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Grant Opportunities to Support Additional Time for Learning Grant Information Session April 1, 2014 9:30 – 2:30 PM Tower Hill Botanic Gardens, Boylston.

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Presentation on theme: "Grant Opportunities to Support Additional Time for Learning Grant Information Session April 1, 2014 9:30 – 2:30 PM Tower Hill Botanic Gardens, Boylston."— Presentation transcript:

1 Grant Opportunities to Support Additional Time for Learning Grant Information Session April 1, :30 – 2:30 PM Tower Hill Botanic Gardens, Boylston Presented by: Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Staff (slides modified slightly for web posting) Time alone guarantees nothing … but with it, all else is possible. --Massachusetts Commission on Time and Learning, 1995

2 Agenda Welcome General Grants Overview More Time: OST and ELT 21 st CCLC and ELT Principles Promising Practices Program Design Partners Lunch Questions? Promising Practices Teacher Collaboration and Professional Development Scheduling Sustainability Evaluation, Questions and Wrap-up Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 2

3 The Departments Goal To prepare all students for success after high school Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 3

4 Common Purpose FC 225-C Expanded Learning Time Grant FC 225-C Expanded Learning Time Grant To support the planning and implementation of additional time for learning for students in grades K-12, that helps to close proficiency gaps, increase student engagement, and support college and career readiness and success. FC 647-B1 21 st Century Community Learning Centers – Supporting ELT and OST FC 647-B1 21 st Century Community Learning Centers – Supporting ELT and OST Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 4

5 ELT Expanded Learning Time ELT Expanded Learning Time A longer school- day/year for all students. OST Out-of-School Time OST Out-of-School Time Programming that is for targeted students and takes place outside of the regular school day/year. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 5 Different Models for Adding Time

6 FC 225-C Expanded Learning Time Grant FC 225-C Expanded Learning Time Grant Add at least 300 hours for all students as part of their required school day/year.* *Building on a traditional hour day for 180 days, this translates to a total of: 1,380 hours for elementary schools 1,470 hours for middle/high schools Add at least 300 hours for all students as part of their required school day/year.* *Building on a traditional hour day for 180 days, this translates to a total of: 1,380 hours for elementary schools 1,470 hours for middle/high schools FC 647-B1 21 st Century Community Learning Centers – Supporting ELT and OST FC 647-B1 21 st Century Community Learning Centers – Supporting ELT and OST Model 1 (ELT): Add at least 180 hours for all students as part of their required school day/year. (Above the FY13 or FY14 hours.) Model 2 (OST): Offer 448 hours of out-of-school time programming (school year and summer) for a targeted group of students. Model 1 (ELT): Add at least 180 hours for all students as part of their required school day/year. (Above the FY13 or FY14 hours.) Model 2 (OST): Offer 448 hours of out-of-school time programming (school year and summer) for a targeted group of students. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 6

7 Common Priorities All applicants will implement activities that use more time for: Engaging teaching and learning in core subject areas Creative and innovative enrichment (in all developmental domains) Educators/staff to collaborate and plan Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 7

8 Common Priorities (continued) All applicants will implement activities that use more time for: Stronger community and family partnerships Sustainable models ELT and/or OST Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 8

9 Competitive Priorities For BOTH grants, competitive priority will be given to applicants that propose: To serve youth in schools/communities with higher percentages of families with low income. To implement more time in a school or in partnership with a school designated as Level 3, 4, or 5. Targeted strategies to support early literacy efforts and/or successful transition into High School. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 9

10 Competitive Priorities Propose a year-round school model Propose the use of blended learning strategies. Propose to add time at a middle school. FC 225-C Only Requesting < $1,300 per pupil from this grant and propose a plan to support other anticipated costs of ELT. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 10 and FC 647-B1 – ELT Only FC 225-C FC 647-B1 – OST Only Districts that have not received 21 st CCLC funding within at least the past three years (FY12-FY14).

11 Common Required Program Information (Part III) District/Lead Applicant Demonstrate alignment to district goals/priorities Describe support for implementation and sustainability Submit the SAME district summary. (For both 225-C and 647-B1) Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 11

12 Common Required Program Information (Part III) School/Site Describe needs to be addressed with more time Describe rationale for chosen model Provide proposed schedules For each proposed school/site, submit a School/Site Summary (section IV). Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 12

13 Common Required Program Information (Part III) School/Site (continued) Describe proposed activities, made possible with more time*, related to : Engaging Academics Professional Development/Collaboration Enrichment Partnerships *and in particular, made possible with this grant Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 13

14 Eligibility* FC 225-C Expanded Learning Time Grant FC 225-C Expanded Learning Time Grant Massachusetts school districts. FC 647-B1 21 st Century Community Learning Centers – Supporting ELT and OST FC 647-B1 21 st Century Community Learning Centers – Supporting ELT and OST School districts, cities and towns, community- based organizations (CBOs), other public or private entities, or a consortium of two (2) or more of such agencies, organizations, or entities. Eligible applicants must also either: Primarily serve students in schools designated as Title I School-Wide programs; and/or Serve students in schools with 20% or more low- income families Applicants from agencies/organizations that are not a school district, city, or town must demonstrate capacity to administer the program. School districts, cities and towns, community- based organizations (CBOs), other public or private entities, or a consortium of two (2) or more of such agencies, organizations, or entities. Eligible applicants must also either: Primarily serve students in schools designated as Title I School-Wide programs; and/or Serve students in schools with 20% or more low- income families Applicants from agencies/organizations that are not a school district, city, or town must demonstrate capacity to administer the program. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 14 *see the RFP for additional eligibility parameters

15 # of Schools/Sites The same school/site may not be included in applications for both FC 225-C and FC 647-B1. Model 1 (ELT): Up to TWO schools Model 2 (OST): ONE school/site Model 1 (ELT): Up to TWO schools Model 2 (OST): ONE school/site Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 15

16 Funding* FC 225-C Expanded Learning Time Grant FC 225-C Expanded Learning Time Grant Maximum $1,300 per pupil enrolled. NOTE: Strong competitive priority will be given to applicants that request less than $1,300 per pupil in grant funding; and propose a plan to support other anticipated costs associated with implementing ELT that will not be covered using grant funds. FC 647-B1 21 st Century Community Learning Centers – Supporting ELT and OST FC 647-B1 21 st Century Community Learning Centers – Supporting ELT and OST Model 1 (ELT): Maximum $500 per pupil enrolled. Model 2 (OST): Maximum $175,000 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 16 * The requested amount should be appropriate and reasonable for the size and scope of the proposed activities.

17 Fund Use For BOTH grants, funds may support: Salaries Stipends Contracts Instructional materials, and Other expenses associated with implementing additional time. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 17

18 Fund Use (FC 647-B1 only) Funds must supplement not supplant currently funded costs, which would otherwise be funded It is expected that applicants will use the funds from this grant to support enhanced or new services for students. For Model 1 (ELT), must identify specific components of the grant, aligned to the Elements for Content Rich 21 st CCLC Programming, to be supported with this grant. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 18

19 Questions?

20 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 20 OVERVIEW

21 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 21 "Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand. That is the Mantra of the Massachusetts 21 st Century Community Learning Centers Program

22 Goals of the Massachusetts 21 st Century Community Learning Center Programs Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 22 Coordination between core content instructional time and academic enrichments and supports, with shared learning goals, teaching, and support strategies. A school and community-based infrastructure with established procedures that improve student outcomes. Development of College and Career Readiness Skills (includes analytic reasoning, critical-thinking, problem-solving ) Development of a tiered system of support. A system that evaluates program effectiveness through data collection and analysis

23 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 23 (MEANINGFUL) We need to be able to support students in learning how to learn. In the era of Common Core State Standards, it's not enough for students to show their work, they need to understand why they are doing the things they are doing and be able to not just explain why but justify it. To be intentional is to act purposefully, with a goal in mind and a plan for accomplishing it. Clearly defined objectives that engage students in their own learning, defined strategies that are likely to achieve the objectives and a process to continually assesses progress, adjusting strategies based on that assessment. Intentional and purposeful connections such as effective use of data, partnerships, families, and communities that support students in being college & career ready.

24 ESE Definition of College and Career Ready Being College and Career Ready means that an individual has the knowledge, skills and experiences necessary for success in postsecondary education and economically viable career pathways in a 21st century economy. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 24

25 College and Career Ready (Continued) Academic proficiency alone is no longer enough to ensure that your students will have access to a job that offers security, a sustaining wage, and career advancement. Students also need to be proficient in the knowledge and skills that will help them navigate the workplace and function as contributing citizens. These 21 st Century skills (like the ability to collaborate, communicate in writing, think critically, problem solve and have a sense of competence) can be obtained through a combination of experiences. It is through these combined efforts to provide every student with academic rigor, real world relevance in their learning, and effective teaching both in and out of the classroom, that we will be able to ensure that every student leaves our schools ready to succeed in whatever awaits them after high school. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 25

26 Survey of Academic Youth Outcomes (SAYO) Evaluation System* SAYO is an Outcome Evaluation Tool that captures changes in youth that are associated with participation in a high-quality academic enrichment programs and likely to occur over a one- year period. Uses brief pre-participation and post-participation surveys to collect data from School day teachers and program staff. ASSESSING PROGRAM PRACTICES TOOL (APT) assess the extent to which 21 st CCLC programs are implementing practices congruent with their desired SAYO outcomes. The SAYO Tool Kit assists grantees with continuous program improvement and with identifying areas for professional development. * Training on using these evaluation tools provided by ESE Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 26

27 Expanded Learning Time (ELT) Overview

28 Serving ALL Students Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 28 At least 180 (647-B1) or 300 (225-C) additional hours for ALL students mandatory Appropriate mix of: Additional core academic time that is engaging for students Additional time for professional development and collaboration for all teachers and partners Additional time for meaningful enrichment opportunities for all students

29 Accountability – 225-C Using time to achieve positive student outcomes Site Visits Performance Agreements Performance Data Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 29

30 Time to Process Debrief with your team Make notes What questions do you still have? Break

31 Engaging Instruction and Enrichment Program Design

32 Opportunities for Engaging Instruction and Enrichment Using more time to provide more opportunities for: Creative and innovative teaching and learning Student-centered, hands-on, inquiry-based learning Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 32

33 Program Design with Student Engagement in Mind Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 33 By embedding academics into engaging projects we not only give students a richer and more in-depth learning experience but we are also are helping them to develop self-expression, critical thinking, problem solving skills and positive relationships.

34 Project Based Learning (PBL) High Quality PBL – Students gain content knowledge & academic skills, learn to solve problems, work in teams, think creatively, and communicate ideas. PBL is more than students simply making something (e.g. a collage about a story, constructing a model, or analyzing water samples from a lake). These activities could be part of a rigorous project if they help students meet a challenge. Not all "projects" involve creating a physical product; they may be oral or written presentation. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 34

35 PBL Example: Design a Shoe Sole Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 35 Students create shoe soles that meet specific needs of a potential user. Students learn about the biomechanics of the human foot in action. They researched treads and thicknesses of various athletic shoes to observe differences and similarities.

36 In a classroom designed to look like NASAs mission control room, sixth- and seventh-graders readied themselves to "launch" a space shuttle. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 36 PBL Example: Space Shuttle Launch

37 Digital Media Digital media and technology are revolutionizing how, where and when students learn. Digital media and technology should be viewed as tools that can: facilitate valuable learning opportunities; provide interactive experiences for personalized and engaging learning Digital tools are most effective when grounded in strong, learner-centered environments that are collaborative, relevant, and involve the application of knowledge through project-based opportunities. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 37

38 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 38 voices/nontraditional-soup / voices/nontraditional-soup Digital Media

39 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 39 FitMath* is a program that integrates mathematical concepts into physical activities. The deliberate use of mathematical terminology during aerobic exercise and construction of sports and games based on mathematical models, help engage students in learning to synthesize and transfer knowledge from the concrete to the abstract. The importance of play as a learning tool, the need to increase physical activity for our youth, and increasing knowledge in mathematics and health are basics of the program. *Training provided by ESE Fit Math

40 Service-learning* - A teaching and learning strategy that integrates meaningful service with instruction. All grantees are required to engage students in at least one service-learning or project-based learning project each year. Training will be provided. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 40 Elements of service-learning from KIDS Consortium.

41 Service-Learning: Examples During the school-day Urban Incidence of Asthma During OST Energy in Action! Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 41

42 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 42 Introducing Students to New & Engaging Learning Opportunities

43 Partnerships

44 The most successful programs have strong school-community partnerships that support student outcomes Including academic, social-emotional, civic engagement, wellness, family involvement Organizations with the same priorities, target populations From Contractor to Collaborator; One Way to Reciprocal Relationship

45 Partnership Examples Pittsfield Flying Deer Nature Center Berkshire Museum Berkshire Theatre Festival Triton Harlequyn Theatre UNH and MIT Salisbury Police Wareham Wareham Gleason YMCA Buzzards Bay Coalition National Marine Life Center Bay End Farm Parent Cafe

46 Questions?

47 Lunch Time Viewing School Sprouts: Birth of a Garden Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 47

48 Questions?

49 Teacher Leadership and Collaboration Common Planning Time Tools from the Field

50 More Teacher Leadership and Collaboration Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 50 time-teacher-leadership-and-collaboration time-teacher-leadership-and-collaboration

51 English Language Arts Common Plan Reflection Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 51 Please comment on how this weeks common planning session has helped you to make progress towards our team goals (listed above). How have this weeks activities influenced your growth as an educator?

52 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 52

53 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 53

54 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 54 Teacher Collaboration Time 40 min. daily during physical education 40 min. common prep 30 min. common lunch Twice monthly vertical teaming Example: Teacher Time at one MA ELT School

55 Scheduling Examples

56 Budget Workbook How to…!

57 Sustainability A.Marooned! Quiz B.Levers for Sustainability C.Tips and Traps

58 Marooned!: The Resource Quiz Your yacht, Schools Out, runs aground on the dreaded Level 4 Shoals during a storm that sent you miles off course. In the distance you see several islands in different directions, each about a days row away. You have no idea if they are inhabited, but they are your best chance of survival. Each of three lifeboats sets off for a different island. You are in a position to choose one person to accompany you and have just enough room to take one item to assist you with your trip/stay. Please review the lists and pick a passenger and cargo (independently) from the following lists. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 58 PassengersCargo 1. Celebrity Comediana. Your suitcases: clothes, books, toiletries, photographs 2. Chef: Specialty Organic Foodb. Fishing gear 3. Doctor: Specialty General Medicinec. Tool box – axe, shovel, hammer, wrenches, various hardware 4. Real Estate Agentd. Radio with strong signal but only enough battery for two days 5. Dairy Farmere. Well Stocked First Aid Kit: pain relievers, bandages, mirror, matches, etc. 6. Auto Mechanicf. Provisions and water for a week for two people

59 Where does the Money Go? ComponentIncrease in Cost Per Pupil Levers for Sustainability TeachersHighStaggering teacher schedules Human capital model for extended day Contractual provisions for teachers for extended day PartnersModerate/HighPartner-contributed resources Existing relationships with partners Mix of partners at different costs Transportation needs associated with partner time (on-site vs. off-site) TransportationModerate/HighContractual provisions for additional bus runs Number of schools on extended-day schedules CurriculumLow/ModerateExistence of instructional focus and alignment with existing curriculum Integration of enrichment and service learning with core curriculum Professional Development/Collaboration Low/ModerateAlignment of existing professional development and collaboration structures AdministratorsLow/ModerateCurrent contract provisions for additional time for extended day Staggering administrator schedules Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 59

60 Sustainability: Tips and Traps Think about the long-term from Day One Extended-day contract terms Viability of added programming post-grant Shop for affordable partners Strategic use of blended learning to extend human capital Maximize use and flexibility of all funding sources Flexibility of Title I, IIA per ESEA waiver Private grants Be your own funding advocate: mobilize your greater school community in support of your efforts and successes! Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 60

61 Questions?


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