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Comprehensive Educational Plan

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Presentation on theme: "Comprehensive Educational Plan"— Presentation transcript:

1 Comprehensive Educational Plan
Developing the Comprehensive Educational Plan Before beginning the presentation, ensure that participants have a copy of the PDF versions of this Developing the Comprehensive Educational Plan deck, the submission presentation deck, the reviewers’ checklist, and the sample action plan pages. The overall presentation will be conducted in two parts: Developing the CEP, and the Submission of the CEP and other documents. Review the submission presentation at the end of this presentation. Introduce the presentation as follows: NY State’s approved ESEA waiver application requires schools not in good standing to complete a state designed School Comprehensive Educational Plan (SCEP) template. All other schools will be required to complete the CEP template that was developed last year, with some minor changes. This presentation focuses on the development of the CEP for schools identified as Reward, Recognition and In Good Standing. The NYSED will be providing additional information regarding Reward and Recognition schools in the near future. Guidance for Schools Designated as Reward, Recognition and In Good Standing Fall 2012

2 Comprehensive Education Plan: A Historic Look
Prior to SY’ Schools were identified under the New York State Differentiated Accountability system as PLA, Restructuring, Corrective Action, In Need of Improvement, In Good Standing, Rapidly Improving, and High Performing Schools All schools were required to complete the same Comprehensive Educational Plan template Today On September 23rd, President Obama announced an Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) regulatory flexibility initiative to revise No Child Left Behind (NCLB). On May 29th, the NYS waiver request was approved. On June19th, the Board of Regents adopted regulations to carry out the provisions of the waiver. The differentiated accountability designations are no longer being used. The new accountability designations include Reward Schools, Recognition Schools, In Good Standing, Local Assistance Plan Schools**, Priority Schools and Focus Schools. Priority Schools and Focus Schools will be required to complete a “School” Comprehensive Educational Plan (SCEP) that addresses findings and recommendations from their most current State review. In Good Standing, Recognition Schools, and Reward Schools will complete a Comprehensive Educational Plan (CEP) template that is very similar to last years CEP template. Additional sections have been added to both templates (Academic Intervention Services Report, Highly Qualified Teachers Report and Parent Involvement Policy/School-Parent Compact) to allow schools to respond to Federal, State and City requirements for continuous school improvement. The CEP will continue to be available for viewing on each school’s portal. Review the above information. Add: Under NY State’s ESEA Waiver has provided flexibility in budgeting, many requirements under Title I still apply. This will be discussed in future slides. A complete list of Title I requirements can found on the USED website, which is listed in this presentation. Emphasize that the CEP will continue to be a public-facing document (last bullet) and it is important for reviewer’s to review their responses to ensure coherence, appropriate use of context and goal and budget alignment. **NYSED will be providing additional information regarding the Local Assistance Plan designation later this year.

3 The Comprehensive Educational Plan (CEP)
Comprised of: School Leadership Team (SLT) signature page Annual Goal & Action Plan section Academic Intervention Services (AIS) report Highly Qualified Teachers (HQT) report Parent Involvement Policy (PIP) School-Parent Compact (SPC) Serves as the schoolwide plan for Title I Schoolwide Program (SWP) schools and addresses the required components of a Title I Targeted Assistance school. Guidance from Central is provided for specific sections of the CEP (Page 2). As stated earlier, when compared to the CEP template the template has remained relatively the same. There are some notable changes to the Goal and Action Plan and Academic Intervention Services sections. In addition, the HQT report has been removed from the action plan and added as a stand alone response at the end of the template. The cover page clearly distinguishes which template should be used and by whom. It should also be noted that components of the action plan that address the federal regulations Schoolwide Program (SWP) and Targeted Assistance (TA) schools requirements have once again been included in the action plan. However, schools will only respond to those sections, where applicable. Details on these changes will be provided in other parts of this presentation. The CEP is the vehicle by which the SLT communicate their educational plan to the school community. In addition, emphasize that the CEP is a tool that assists schools in their continuous improvement planning cycle. School Leadership Teams should have an opportunity throughout the year to revise their CEP action plans as more staff information and student data becomes available. As SLTs engage in the comprehensive improvement planning cycle during their meetings they will probably need to seek additional input from outside agencies (CBO’s) and their networks. Parent engagement this process is pivotal to the overall success of the plan. At the end of the year, SLT will engage to in a reflective process, using summative data to evaluate the effectiveness of their plan (CEP). That will complete the cycle and help transition to planning for the next school year.

4 Areas to be addressed Developing Annual Goals & Action Plans
Completing the Academic Intervention Services (AIS) Report, Highly Qualified Teachers Report and the Parent Involvement Policy (PIP) Overview of CEP requirements under Title I, Part A Review the areas to be addressed in this portion. Once again, mention that this is the first of two modules. Submission guidance will be reviewed at the end of this presentation.

5 Completing the School Leadership Team Signature Page
Must have a minimum of ten members and a maximum of 17 members (minimum of two students is required for high schools). CBO participation is optional. Must have an equal number of parents and staff. Mandatory members are included in the parent/staff count. Students and CBO members are not counted when assessing the parent/staff balance. CEP signature page must be signed in blue ink.  Originals must remain on file at the school.  The constituent group represented by each team member should be clearly identified (e.g., parent. staff, student). If an SLT member decides to withhold his/her signature for any reason, the member withholding the signature must submit a letter of explanation for submission along with the CEP. Mandatory members of the SLT include the Principal, UFT Chapter Leader, and Parent Association or Parent-Teacher Association President or their designees. Networks should review this section very carefully. Ensuring that the items discussed are adhered to. The Principal or SLT Chairperson should ensure that each team member understands the significance of his/her signature in this section and thereby provide the opportunity for any member to either sign and/or withhold his/her signature based on that understanding. Each team member’s name should be printed clearly in the far left hand column of the electronic copy. The signature on the paper copy should be applied in blue ink in the far right column. The original copy of the signature page remains on file in the school. For security reasons, signatures should never be placed on the electronic copy. If there is a constituent group listed in this section that does not apply to your school, it is advisable that an entry of “N/A” be included. For example, If your school is not a high school - student representation is not required, therefore an entry of “N/A” in the far left column for this row would advise the CEP reviewer that student participation is not required for your school and there is no missing information for this constituent group.

6 Developing Annual Goals & Action Plans
Say: During this section we will review each component of the Goal and Action Plan page in greater detail. Optional: You may want to refer to the sample Annual Goal and Action Plan as you review the information in this section or wait until the end and use it as part of your summary.

7 Annual Goals and Action Plans in the CEP
There are five Annual Goal and Action Plan templates. Each plan is comprised of an annual goal and five components of the action plan. The responses provided for each of the components on the action plan should align with the specific annual goal identified. The collective responses provided on the action plans provide the regulatory information required (formerly captured in the CEP appendices). Each school should complete 3-5 annual goals and action plans. Briefly review this slide and add the following: For those who developed a CEP last year, you will notice the HQT and Early Childhood components have been removed. The HQT is in the to be addressed later on and the early childhood component should be addressed in the activities section, if applicable. The components of the Goal and Action Plan page should be vertically aligned, where each component informs the other. The action plan needs to clearly articulate the who, what, how and by when. Each SMART goal developed should align with the action plan. Data provided will assist schools in developing the actions and strategies to be implemented throughout the schoolyear. Schools should include parent involvement components as part of their action plans, where applicable. The school’s PIP should be aligned to the action plans. As stated earlier, updates on the progress of the implementation should be included as part of a regular SLT meeting agenda item.

8 Revisiting Preliminary Goals
Review the preliminary goals submitted at the end of last year. For each goal, decide if the goal should remain the same or be revised. In June, the principal, in consultation with the member of the School Leadership Team, submitted this one-page preliminary goal and budget alignment summary page to their superintendent for review and certification. Schools should review the preliminary goals and determine whether they wish to continue to keep, modify, delete or add to these goals. The decision to revise or keep the goals should be informed by the most current data and citywide instructional expectations.

9 Setting Annual Goals in the CEP
Annual goals are generally intended to guide schoolwide planning and development. The goal-setting process should include a comprehensive analysis of school and student needs, identifying areas of focus for the coming school year. Annual goals may be adapted from goals set by the principal for the Principal Performance Review (PPR), if they are appropriate for use as schoolwide goals. Goals should be developed in consultation with the school community, the network team, and the community or high school superintendent. The goals should be based on school’s needs assessment. A school should develop goals to address its targeted population and strengthen its programs. They can be content specific but should also include goals that address citywide instructional expectations. Questions to consider when assisting a school’s in setting goals: Who are your target populations? What do you want to see them achieve? What are your goals for all students in the school? How will you measure progress towards your goal Reviewers should also refer to the guidance from Central on Page 2 (see below) regarding the CEP goals and the PPR. HOW DO CEP GOALS RELATE TO GOALS SET FOR THE PRINCIPAL PERFORMANCE REVIEW (PPR)? CEP goals are generally intended to guide school-wide planning and development. CEP goals may be coordinated with goals set by the principal for the Principal Performance Review (PPR) IF they are appropriate for use as school-wide goals.

10 Annual goals should be S.M.A.R.T.
Specific: Who is the targeted group (i.e., subgroup, grade level)? What is the relevant subject or area? Measurable: What measurement instrument will be used (State assessment results, Quality Review, Progress Report, School Survey, etc.)? How will achievement of the goal be quantified (percentage improvement, criterion- based benchmark)? Ambitious/Achievable: Is the goal attainable, yet challenging? Has enough time, fiscal support, and personnel been allocated? Realistic: Is the goal consistent with other school goals and aligned to the long-range vision? Is it too ambitious to be feasible? Time-bound: What is the projected time frame for meeting the goal? SMART Note that not all goals need to be student-based. Process goals that involve professional development, addressing the citywide instructional expectations or rolling out the CCLS could target teachers. The goal should be quantifiable and challenging enough to show that it will impact overall improvement, but realistic so that it is attainable. The goals should include a specific timeframe. Most goals are annual goals and have and end of year benchmark dates. The next slide provides examples of SMART goals. For each subject area identified, a goal and action plan is required. Goals should be aligned with the citywide Instructional expectations

11 Examples of SMART Goals
SMART goals should reflect the school’s priorities for the school year. They may or may not relate to specific content areas. Sample SMART goals that relate to particular content areas By June 2013, English language learners will demonstrate progress toward achieving State standards as measured by a 5% increase in students scoring at Levels 3 & 4 on the NYS ELA assessment. By June 2013, all students will experience 2 Common Core-aligned units of study in mathematics as evidenced by tasks, classroom observations and teacher-team evaluations. By June 2013, all students will demonstrate progress toward achieving college and career readiness as measured by a 5% increase in students scoring at Levels 3 and 4 on the NYS mathematics assessment. Sample SMART goals that don’t relate to particular content areas By June 2013, the whole school attendance rate will improve by at least 5% as measured in the school’s Annual Attendance Report. By August 2013, all students will make progress toward achieving the 80% State graduation rate standard as evidenced by a 4% increase in graduation rate. There will be a 5% increase in the number of students in their second year in earning 10 credits or more over the number of these same students who earned 10 or more credits in their first year ( ), as indicated on the Progress Report. As illustrated, goals can be content and non-content related. The second and third goals refer to the citywide instructional expectations. All the goals are quantifiable and include a specific metric or instrument so as to assist the school community in evaluating the effectiveness of the action plan.

12 Conducting A Comprehensive Needs Assessment
The needs assessment should be based on: A comprehensive review of your school’s educational program that is informed by the most current quantitative and qualitative data available regarding student performance trends and other indicators of progress. Root causes or barriers preventing the school’s continuous improvement. Targeted areas of the educational program that need to be strengthened or redesigned. Subject areas (and student groups) for which the school has self-identified during professional learning communities. Recommendations from the DOE Quality Review, Progress Report and Learning Environment Survey. Alignment to Citywide Instructional Expectations (CIE) Once the school has conducted a comprehensive needs assessment, as indicated in this slide, the school should identify the specific need(s) that warranted this goal. The need can be identified by using a variety of DOE (QR, LES, PR) and external data sources (NY State Education Department Assessment Data). Schools may want to refer to the Citywide Instructional Expectations (CIE) when identifying a need.

13 Instructional Strategies/Activities for the CEP
Provide a detailed description of how the school plans to achieve each annual goal, including: Identification of the target populations (student populations and/or staff) Type of activity or strategy being implemented to achieve the goal (professional development for staff, curriculum redesign, extended day/year instruction, implementation of new instructional program or assessment, etc.) Include the resources and responsible staff for the implementation, supervision and evaluation of the activity Describe the steps taken to include staff in the decision-making process around the use of assessments when evaluating the effectiveness of the strategy/activity: Explain how teachers will monitor and revise strategies/activities, if necessary, after assessing interim progress points (i.e., during common planning time or grade-level meetings) Provide an implementation timeline The action plan needs to clearly articulate the who, what, how and by when. Each SMART goal developed should align with the each action plan. Schools should include parent involvement components as part of their action plans, where applicable. Schools can use observations as a way of involving staff in the decision-making process around the use of assessments. However, the observation should be aligned with a quantifiable benchmark. Refer to the sample goals slide: By June 2013, all students will experience 2 Common Core-aligned units of study in mathematics as evidenced by tasks, classroom observations and teacher-team evaluations. Note that the quantifier is 2 Common Core-aligned units of study. Indicate that an observable benchmark might be reviewing student work during teacher-team meetings, with the expectation that students will have engaged in one unit of study by mid school year. The Title I school’s should keep in mind that the Parent Involvement Policy should be aligned to the action plans. Updates on the progress of the implementation should be included as a regular SLT meeting agenda item.

14 Strategies to Increase Parental Involvement
To ensure alignment with federal requirements, the Parent Involvement Policy (PIP) should address: use of technology, literacy, curriculum, standards and assessments used to measure student progress, and how parents can work with educators. For Title I schools For Non-Title I schools The activities and strategies listed in this section should be reflected in the school’s PIP. The PIP should include references to those topics highlighted above that are intended to keep parents informed about the school’s Title I program and help build school and parent capacity in support of student learning. Such workshops and/or activities include: training and professional development for parents and staff; regularly scheduled parent and school meetings (e.g., SLT, Annual Title I Parent Meeting, Title I Parent Committee, PA or PTA); school events (e.g., curriculum nights, parent- teacher conferences); and access to materials and resources that will be made available to parents for in-school and/or at-home use to support their child’s learning and monitor student progress. Identify activities and strategies to: engage parents in support of their child’s education share information with parents about the school’s educational programs provide resources offered by the school to support student achievement and meaningful parent involvement. (See above for suggestions.) Where possible, all schools should include a parent involvement strategy that supports the achievement of the identified goal. If a Title I school includes a strategy then it should also be reflected in their Parent Involvement Policy. Keep in mind that Title I schools receive parent involvement set aside funds to support those strategies that meet the Title I parent involvement parameters indicated in the federal requirements. The general areas are listed in the slide. Title I schools should refer to Title I, Part A, Section 1118 for additional guidance.

15 Service and Program Coordination
Describe how other school programs (see examples below) are used to enhance the activities/strategies included in this plan. Examples of programs and collaborations: Head Start program, including CBO and UPK Bullying intervention program Violence prevention program Nutrition program (i.e., Healthier US School Challenge, the Food Bank’s CookShop program, S.P.A.R.K.) Housing program CTE program Schools should consider how they will be able to enhance the activity or strategy by combining it with another program that currently exists in the school. Refer to the sample goals and say: For example, a school may have as one of their goals: By June 2013, the whole school attendance rate will improve by at least 5% as measured in the school’s Annual Attendance Report. The strategy may be to introduce a more robust attendance data collection and home contact process. This may include hiring an additional part-time family paraprofessional. However, to enhance the effectiveness of the strategy, a schools may want to include a CBO that they are currently partnering with to further enhance the strategy’s effectiveness. A description that indicates how the CBO will be used should described in this section.

16 Budget and Resource Alignment for the CEP
The budget and resources alignment section of the action plan has been modified to reflect broad categories of funding resources that schools will use to fund the activities identified on the action plan. The annual goals and action plans should help guide the allocation of these funds. Strategic resources include not only budgets but also staffing, training, and scheduling. Schools should maximize the use of these resources by coordinating with other activities and programs, as indicated in the Service and Program Coordination section. To complete the response: Check-off your school’s Title I status Check-off the funding sources used to support the activity, Examples of grants: SIG, 21st century, STEM If the activity is not supported by the funds listed, check off “Other” and provide a description in the space provided. There are two parts to this section of the action plan. First schools should check-off their Title I status. The status is located on the Excel spreadsheet in SAM # 8. the second part requires schools to identify the funding soures used to support the activity in the plan. Schools can also refer back to their School-Based CEP and Budget Initial Plan and Alignment form to see if the information provided is still applicable and can be used in their responses. Since these are general funding sources, schools should refer to their Galaxy to ensure that they are selecting the appropriate categories. School’s can refer to the sample action plan for additional guidance. If a funding source does not match one of the catogories listed in Galaxy, select “other’ and provide a brief description. As indicated in this slide, the funding source may not always be fiscal. For example, the activity is being supported by in-kind services from a CBO; and would not show-up on Galaxy. In this case, a brief decsription might be: The CBO partner is providing in-kind tuturing services to all students after schools. However, in this example, there may be costs associated for extending the school day; such as, security and custodial costs. The school should then check-off the funding source(s) or, if not supported by the funds listed, add the additional funding information where indicated. 16

17 Completing the Academic Intervention Services (AIS) Report and the Parent Involvement Policy (PIP)
Say: The next portion of this presentation will review the additional sections of the CEP that address federal and state requirements.

18 Completing the Academic Intervention Services (AIS) report
All schools must complete this chart Academic Intervention Services (AIS) include two components: Additional instruction to supplement the general curriculum (regular classroom instruction); and/or Student support services addressing barriers to improved academic performance, such as services provided by a guidance counselor, psychologist, or social worker, and/or any health-related services. All schools are required (State mandate) to provide: AIS to students who are considered at-risk for not meeting State standards in ELA, math, science, and/or social studies; and related at-risk support services. Describe the AIS program being implemented in each area. What program What structure When In last year’s version of the CEP template this section was broken up into two parts. The first part provided the number of students receiving AIS in each of the categories and the second part described the services provided to the at-risk students. The first part was removed from the template. All schools will be required to complete the remaining part. Schools should keep in mind the frequency, intensity and duration of such services may vary, but must be designed to respond to student needs as indicated below: Early Childhood: their performance on ECLAS 2 or other identified assessments, or who have been identified as potential holdovers. Elementary and Middle Level - Performing at Level 1 or Level 2 on New York State English language arts (ELA), mathematics, science, and social studies assessments. Secondary Level: Students in Grade 9 who performed at Level 1 or Level 2 on NYS Grade 8 ELA, mathematics, science, and social studies assessments or Students in Grades 10 – 12 who scored below the approved passing grade on any Regents examination required for graduation in English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. Students in grades 4 – 12 also require AIS in Science and Social Studies. Schools should ensure that if a student is receiving AIS for any one of the categories listed in the first column there should be description of the AIS program provided as indicated in the chart.

19 The Parent Involvement Policy (PIP)
The PIP is in both the CEP and the SCEP template All Title I schools are required to develop a Parent Involvement Policy, which includes a School-Parent Compact as a component. The policy and compact must be jointly developed and agreed upon by Title I parents and the school (through the School Leadership Team process). The Title I Parent Involvement Policy (PIP) describes how schools will involve parents as partners in their children’s education. The parent involvement activities included in the policy must be focused on improving student achievement and aligned with CEP goals. The PIP, through the School-Parent Compact, describes how the school will work with parents to help all the students meet high academic standards, The PIP is funded using the Title I parent involvement set-aside and must be evaluated annually by the school in consultation with Title I parent representatives. The PIP should be translated in the dominant languages spoken by parents in the school and distributed to all Title I parents in the school. The PIP and School-Parent Compact templates are included in the CEP template and includes information to address many of the requirements as outlined in Title I, Part A, Section 1118 of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Your school is encouraged to: use the template as it is provided, or align it in accordance with your school’s goals, or replace it entirely with a PIP created by your school that meets federal requirements. Before reviewing the talking points on the slide, say the following: The Parent Involvement Policy and School-Parent Compact provide the framework for how the school will support the meaningful involvement of Title I parents and guardians and effectively partner with them to help support the improvement of student achievement for all children. The activities and strategies included in the policy and compact are funded using the parent involvement set-aside allocation and should be linked to student achievement goals and school improvement initiatives outlined in the CEP. Schools should be reminded to remove the directions and heading from this section. The school should also delete the current PIP template, should the school decide to insert their own PIP and School-Parent Compact. However, they should compare their PIP with the current template as this template includes the minimum requirements outlined in the federal and state guidelines. Schools can also add to the PIP/SPC template.

20 The Parent Involvement Policy (PIP)
The PIP is in both the CEP and the SCEP template All Title I schools are required to develop a Parent Involvement Policy, which includes a School-Parent Compact as a component. The policy and compact must be jointly developed and agreed upon by Title I parents and the school (through the School Leadership Team process). The Title I Parent Involvement Policy (PIP) describes how schools will involve parents as partners in their children’s education. The parent involvement activities included in the policy must be focused on improving student achievement and aligned with CEP goals. The PIP, through the School-Parent Compact, describes how the school will work with parents to help all the students meet high academic standards, The PIP is funded using the Title I parent involvement set-aside and must be evaluated annually by the school in consultation with Title I parent representatives. The PIP should be translated in the dominant languages spoken by parents in the school and distributed to all Title I parents in the school. The PIP and School-Parent Compact templates are included in the CEP template and includes information to address many of the requirements as outlined in Title I, Part A, Section 1118 of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Your school is encouraged to: use the template as it is provided, or align it in accordance with your school’s goals, or replace it entirely with a PIP created by your school that meets federal requirements. Before reviewing the talking points on the slide, say the following: The Parent Involvement Policy and School-Parent Compact provide the framework for how the school will support the meaningful involvement of Title I parents and guardians and effectively partner with them to help support the improvement of student achievement for all children. The activities and strategies included in the policy and compact are funded using the parent involvement set-aside allocation and should be linked to student achievement goals and school improvement initiatives outlined in the CEP. Schools should be reminded to remove the directions and heading from this section. The school should also delete the current PIP template, should the school decide to insert their own PIP and School-Parent Compact. However, they should compare their PIP with the current template as this template includes the minimum requirements outlined in the federal and state guidelines. Schools can also add to the PIP/SPC template.

21 Title I Requirements and Guidance Regarding the S/CEP
Title I, Part A, Section 1118 requires that schools receiving Title I funds involve parents/guardians (adequate representation), in an organized, ongoing, and timely way, in the planning, review and improvement of the school’s CEP, including the joint planning, review, and improvement of the school’s parent involvement policy and school-parent compact. In a Title I school, students that are at-risk or most at-risk of not meeting state standards are eligible to participate in the program. Parents/Guardians of these students are also participants in the Title I program. In Title I schools, a Title I parent committee must be formed to represent these parents. Under Chancellor’s Regulation A-655, School Leadership Teams (SLTs) are responsible for facilitating this required consultation with Title I parent representatives. Title I schools are required to maintain documentation regarding the use of funds and program implementation. An annual review of the CEP, including the policy and compact, is required. Title I parent representatives must be involved, and their participation should be documented by the SLT. This slide provides general reminders regarding Title I requirements for Title I schools and Chancellor’s regulations for all schools.

22 2012-13 SCEP & CEP DEVELOPMENT & SUBMISSION TIMELINE
Activity Timeframe/Due Date Schools submit a draft copy (updated) CEPs to central NYCDOE via IPlan Portal. * January 18, 2013 School CEPs reviewed by central CFN and ELLCPS via IPlan Review Site* February 1, 2013 Schools revise CEPs, if needed, in response to feedback provided by central NYCDOE via IPlan.* February 15, 2013 Finalized (revised) CEPs due to central NYCDOE. March 1, 2013 Begin School CEPs posted on the NYCDOE website. March 15, 2013 This is the tentative calendar for CEP submission. Schools should refer to the Submission deck for additional regarding submission. *Submission guidance is available on the iPlan website (www.iplanportal.com)

23 Questions or Comments For technical support, or call For support in developing your CEP, contact your network CEP point person.


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