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1. the problem DesignGovs Lost in Translation report found that a serious problem in business/government interactions is that the preconditions for high.

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Presentation on theme: "1. the problem DesignGovs Lost in Translation report found that a serious problem in business/government interactions is that the preconditions for high."— Presentation transcript:

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2 the problem DesignGovs Lost in Translation report found that a serious problem in business/government interactions is that the preconditions for high standard service provision in the APS are not consistently available across the Service. the idea To solve the problem, the report recommended Service by Design – an idea to facilitate development of a service-enabling infrastructure, built on common design principles and frameworks, to allow the APS to consistently provide better service. co-designing the solution On 8 November 2013, DesignGov facilitated a workshop with public servants from across the APS to co-design solutions to the problem and make the idea of Service by Design real. the solutions The co-design workshop developed four Service by Design concepts (tangible initiatives) to solve the problem. Concept 1 - MyProfile Like the MyGov login for individuals, MyProfile is a personalised automated service that businesses obtain for use on Australian Government digital services. Fully integrated with MyGov, MyProfile is a personalised yet automated service that allows seamless and low-effort business interactions with government. Concept 2 – The Right Start Policy The Right Start Policy is a service policy framework and accompanying policy toolkit. It helps public servants ensure their crucial first contact service to businesses is successful – whether first contact is online, on the phone or face to face. Better first contacts lay the foundation for more productive business- government interactions. Concept 3 – The APS Service Knowledge Café (ASK-C) ASK-C is the Australian Governments digital platform and knowledge repository for public servants and business to share knowledge and resources that improve customer service. ASK-C improves business-government interactions by helping overcome the barriers to good service caused by agency silos and lack of understanding of the impact of time delays for example. Concept 4 – The Outside-In View Policy Outside-in view is an APS customer service policy that improves service to Australian businesses through a framework and tools to help public servants and businesses understand what its like to be in one anothers shoes – to build empathy between them. This helps address the crucial expectations gap between business and government that leads to the mutual misunderstandings that affect business-government interactions. whats next? The Department of Human Services will be further investigating the Service by Design concepts to test their soundness in addressing the problem and to refine them. In addition, the concepts are not mutually exclusive: all or some may be picked up and adapted by individual departments as a first step to an integrated approach. more detail inside: The co-design workshop…………3 Concept 1: My Profile………………………….5 Concept 2: Right Start Policy:………………..7 Concept 3: APS Service Knowledge Café….9 Concept 4: The Outside-In View Policy……..11 Ideas catalogue…………………..13 Background The problem……………………….14 The idea……………………………15 overview 2

3 8 NOVEMBER 2013 Co-design workshop 8 November co-design workshop: 5 DesignGov staff, facilitating 18 public servants from Attorney-Generals Department, Department of Human Services, Immigration, Australian Tax Office, the Department of Industry and Customs and Border Protection. design tool 1: user journey map To the right are images of user journey maps drafted at the workshops. User journey maps get participants to take the ideas and aims for Service by Design, drawing on their own experience and the information gathered in the Lost in Translation report (the intangible why?) and focus on tangibly how we get there – what resources and other support is needed. In groups of 4-5, participants first drafted a current journey map setting out the current user experience of APS service. This helped identify and build group consensus about the major problems in current APS service that Service by Design could address. Next, participants then drafted a hypothetical journey map. This was the same customer journey, except with an ideal user experience of APS service – with solutions to the key problems noted in the current journey map. the process instructions for use A google search for how to do a user [or customer] journey map will yield links to sites that explain how to undertake a journey map. See for example: Also, searching user [or customer] journey map in Google images will yield some excellent visual expression of what a journey map is. You can find further links to how to do a journey map in the DesignGov Compendium. the participants 3

4 8 NOVEMBER 2013 Co-design workshop design tool 2 – desired future state brainstorm Drawing on the user journey maps, DesignGovs facilitators identified four broad ideas for how Service by Design could improve business-government interactions: 1 – Personalised service through an automated system 2 – Making the first touch point better 3 – Overcoming silos 4 – Supporting an outside-in view for public servants In the same groups of 4-5, participants were asked to design a concept that would make each idea tangible. The result was four Service by Design concepts. Have a look at the next few slides for more detail. instructions for use This desired future state brainstorming is just one way to develop a design concept. A google search for how to develop a design concept will yield valuable links. You can find further links to how to do a journey map in the DesignGov Compendium. the process 4

5 the concept Like the MyGov login for individuals, MyProfile is an automated personalised service. Businesses use a login to gain access to Australian Government (and potentially other jurisdictions) digital services. It allows for seamless and low-effort interaction with government. MyProfile seamlessly integrates with MyGov – so businesses who already have a MyGov login can automatically transfer that information across to MyProfile without needing to fill out that registration information again. And like MyGov, MyProfile is the only login that businesses need to obtain for use on any Australian Government digital service. The digital service suggests content for that business, based on information entered when the login is obtained, including updates on regulatory changes that will impact that business or eligibility of that business for government assistance. MyProfile should be expanded to cover local and territory and state government services too, to strengthen its low-effort, seamless qualities. how MyProfile works The business fills out their profile on registration If the business person already has a MyGov login, they only need to add some further details about their business – all their relevant information from MyGov is automatically transferred across without any effort The profile automatically filters government information using the profile The user receives information that is relevant to their personal situation The information in the MyProfile login automatically populates any forms the business needs to fill out – saving more time The information is agency blind – it comes from all areas of government relevant to the user comments at the workshop This is a no brainer The small business support line already exists Financially cheap but maybe hard to implement other suggestions MyProfile could include a live chat option (e.g. via skype) to improve service It could also include a business to business information sharing and advice platform – so should be linked to BabelGov (see the DesignGov website for more details on BabelGov) CONCEPT 1 MyProfile Service-Enabling Infrastructure Whole of government information Push tools updates user Personalised information SUPPLY DEMAND Automated system passes on the information the business needs Business seeks advice, information or services, registers for MyProfile 5

6 MyProfile Like the MyGov login for individuals, MyProfile allows businesses gain access to Australian Government digital services. It allows for seamless and low-effort interaction with government. MyProfile seamlessly integrates with MyGov – so business people who already have a MyGov login can automatically transfer that information across to MyProfile without needing to fill out that registration information again. And like MyGov, MyProfile uses existing whole of government authentication capabilities so that businesses can access any Australian Government digital service. VISUAL EXPRESSION MyProfile – what it could look like MyProfile login A one stop login for all business enquires Profile Forgotten your login? MyProfile About MyProfile Note: This website is just a mock up to help visualise and explain what the MyProfile concept would be like. Credit to the MyGov website for the layout of the mock up – see: https://my.gov.au/LoginServices/main/login?execut ion=e1s1 Links to MyProfile member services – MyProfile manages the businesses interaction with all these agencies. Ultimately MyProfile should be expanded to include territory and state and local government agencies too. Mock up of what the MyProfile website might look like account Here businesses log in. Once registered, MyProfile will automatically relevant information to businesses based on their profile e.g. to alert about regulatory change or government assistance 6

7 the concept CONCEPT 2 – MAKING THE FIRST TOUCH POINT BETTER Right Start Policy Right start policy High quality first touch points for ongoing good interactions between business and government Better training, reward and recognition for front line staff Expanded mygov app Sharing good practice The Right Start policy is a service policy framework and accompanying policy toolkit. It is aimed at helping public servants improve the first contact service they provide to businesses. That is, it means that businesses will always have a good, low- effort first contact experience when they interact with government – whether that first contact is online, on the phone or face to face. Right Start responds to evidence that the first contact is by far the most crucial interaction between government and business in building a strong relationship and delivering high quality service. By ensuring that interactions get off to a good start, the Right Start Policy sets the foundations for a productive and efficient relationship between government and business. Right Start framework also emphasises involving front line staff in service design Accompanying the framework is the Right Start Policy Toolkit The toolkit supports first contact service to business with a checklist for direct contact staff; business satisfaction survey development; persona development tools to help public servants empathise with their users; communications to business guides; customer standards development procedures; and how to provide customer service coaching and shadowing The MyProfile and MyGov websites and apps should be expanded and refined based on the Right Start Policy The toolkit also makes practical suggestions for individual APS business units to improve their first contact service – for example, guides on how to enable skillshares in every divisional and branch meeting so success stories are shared, how to create a one day a month project for front line staff to work on their own project that will improve the service that their branch provides, and including APS6 staff as front line staff to improve service. comments at the workshop We should trust the front line view Governments could call all new ABN holders to minimise non-compliance other suggestions My profile idea overlaps with this Improving both face to face and digital ensures all users will have an improved first touch point how Right Start works The Right Start Policy is implemented across all APS agencies It includes a policy framework to guide public servants in ensuring the first contact a business makes with is effective. This includes guides for public servants who design the digital platforms that businesses access The Right Start framework emphasises the importance of better training, reward, recognition and empowerment of front line staff 7

8 Right start policy Customer Service by Design This document sets out Right start – the Australian Governments customer service policy that aims to ensure that the first contact businesses make with Australian Government services is a good one This policy is about ensuring that the first interaction a business has with the Australian government always gets first good contact – whether person to person or on a digital platform. 1. What is this policy about? 2. Why has this policy been established? An Australian Government study of business - government interactions found that sometimes businesses were unhappy with the quality of service given by the Australian Government. The investigation also found that if the first interaction between business and government was high quality – this laid the foundations for a strong relationship and productive, efficient future interactions. Conversely, a poor first interaction could doom the relationship to inefficiency, frustration and loss of productivity. 3. Contents of this document Page 2 – Foreword from the Secretary Pages 3 -4 – Right start service framework Pages 5-10 – Customer service tools to help public servants make a right start CONCEPT 2 – MAKING THE FIRST TOUCH POINT BETTER The Right Start Policy Note: This first page of the Right Start Policy is just a mock up to help visualise and explain what the Right Start Policy would be like. Credit to the Department of Human Services for the layout – see: e-information/resources/ social- media.pdf The Right Start Policy The Right Start policy is a service policy framework and accompanying policy toolkit. It is aimed at helping public servants improve the first contact service they provide to businesses. That is, it means that businesses will always have a good, low-effort first contact experience when they interact with government – whether that first contact is online, on the phone or face to face. Mock up of what the Right Start Policy might look like 8 Right start would be a policy framework to improve customer service, by assisting public servants in making their first interaction with business a great interaction. It would be on both agency intranets and on the internet for the public to see. In addition to the right start framework, the right start policy would be a compendium of customer service tools and methods that public servants could draw on to improve the first interaction

9 the concept The APS Service Knowledge Café (ASK-C) is a digital platform that serves as a repository of APS customer service knowledge and resources. It is accessed by all agencies. As a whole-of-government information and resource sharing initiative, ASK-C helps overcome the barriers to high quality customer service caused by agency silos. In particular, it helps public servants obtain information and resources from other agencies that could help them provide better service to business. This sharing of information about business and public servant expectations of customer service will help overcome the mutual misunderstandings that have affected business/government interactions – that is, the gap between expectations of business and public servants that makes building a strong relationship difficult ASK-C includes the ASK-C wiki that allows for discussion of customer service in the APS for learning ASK-C has customer service awards to encourage high quality service to businesses CONCEPT 3 – OVERCOMING SILOS APS Service Knowledge Café (ASK-C) How it works ASK-C is a website accessible by public servants and by businesses The website includes a repository of research about the common attributes of good services, together with learning tools and links to who to talk to By allowing businesses to access ASK-C, they can share their suggestions for improved service delivery. They can also read about the experience of the public servants who provide customer service – helping develop empathy both ways APS Service Knowledge Cafe SUPPLY DEMAND Service-Enabling Infrastructure Learning tools Links to who to talk to Repository of good service research Other ASK-C features and resources are templates for common performance measures across agencies, complaints resolution advice, guidelines to parachuting experts into new areas to help establish them, and a customer service charter with accompanying tools Cultural change from the top supports these initiatives and encourages public servants to post information and share resources on ASK-C Notes This concept received the most votes from participants at the workshop Business seeks advice, information or services, Knowledge sharing within and between agencies supports high quality service 9

10 CONCEPT 3 – OVERCOMING SILOS APS Service Knowledge Café ASK-C – The APS Service Knowledge Café ASK-C – the APS Service Knowledge Café is a digital platform for public servants and businesses to share knowledge about customer service with each other By sharing service knowledge, ASK-C helps public servants overcome the barriers to high quality customer service Post on the ASK-C customer service forum here: Now trending: How to manage complaints and ensure they are actioned and lead to better service processes Read about customer service on the ASK-C Customer Service Wiki here: Article of the week: Customer service performance measures and how engagement with ASK-C is now measured and a deliverable for public servants Search ASK-C usernamepassword Remember me Login Who to talk to – public servants and businesses you can contact who are experts in customer service Share your customer service success stories, problems and complaints management knowledge here Learning tools – resources to help public servants provide high quality service Askc.gov.au APS customer service of the month winner For Outstanding service! ASK-C includes a customer service discussion forum and wiki for knowledge sharing To the right is a mockup of what the APS Service Knowledge Café (ASK-C) might look like. As a digital platform that serves as a repository of APS customer service knowledge and resources, it can be accessed by staff from all agencies and businesses/ the public. As a whole-of-government information and resource sharing initiative, ASK-C helps overcome the barriers to high quality customer service caused by agency silos. Above all, by encouraging experience, knowledge and resource sharing between business and government, it helps bridge the expectations gap between what business and public servants expect from each other. This empathy building will help secure a strong foundation for business government interactions and address the mutual misunderstandings that affect business government interactions. ASK-C includes customer service awards to incentivise, reward and recognise good service and helps encourage engagement with the website ASK – C is a platform for sharing customer service knowledge and resources beyond agency silos 10

11 the concept Outside-in view is a public sector customer service program. It is comprised of a number of initiatives designed to improve service to Australian businesses by helping public servants and businesses understand what its like to be in one anothers shoes – to build empathy between them. Putting themselves in the shoes of the businesses they serve helps public servants provide better service. For example, they better understand what a 30 day wait for what a business might feel should only take a few minutes feels like, and getting a better sense of what it feels like to have to wait on regulatory approval or to wade through government red tape. Similarly, businesses will better understand the environment in which public servants operate, and how what may appear to be tricks of procedure or unresponsiveness may actually serve an important purpose. This way, Outside-in makes a significant contribution to ending the mutual misunderstandings that affect business government interactions. CONCEPT 4 Outside-in view How it works Outside-in sets out a roadmap to support businesses and public servants to develop understanding of each other It recommends simple and accessible messages about the user and their needs, use of technology (e.g. videoconferences to link states and clients and officers), crowd/peer-to-peer training and sharing of tools In particular, Outside-in recommends targeted design jams (events where representatives of business and public servants network and co-design customer service improvement programs and ideas) Other suggestions for outside-in from the co-design workshop Outside-in should include engagement systems and collaboration, better sharing of client experiences, protocols for collaborating between agencies and engaging departments early, and principles/frameworks to reinforce the outside-in perspective SUPPLY Outside-in view Customer service program Using supporting technology Design jams Accessible messaging Crowd/ peer to peer training DEMAND Empathetic public servants able to provide better service that meets the needs of businesses Empathetic business seeks information or services but understands the constraints public servants face 11

12 Outside – in view The Australian Governments plan to build more empathetic and productive business/government interactions CONCEPT 4 Outside-in view Mock up of what the Outside-in program might look like Outside-in view is a public sector customer service program. It is comprised of a number of initiatives designed to improve service to Australian businesses by helping public servants and businesses understand what its like to be in one anothers shoes – to build empathy between them. Putting themselves in the shoes of the businesses they serve helps public servants provide better service. For example, they better understand what a 30 day wait for what a business might feel should only take a few minutes feels like, and getting a better sense of what it feels like to have to wait on regulatory approval or to wade through government red tape. Similarly, businesses will better understand the environment in which public servants operate, and how what may appear to be tricks of procedure or unresponsiveness may actually serve an important purpose. This way, Outside-in makes a significant contribution to ending the mutual misunderstandings that affect business government interactions. 12 Outside-in includes research on why empathy is important, and includes principles, tools and frameworks to help business and government put themselves in each others shoes Outside in is an official policy document that aims to improve business government interactions through empathy - helping business and government put themselves in one anothers shoes

13 Ideas catalogue Some other ideas for Service by Design Participants identified some qualities that Service by Design should aim to provide. Qualities to seek in touch points Staff have relevant knowledge and skills Staff have good knowledge of end users and their needs, empathy and understanding the users circumstances Staff have flexibility to navigate the edges of the rules that govern their work Staff are reliable, follow through and do what they said they would Staff are easy to deal with, even in a difficult situation Small business support line could call all new ABN holders to help them get set up as a business There could be a doing business mentor who assists the new starter Users get customer forms to fill out red tape requirements Public servant provides direct number for assistance Simple messaging to users User of technology to link public servants to users SUGGESTED QUALITIES Ideas catalogue Qualities to seek in emotions and experiences Single starting point, with smooth handover to relevant area if required Able to get in touch with a real person then and there – timely service and easy to find relevant area There is a one stop place to assist a person to set up a business Close and personal collaborations with physical spaces that allow for collaboration (e.g. Design Jams) Immersive ethnographic research Public servants bring users in early when designing customer service policy and programs Public servants can share tools Extensive data and market research and easy access to it for public servants Decision makers are involved in the process and empathetic to user needs, flexible enough to meet the users needs Protocols for collaborating between agencies 13

14 The preconditions for high standard service provision in the APS are not consistently available across the Service Jane and her partner Gavin run a bike importation and sales business. They find the government services in their business leaves a lot to be desired. Jane and Gavin were once told by the agency that the information they provided was not quite right – but not till late in the process. If the paperwork was not at the docks when the ship came in, the goods were sent to a costly storage facility. They find that things are occasionally held up as a result of minor problems that could have been resolved by short, upfront communication from the department. They say that the agency covers its tracks by saying in all of their documents Dont leave it to the last minute, but these are all your obligations – Jane doesnt feel that responsibility is equally understood on both sides. the problem businesses need: easier ways to find answers to their queries reduction of problems caused by some attitudes and behaviours by public servants with regard to cost, productivity and consequences incurred by businesses through incomplete or untimely advice or actions intermediaries need: definitive answers from government not having to repeat requests for further information public servants need: more opportunities to directly interact with businesses to improve mutual understanding better access to service-enabling infrastructure better capacity to collaborate and interact with business while facing competing demands businesses to understand the context and conditions under which the public sector is required to operate the needs to address THE CHALLENGE Treat me with respect Meet Jane the bicycle retailer Businesses need a public service that has regard for their circumstances. Public servants also need their roles and responsibilities understood and respected. Businesses require respectful treatment and certainty, as they are partners in delivering economic growth and employment, and achieving regulatory goals. There are, however, a number of barriers impeding public servants from providing that service. the context Jane is a composite persona that reflects the needs of dozens of businesses and intermediaries that DesignGov interviewed during the Business and Government Interactions project. For more information, please download the report (http://tinyurl.com/designgovfindings) and prospectus (http://tinyurl.com/designgovprospectus). 14

15 the idea Service by Design Embedding a bias for service within the public sector We are aiming to facilitate development of a service-enabling infrastructure, built on common design principles and frameworks, to allow the APS to consistently provide better service. how we get there What must Service by Design be able to achieve? explore how better hard and soft infrastructure can improve service delivery and interactions with business create a set of design principles for the entire APS harmony with existing service principles used in APS agencies design principles start with needs simplicity users drive design and content public servants to provide good service without jeopardising independence and impartiality assumptions there is key infrastructure to be targeted to implement Service by Design unknowns the cross agency services architecture for the APS and the UK Governments Design Principles can help inform Service by Design. changes to key infrastructure (systems, processes and capabilities) can allow public servants to offer better service for business without compromising impartiality. organisational challenges how will Service by Design interact with existing service and conduct principles and standards? Some of the factors to be considered during prototyping THE PROPOSITION Prototyping Service by Design the benefits businesses benefit by: having targeted interactions limiting the effort required experiencing considerate, understandable interactions and service government accommodating exceptions intermediaries benefit by: having two-way relationships, industry knowledge and professional expertise valued receiving considerate service public servants benefit by: providing good service adding value to policy and services allowing for tailoring of services receiving official support and training for high standards having principles of democracy reinforced DesignGov will be running a series of workshops aimed at further developing this concept and testing how it might work. If you would like to get involved, contact us through our or phone number ( ) SERVICE BY DESIGN SUPPLY DEMAND Business seeks advice, information or services Public sector frontline staff are service focused Service-Enabling Infrastructure Service Design Standards Service Design Principles Complaint Management Satisfaction Surveys 15


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