy and Citizenship in a Connected Culture © 2012 VUSD Grade 4

2 Objectives: Students will
Compare and contrast digital and face-to- face communication Empathize with those who have received mean and hurtful digital messages Judge what it means to cross the line from harmless to harmful communication online Generate solutions for dealing with cyber bullying Objectives In our lesson today we will (Click) to animate each objective … Compare and contrast digital and face-to-face communication; Learn that digital communication can be used to hurt people; learn about the effects of that hurtful communication; we will have the opportunity to empathize with some recipients of hurtful messages; Optional - Vocabulary: click on the word “empathize” to be taken to the vocabulary slide for this term; click on the return arrow to come back to this slide Learn how to decide when communication is harmless and when it is harmful or hurtful; we will learn what it means to “cross the line” and how to avoid it; Think of effective ways for dealing with cyber bullying; Optional - Vocabulary: click on the words “cyber bullying” to be taken to the vocabulary slide for this term; also click from there on the vocab word “anonymous”; click on the return arrow to come back to this slide

3 Online Communication How do you use digital media? Cell phones
Texting, instant messaging Skype or video chat Online web sites Social Media Online gaming Connecting to Prior knowledge – Building Background: Communicating online, or communicating digitally, means using any form of communication that is powered by technology and is not written or printed on paper. Telegraph and telephones were some of the first forms of digital communication. Think of all of the different forms of digital communication that are available to use today. Rally Robin with your partner to name as many different forms of digital media that you can think of – you have (10-15) seconds. Check with students to see what they have named. These are some commonly-used forms and tools for digital communication: (Click to bring in one at a time) - Cell phones – voice conversations usually between 2 people - Texting, Instant messaging – between 2 people, or to a group of people - Skype – 2 or more people at a given time - Online web sites – opportunities to reply to posts, respond with your own ideas – much broader time frame – a very large group may participate at different times - Social Media – such as Facebook – potentially a very large group of people – not limited in time - Online gaming – potentially very large group at a given time but with extended conversation/comments over a broad time span

4 Online Communication Timed Pair Share
What are some advantages of online communication? immediate wide audience What are some limitations or disadvantages of online communication? body language, inflection anonymous Input: (Click) Think: What are some of the advantages, the good things, that we can appreciate about online communication? What does digital communication allow us to do that face-to-face communication does not allow us to do? Optional - Vocabulary: click on the word “advantages” to be taken to the vocabulary slide for this term; click on the return arrow to come back to this slide Timed-Pair-Share: A’s - You have 30 seconds to explain to your shoulder partner what you think is one advantage of digital or online communication. Give an example from your own experience if you can B’s – now you have 30 seconds to explain to your shoulder partner what you think is another advantage of digital or online communication. Check for student responses (Click) One of the advantages that we can all appreciate is the speed of the communication. A letter can take days to arrive at its destination, but an is almost instantaneous. (Click) Another advantage is the wide audience that can be reached. If I am going to my home town to visit next weekend, I can call each of my home town friends and family individually, or I can send an to all of them at once. Or I can post on Facebook that I am coming and all of my friends, if they use Facebook, can see that I will be in town. One person can communicate with many at one time! (Click) There are some disadvantages to online communication, too. There are some limitations to digital communication. Optional - Vocabulary: click on the word “disadvantages” to be taken to the vocabulary slide for this term; click on the return arrow to come back to this slide Can you think of some disadvantages? (Click) Often when we talk to someone in person we also notice body language and facial expressions to add meaning to what is being said. When we communicate digitally we do not see any body language. This is a disadvantage. When we talk to someone we listen to their voice to give added meaning to their words; their tone of voice, or their voice inflection – how their voice goes up or down – gives us a better understanding of what they are really saying. But in texts, s, or online posts, we don’t hear a voice. This is also a disadvantage. (Click) Another disadvantage is that some texts and posts can be sent anonymously – we can’t be sure who sent them or who is doing the posting. You have learned in previous lessons that often it is best NOT to use your real name. But today we will see how some people misuse that feature of digital communication. Continued Next Page . . .

5 Words Can Hurt The experience of Rani and Aruna Input, cont:
Distribute “Words Can Hurt Student Handout”.

6 “In their shoes …” Talking Chips Timed Pair Share Structured Practice:
Put yourselves in Rani and Aruna’s shoes. [Read Directions at top of Student Handout page]. We don’t know what the game is or how they are playing – but here come the messages: (Click) to animate each message; if you read it aloud, do so without inflection, facial expression or body language. (Click) Have each student answer the questions and then have them share their responses with their group using Talking Chips. Use your pencils as Talking Chips. Discuss the first question, “How do you think Rani and Aruna feel …?” Use your talking chips again. Share how you think you would feel if you received messages like these?” Now use your talking chips to discuss why you think people send messages like these to people they don’t know. Group Discussion: Use Kagan Selector Tools or Equity Sticks – follow-up to Question 1: What was one thing mentioned in your group regarding how Rani and Aruna feel when they see those messages? Continue discussion with Questions 2 and 3. Look for responses that show empathy for Rani and Aruna and acknowledge that the messages are mean and hurtful and should be stopped. Read with students the “A Matter of Ethics” section on the handout. Allow time for students’ written response on Handout. (Click) Timed-Pair Share: responses to “Ethics” section of Handout. Ask for volunteer responses to share with class. Talking Chips Timed Pair Share Continued Next Page . . .

7 “In their shoes …” continued
Talking Chips “A Matter of Ethics” Structured Practice cont: (Click) Have each student answer questions 1-3 on the student handout and then have them share their responses with their table group using Talking Chips. Use your pencils as Talking Chips. Discuss the first question, “How do you think Rani and Aruna feel …?” Use your talking chips again. Share how you think you would feel if you received messages like these?” Now use your talking chips to discuss why you think people send messages like these to people they don’t know. Group Discussion: Use Kagan Selector Tools or Equity Sticks – follow-up to Question 1: What was one thing mentioned in your group regarding how Rani and Aruna feel when they see those messages? Continue discussion with Questions 2 and 3. Look for responses that show empathy for Rani and Aruna and acknowledge that the messages are mean and hurtful and should be stopped. (Click) Read with students the “A Matter of Ethics” section on the handout. Allow time for students’ written response on Handout. (Click) Timed Pair Share: responses to “Ethics” section of Handout. Ask for volunteer responses to share with class. Timed Pair Share

8 “Is there a difference…?”
Structured Practice, cont: When you think about this sentence alone, is there a difference in seeing this in a text and hearing it in person? When you read the text, what do you not see or hear? (Allow for student responses) You do not see or hear … Tone of voice Facial expression Body language (Click) Take a good look at this picture. If a person in this group said, “You’re ruining the game!” what would you think? (Allow for student responses) A player might respond that way if he/she had an opponent who kept winning at every play and left the other players with “no chance” to score or win! In this case, would the comment be mean or hurtful? No … maybe playful; maybe just a bit “whiney”. Would the comment be anonymous? No – we can see everyone involved, and we can see they are smiling. We can see if anyone is hurt and offended, and the situation can be fixed right away. The anonymous and immediate nature of online communication makes it extra important to check our words before we say or write them, and to think ahead and consider how those words might be understood or misunderstood.

9 Crossing the Line I like your new haircut. You are really ugly.
O. K. - Harmless I’m having a party and you are not invited. I like your new haircut. Why is it taking you so long to finish it? Did you finish your homework? You are really ugly. Over the Line - Harmful You are an idiot. You are such a freak. Are you going to the game? Structured Practice, cont: Unfortunately, some people forget to think ahead, and they use words carelessly. And some people, it is sad to say, use the immediate and anonymous nature of online communication to send mean and hurtful messages on purpose! Some people really do try to be hurtful and cruel with their words. Let’s look at some messages and decide if they are OK or harmless, or if they are “over the line” and hurtful. (Click) to animate each of the comments, ask class to use “thumbs up” and “thumbs down” to indicate an “OK” statement and an “over the line” statement; then click again to move the comment to its place; allow for brief discussion as needed, and allow for disagreement. “You are an idiot” - deliberately hurtful “I’m having a party …” - excluding, hurtful “I like your new haircut” - complimentary “You are really ugly” - hurtful “Did you finish your homework?” - question “Why is it taking …?” - it depends – could be making fun of a student who works slower, or could be curious about the assignment (for someone who hasn’t started yet) – is it extra long, harder than usual, etc? “You are a freak” - hurtful “Are you going to the game?” - question People who purposefully (on purpose) make mean and hurtful comments to you in person or behind your back are bullies. People who purposefully make or write hurtful comments, texts, posts, or s using digital media are cyber bullies.

10 How to Handle a CyberBully
In groups of Brainstorm – what to do? Write all ideas Star top three Whole class share Brainstorm – Problem Solving: Receiving mean or hurtful messages from a cyber bully can be very troubling. You may become upset. You may become angry. What should you do? How should you react when you receive mean or hurtful messages from a cyber bully? Think Time (Click) Choose a recorder for each table group of 4. (Click) Ask table groups to brainstorm possible things to do or actions to take when receiving a mean or hurtful message via digital media, whether the message is anonymous or not. Allow time for brainstorming. (Click) The recorder should briefly note each possible action. Allow time for this part of the activity Ask students, in their groups, to come to consensus on their “top three” recommended things to do (three actions to take) from their list. The recorder for each table will “star” their top three responses. (Click) After sufficient time has been given, call on recorders (equity sticks) to each read one possible action (trying not to repeat actions) and Teacher - record them on the board (or chart paper or under doc camera) until all have been given. Ask for any other ideas – record all without judging the appropriateness. As a whole class, assess all suggestions based upon whether each action is: fair to all concerned and respectful to the rights of others Indicate all appropriate actions (fair and respectful) on board/chart paper/under doc camera. Continued Next Page . . .

11 What to do . . . Cool down Keep a copy of the communication
Ignore the bully; block the bully Find help or tell a trusted adult Input: You have come up with, and we have agreed on, some solutions or actions to take when dealing with cyber bullying; these are good suggestions. Cyber bullying is a serious problem and we have to deal with it seriously. It can be very upsetting and sometimes scary to receive mean, hurtful messages. Remember, that is what cyber bullies are trying to do – make you scared or hurt your feelings and make you feel bad. According to the information that researchers have found, here are four responses that work well when you receive messages (tweets, texts, calls, s, or posts) from a cyber bully: (Click) to bring in each action to take Cool down – receiving a hurtful or mean message can really upset you or make you angry; responding while you are upset or angry can make things worse; avoid the temptation to write a mean message back to the sender. Instead, cool down, take a deep breath, count to 10, or do whatever it takes to give yourself time to think clearly about the situation. Keep a copy of the communication – do not immediately delete it; you need to be able to show how you were treated by the bully. Ignore the bully and his/her communication; keep a copy, but don’t answer back, do not respond; bullies typically are looking for attention – don’t give them the attention they are seeking. Ignoring might mean walking away, or closing the game or even shutting down the computer (after saving a copy of the message); ignoring might mean ending the phone call or closing the chat session; if you are not sure how to save the communication, ask your teacher, parent, or an adult. Another way to permanently ignore the bully is to “block” future communications with him/her – this can be done with most , chat, and social networking programs; if you are not sure how to do this, check with your parent/teacher/another adult. Tell a parent, trusted adult, teacher or friend; you should not have to deal with a cyber bullying situation alone. The person you tell should be someone who wants to hear what you have to say and will help you work on a solution. Adults are especially good because they often have the power to influence the situation and can give you advice about what to do. Continued Next Page . . .

12 Let’s Check . . . Alicia receives a text message from her friend that says, “I am going skating with Brittany and Maria and you are not invited.” How might Alicia feel? (Select all possible answers) a. hurt c. angry b. excited d. unpopular Guided Practice / Check for Understanding (Click) Read through the scenario; (Click) How might Alicia Feel? (Click) check for understanding using responses from students (white boards, thumbs-up, etc). (Click) Validate the idea that being excluded is a form of bullying because it is often done with the intent of making others feel bad, unworthy, etc.

13 Let’s Check . . . Miguel was playing an online game when he received this message: “You are a stupid player, quit the game dork!” Miguel immediately quit the game and turned off his computer. According to the researchers, what else could Miguel have done? Kept a copy of the message, told his parent or other adult. Guided Practice / Check for Understanding (Click) to animate the first three bullets as you read through the scenario; Use equity sticks to elicit responses to the question – “What else could Miguel have done?” (Click) Revisit the 4 recommendations from researchers if needed: Cool down Keep a record on the communication Ignore the cyber bully; do not respond Tell an adult

14 Let’s Check . . . Andres gave a report in class on the planet Saturn. Later that afternoon he received a text from a classmate that said, “Nice report, nerd!” Andres wasn’t sure how to react. He is at a disadvantage in interpreting this message. Why? No tone of voice, no facial expression, no body language Guided Practice / Check for Understanding (Click) to animate the first two bullets as you read through the scenario; (Click) Timed/Pair Share: Shoulder partners share responses to the prompt - “Why is Andres at a disadvantage?” Use equity sticks to elicit responses to the question – “Why is Andres at a disadvantage?” (Click)

15 Did We Meet Our Objectives?
Explore the similarities and differences between digital and face-to-face communication? Empathize with those who have received mean and hurtful digital messages? Judge what it means to cross the line from harmless to harmful communication online? Generate solutions for dealing with cyber bullying? Re-Visit the Objectives (Click) through the animated sequence to revisit objectives.

16 Words are Powerful Use with Caution Summary Words are Powerful
Once they are out of our mouths, they can’t really be taken back; once they are sent digitally, they definitely can not be taken back and they become a part of the digital trail that you leave behind you. Use your words with caution.

17 empathize (verb) to understand and share the feelings, emotions, or experiences of another person; to put yourself “in another person’s shoes” Vocabulary Possible sentence: My dog ran away last year, so I can empathize with Mindy over her lost cat. Possible sentence: My dog ran away last year, so I can empathize with Mindy over her lost cat.

18 cyber bullying (noun) using electronic or digital media to send mean-spirited messages to or about a person; cyber bullying is often done anonymously Vocabulary Possible sentence: She received several mean texts; she was the victim of cyber bullying. Possible sentence: She received several mean texts; she was the victim of cyber bullying.

19 anonymous (adjective)
without revealing an identity or authorship; no signature or name, or use of a different name so others won’t know who you are Vocabulary Possible sentence: The PTA received an anonymous donation. Possible sentence: The PTA received an anonymous donation.

20 advantage (noun) a benefit or a gain; a better position or circumstance; positive factors Vocabulary Possible sentence: Tall students have an advantage when playing basketball. Possible sentence: Tall students have an advantage when playing basketball.

21 disadvantage (noun) An unfavorable position or condition; factors that make achievement difficult; negative factors Vocabulary Possible sentence: Tortoise, because of his slowness, was at a disadvantage in his race against hare. Possible sentence: Tortoise, because of his slowness, was at a disadvantage in his race against hare.

22 anonymous (adjective)
without revealing an identity or authorship; no signature or name, or use of a different name so others won’t know who you are Vocabulary Possible sentence: The PTA received an anonymous donation. Possible sentence: The PTA received an anonymous donation.


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