Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

John Amson Capitman, PhD. Nickerson Professor of Health Policy Central Valley Health Policy Institute California State University, Fresno.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "John Amson Capitman, PhD. Nickerson Professor of Health Policy Central Valley Health Policy Institute California State University, Fresno."— Presentation transcript:

1 John Amson Capitman, PhD. Nickerson Professor of Health Policy Central Valley Health Policy Institute California State University, Fresno

2 Day 2: Review of worksheets from Day 1 Anticipating Long-term Care Needs Caring for Caregivers Living Will: the 5 wishes Long-term Care Insurance

3 D-I-Y Obituary Anything learned or relearned Any new questions Recipes for a good death--- medical consensus Anything learned or relearned Any new questions

4 Compression of Mortality? Morbidity? Because of epidemiological transition, more people live to old age, and more people live to the natural limits of human life ===Smaller part of life course associated with most deaths====Compression of Mortality BUT is there a compression of morbidity? Later onset of disability?

5 Lifetime Risk of Disability Risk of current disability increases with age: for a person aged 85 (35 %) is more than 7x greater than for a person aged 74 (4.6 %). The lifetime risk of developing a disability in at least two primary activities of daily living for at least 3 months or becoming cognitively impaired is 44% for males and 72% for females at age 65. Women face a 64% higher risk than do men. Lifetime risk of developing a disability declines slightly with age.

6

7 1. Disability insurance and long term care (LTC) insurance cover the same things. 2. The average lifetime chance of needing long term care for an individual 65 years or older is more than 40%. 3. People have to spend all or almost all of their assets to get Medicaid benefits. 4. Medicare is not the primary funding source for most seniors long term care costs. 5. Most long term care is provided in a nursing home. 6. Medicaid covers long term care services received at home. 7. Nursing home expenses for Alzheimers Disease patients are covered by Medicare. 8. The average length of stay in a nursing home is more than four years. 9. Nearly 40% of the long term care population is under the age of On average, a one-year stay in a nursing home costs about $30,000.

8 Over 7 million Americans provide 120 million hours of informal care to approximately 4.2 million severely disabled elders each and every week. About 38 million adult caregivers (age 18 or older) provided unpaid care for ADL/IADL Caregivers provided an average of 21 hours of care per week, or 1,080 hours per year. An estimated $350 billion/year to replace informal caregiving Out-of-pocket, lost wages, lost retirement income, lost productivity, costs associated with health effects

9 If you are run down, tiring more than usual, will you be able to provide good care? If you have a cold or the flu, will your loved one catch it from you? If you become depressed will you be able to make good decisions, will life become unbearable? If you are not well, who will fill your shoes, whether temporarily or permanently? BASIC TIPS Take a daily vitamin supplement Get exercise make it a priority for both your mental and physical well- being. Get regular check-ups and do not ignore possible symptoms of ill health. Take a break from caregiving – respite time is crucial. Watch for signs of depression – more information Stay involved in hobbies Laugh with a friend

10 Educate yourself about the disease your family member is facing and how it may affect his or her behavior, pain level, etc. Find sources of help for caregiver tasks. Contact family, friends, neighbors, church/synagogue, workplace, Area Agency on Aging or other organizations. Keep looking! Protect your personal time for something you enjoy or something you need to get done. Try to find time for exercise, eating well and sleeping enough. Watch out for symptoms of depression (such as crying more, sleeping more or less than usual, increased or decreased appetite or lack of interest in usual activities). Notify your doctor if symptoms of depression are present. Consider how you will feel and what you will do after the caregiving ends.

11 In-home supports (home health, homemaker, independent living aide) Out-of-home, community care (adult day care, outpatient rehabilitation) Supportive/Transitional Housing Board and care Assisted living CCRC Nursing homes

12 Figure up to $150k in long-term care costs if needed for average time/mix of in-home and facility 3 primary options 1. Save moneydedicated savings 2. Prepare to qualify for MediCal 3. Purchase LTC Insurance


Download ppt "John Amson Capitman, PhD. Nickerson Professor of Health Policy Central Valley Health Policy Institute California State University, Fresno."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google