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INGHAM INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL DISTRICT Jeffrey Dole, IISD Career Preparation Specialist 517-244-1365

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Presentation on theme: "INGHAM INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL DISTRICT Jeffrey Dole, IISD Career Preparation Specialist 517-244-1365"— Presentation transcript:

1 INGHAM INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL DISTRICT Jeffrey Dole, IISD Career Preparation Specialist 517-244-1365 (jdole@inghamisd.org)

2 LEARNING GOALS: 1.Understand ACT Explore and Plan assessments. 2.Utilize a process for analyzing ACT data. 3.Understand how ACT data informs curriculum and instruction. 4.Use data to determine interventions. 5.Connecting Explore and Plan to Common Core

3 PROCESSES, RESOURCES AND SCHEDULE 8:00 AM – 2:30 PM Lunch – On your own 11 – 12 PM PowerPoint- Discussion Individual and group work Schools sharing best practices One folder for each school

4 TAKE YOUR LEARNING ONE STEP FURTHER Ideas going around in my mind Ideas that squared with my thinking Ideas I want to learn more about Ideas for connecting my learning

5 THE WILL TO SUCCEED IS NOTHING WITHOUT THE WILL TO PREPARE.

6 TO WHAT DEGREE DO YOU BELIEVE… ( AGREE OR DISAGREE?) All kids can learn? All kids are learning at their highest possible levels? All educators can learn? All educators are learning at the highest possible level? Data can target instruction needs? Educators target instructional needs using data? Educators should be held accountable for student growth? We will need the help of colleagues to meet the needs of all kids?

7 Disagree Agree Directions: Find one or more questions that resonate with you. Then find a colleague and do a 5 minute pair share.

8 WHAT YOU THINK DETERMINES… what you believe… what you say… what you do… who you are. All affect what our students learn, or do not learn.

9 ACT IS A PIECE OF THE PUZZLE…

10 ACT COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS SYSTEM MEASURING STUDENT PROGRESS TOWARD READINESS IMPROVING COURSE RIGOR SUPPORTING SOLUTIONS PLANNING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT EXPLORE 8th and 9th grade curriculum-based educational and career planning program PLAN 10th grade curriculum-based educational and career planning program The ACT 11th and 12 grade curriculum-based assessment for learning outcomes ENGAGE Middle and high school assessment that measures all factors of academic success QualityCore Research-driven solutions for strengthening curriculum CoreWork Diagnostics Online service to diagnose and improve content and practice areas Core Practice Audit Framework for evaluating current practices 1992 1986 1959

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12 POSSIBLE GRADES TESTED 7th grade 8 th grade9 th grade10 th grade Spring 2012 EXPLORE (IISD) EXPLORE (Michigan) PLAN (IISD) PLAN (Michigan) Spring 2013EXPLORE (IISD) EXPLORE (Michigan) PLAN (IISD) PLAN (Michigan)

13 EXPLORE 8th and 9th grade (score range 1 to 25) PLAN 10th grade (score range 1 to 32) ACT 11th and 12th grade (score range 1 to 36) An Explore score of 23 is the same as a Plan and ACT score of 23.

14 CURRICULUM-BASED ASSESSMENTS

15 Score Scales EXPLORE 8 th & 9 th Grade PLAN 10 th Grade The ACT 11 th & 12 th Grade 1– 25 1– 32 1- 36 Science Test (Content & number of items) 30 minutes 25 minutes 35 minutes Data Representation 12 10 15 Research Summaries 10 14 18 Conflicting Viewpoints 6 6 7 Total 28 30 40

16 Time to take the Math or Reading Test : 30 questions – 30 min

17 AFTER TAKING THE TEST: (10 MIN) 1. What surprised you? 2. What do you think your students will struggle with most? 3. What would you tell students as you prepare them for this test? 4. Please share successful preparation strategies.

18 PREPARING STUDENTS TO TAKE THE EXPLORE AND PLAN 1.Explain what the test is (measures knowledge) and what it is not (aptitude). 2.Explain predictability and career exploration component of each test. 3.Explain the testing process/procedures, just like ACT. 4.Send letter home to parents. 5.Show sample problems from each test. (act.org/explore) 6.Give a practice test untimed, then timed. 7.Share test taking tips, test prep sites and resources.

19 HELPFUL RESOURCES Career Search http://bls.gov/k12 http://michigan.gov/lmi http://www.mappingyour futurewww.mappingyour.biz/planyoucareer/careership http://www.acinet.org http://online.onetcenter.org http://www.myskillsmyfuture.org http://www.careercruising.com Test Preparation http://www. Number2.com http://www.act.org http://www.grockit.com http://www.mel.org College Exploration http://www.collegeconfidential.com http://www.michigancap.org http://www.careercruising.com

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21 ACTS COLLEGE READINESS STANDARDS Example: Mathematics College Readiness Standards College Readiness Standards Intervals 1-12 13-15 16-19 20-23 24-27 28-32 33-36 Source: http://www.act.org/standard/pdf/CRS.pdf

22 GLCEand HSCEs ACT College and Career Readiness Standards Common Core

23 HOW IMPORTANT IS THE MIDDLE SCHOOL TO COLLEGE READINESS?

24 College and Career Readiness

25 Scores: 13 - 23Scores 13 -27Scores: 28 -36 GLCE5177.3%7261.5%1515.2% Algebra I812.1%2420.5%4343.4% Geometry34.5%76.0%1313.1% Algebra II46.1%1210.3%1515.2% DISTRIBUTION OF MICHIGAN CONTENT EXPECTATIONS IN THE COLLEGE READINESS STANDARDS 66 115 86

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27 ACT – The Common Core State Standards Initiative is led by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers, in partnership with ACT, the College Board, and Achieve. Source: ACT.org

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29 WHY SHOULD SCHOOLS OFFER THE ACT EXPLORE AND PLAN? A RESPONSE TO OUR STAKEHOLDERS 1. Predicts ACT - MME performance 2. Identifies early problems, informs interventions 3. Guides curriculum and instruction 4. Helps prepare to be college and career ready

30 MICHIGAN DASHBOARD - 2012 Source - http://www.michigan.gov/midashboard

31 MICHIGAN DASHBOARD - 2012

32 AGE OF ACCOUNTABILITY 2004 06 10 2012 2014 2015 2013 MI adopts GLCEs MI adopts HSCEs MI adopts Common Core Teachers to begin providing instruction related to Common Core State Standards MI Gov. Council to develop Educator Eval. Tool based on student performance Smarter Balanced Assessments - Full implementation of fully functioning assessment system States administer summative assessments during last 12 weeks of school year http://www.smarterbalanced.org/timeline NCLB 08 MME & MMC What is to be taught?Are we teaching them well? How do we measure student growth?

33 INGHAM ISD COMMON CORE STANDARDS UPDATES/WORKDAY FEBRUARY 20, 2013 Updates include: An in-depth look at the Smarter Balanced Assessments. New model instructional units Critical instructional strategies for teaching the Common Core New information to help with aligning your curriculum Work time will be provided for district teams to continue alignment and gap analysis activities. For information contact: Amy Kilbridge, 517- 244- 1273 Theron Blakeslee, 517 -244-1201

34 COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS

35 DEFINING WHAT YOU WANT BEFORE YOU BEGIN TO MEASURE WHETHER YOU HAVE IT. 4 Minute Pair Share 1.( 2 minutes) Allow partner to describe college and career readiness without interruption. 2. ( 2 minutes) switch roles

36 ACT COLLEGE READINESS BENCHMARKS TestCollege CourseACT EnglishEnglish Composition18 MathCollege Algebra22 ReadingSocial Studies21 ScienceBiology24 2120 BiologyScience 21171615Social SciencesReading 22191817AlgebraMath 18151413English CompositionEnglish 9th Grade8th Grade ACTPLANCollege CourseTest EXPLORE

37 COLLEGE READINESS STANDARDS - ACT ACT defines college readiness as students having approximately a 75% chance of earning a grade of C or higher or a 50% chance of earning a grade of B or higher in first-year college English Composition; College Algebra; History, Psychology, Sociology, Political Science, or Economics; and Biology (credit- bearing courses) -ACT

38 CAREER READINESS - CTE 1.Authentic Problem Solving Skills 2.Self- Sufficiency Skills 3.Interacting with others Skills 4.Information and technology skills 5.Communications Skills

39 WORKKEYS® SKILL AREAS Reading for Information* Applied Mathematics* Locating Information* Applied Technology Teamwork Observation Listening Writing Business Writing ** 85% of ALL occupations utilize these skills Day 2 MME

40 COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS - CCSS The acquisition of the knowledge and skills a student needs to enroll and succeed in credit- bearing first year courses at a postsecondary institution (college, trade school or technical school) without the need for remediation. - ACT and Common Core State Standards

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42 1.Are your High School graduates college and career ready? 2.How do you know? TWO QUESTIONS TO THINK ABOUT -

43 WHAT PERCENTAGE OF EDUCATORS REPORTED THAT THEIR STUDENTS ARE PREPARED FOR COLLEGE-LEVEL WORK IN THEIR CONTENT AREA? Source: ACT national Curriculum Survey, 2009, pg.5, Fig 1.3

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45 HTTPS://WWW.MISCHOOLDATA.ORG/DISTRICTSCHOOLPROFILES/REPORTCARD/EDUCATIO NDASHBOARD.ASPXHTTPS://WWW.MISCHOOLDATA.ORG/DISTRICTSCHOOLPROFILES/REPORTCARD/EDUCATIO NDASHBOARD.ASPX ( DASHBOARD – EDIT REPORT – ENTER SCHOOL NAME)

46 INGHAM COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS Graduation rate and Dropout rate used for AYP MME % profic. (21%) Math = 57 Reading = 67 Basic Skills cut scores **Source – Mich. Graduation CCR Accreditation Comparison

47 INGHAM COUNTY HS % PROFICIENT ON ACT ( CLASS OF 2012) COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS ELA = 56.1% Reading = 43.7 % Math = 33.7 % Science= 27.1 % Overall = 21 % proficient on all four *** Source – Mich. Graduation CCR Accreditation Comparison ACT English CRS = 18 ACT Reading CRS = 21 ACT Math CRS = 22 ACT Science CRS = 24

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50 LETS LOOK AT THE CLASS OF 2015 ( 2011 8 TH GRADERS)

51 EXPLORE PROFILE SUMMARY REPORT PRESENTATION PACKET INGHAM COUNTY 8 TH GRADERS

52 2010-2011 EXPLORE PROFILE SUMMARY RPT – INGHAM COUNTY GRADE 8 HOW DOES OUR STUDENTS PERFORMANCE COMPARE WITH THAT OF STUDENTS IN THE NATIONAL NORM GROUP?

53 2010-2011 EXPLORE PROFILE SUMMARY REPORT – GRADE 8 ARE OUR STUDENTS ACHIEVING SIMILARLY ACROSS RACIAL/ETHNIC GROUPS?

54 2010-2011 EXPLORE PROFILE SUMMARY REPORT – GRADE 8 ARE OUR STUDENTS ACHIEVING SIMILARLY ACROSS GENDER GROUPS?

55 2010-2011 EXPLORE PROFILE SUMMARY REPORT – GRADE 8 IS THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF OUR STUDENTS FOR THE PAST THREE YEARS IMPROVING COMPARED TO THAT OF THE NATIONAL NORM GROUP?

56 2010-2011 EXPLORE PROFILE SUMMARY REPORT – GRADE 8 ARE OUR STUDENTS ADEQUATELY PREPARING THEMSELVES TO BE SUCCESSFUL? Core: Students who plan to take 4 or more years of English and 3 more years of mathematics, social studies & natural sciences

57 2010-2011 EXPLORE PROFILE SUMMARY REPORT – GRADE 8 ARE OUR STUDENTS ADEQUATELY PREPARING THEMSELVES TO BE SUCCESSFUL? Noncore: Students who do not plan to take 4 or more years of English and 3 more years of mathematics, social studies & natural sciences

58 SAMPLE PUBLIC SCHOOL ( K – 12) Total Students: 2686 Return Source: http://bridgemi.com/2012/05/see-how-your-local-schools-do-on-college-prephttp://bridgemi.com/2012/05/see-how-your-local-schools-do-on-college-prep This chart shows 40.7 % of the 2011 SAMPLE school graduates who took college classes after graduation took 1 or more remedial courses.

59 MIDASHBOARD – POST SECONDARY OUTCOMES – COLLEGE REMEDIAL COURSEWORK

60 INGHAM COUNTY HS COLLEGE CREDITS (SPRING 2012) CACC = 193 STUDENTS EARNED 1312 TTL. CR. LCC EARLY COLLEGE = 84 STUDENTS/ 446 CREDITS ONLINE INDEPENDENT COURSES = ? ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSE CREDITS = ? DUALLY ENROLLED = ?

61 DISCUSSION WITHIN GROUPS ( 20 MIN) Visit the website: https://www.mischooldata.orghttps://www.mischooldata.org and looking at the data specific to your district, discuss the following questions: 1.What surprised you most about the data? 2.What concerns you most? 3.What will you do with this information?

62 WHAT IS THE CURRENT STATUS OF COLLEGE READINESS FOR STUDENTS IN THE STATE ?

63 2010-11 MICHIGAN 4-YR REGULATORY ADJUSTED C0HORT GRADUATION RATES

64 State focus

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67 STATES WITH 100% OF STUDENTS TESTING

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70 2012 10 th graders who took the PLAN We can do better for our students! Student Name

71 WEIGHING THE PIGS DOESNT MAKE THEM ANY FATTER!!!

72 THREE WAYS TO GET BETTER FIGURES 1.Distort the figures. 2.Distort the system. Get demonstrated results at the expense of other results. 3.Improve the system. Brian Joiner, Joiner Associates Wherever theres fear, youll get wrong figures. Its what people think that counts. David Langford

73 WHAT CAN WE DO TO RAISE OUR SCORES? 1.Quality teachers and rigorous, relevant curriculum have the greatest impact. There is no substitute for quality instruction in the classroom. 2.Use data for school improvement and to assist individual students. - Revisiting curriculum and instruction - Integrate targeted ACT prep activities and remediation 3.Appropriate interventions at all 3 tiers 4.Stakeholder involvement ( Students, Parents, admin. Board) ** building a culture focused on College and Career readiness

74 ACT SCHOOL REPORTS Student Report Profile Summary Report Early Intervention Roster Item Response Summary

75 ACT COLLEGE & CAREER READINESS INFORMATION SYSTEM Five years of data for EXPLORE/PLAN/ACT Down to the student level At the aggregate level Follow cohorts as they move through Item-analysis to the standard level, including common core! Estimated release – Spring 2013

76 Interpreting the EXPLORE/PLAN Student Report

77 ANN TAYLOR AND MARCUS JONES - 2012 Ann – Struggles in school Does not like math or science. Spends a lot of time with friends EXPLORE score = 15 Marcus – Does well in school without much effort. Enjoys reading Active in sports. EXPLORE score = 18 Future Spartans??

78 EXPLORE Interpretive Visuals 9/2008 78 Score Report USING YOUR EXPLORE RESULTS

79 Slide 79 YOUR SCORES

80 Slide 80

81 EXPLORE Interpretive Visuals 9/2008 81 Estimated PLAN Composite Score Range Understanding Your Explore Results

82 EXPLORE Interpretive Visuals 9/2008 82 High School Graduation Requirements Using Your Explore Results

83 Slide 83 PROFILE FOR SUCCESS

84 Slide 84 1. More schools to choose 2. More scholarships 3. Greater earning potential WHAT IS A TWO POINT IMPROVEMENT WORTH?

85 U of M Ann Arbor Kalamazoo College Michigan State University Alma College SVSU Ferris State Community Colleges GPA: 3.8ACT: 29 - 33 GPA: 3.65 ACT: 26 - 31 GPA: 3.4ACT: 23 - 28 GPA: 3.5 avg.ACT: 21 - 27 GPA: 2.5 avg. ACT: 18 - 24 High School Graduation or GED CMU WMU GPA: 3.3ACT: 22 avg Admissions Guidelines for Michigan schools 2011/2012 Michigan Colleges GPA: 2.9-3.3 ACT: 22/ 17 min

86 CAREER CRUISING 1. Select Schools 2. Type in school name 3. Select Enrollment 4. Scroll down to ACT charts. Central Michigan University

87 School Average ACT (ACT Middle 50%) ACT Scores For ScholarshipiQualification Language Requiring @2nd Lang Req Michigan State University24-2830 Preferred, but if core course is taken in lieu of, it is waived U of M AA28-32Sliding Scale 2 years for LSA college but none in other colleges Grand Valley22-26LakerDeanFacultyPresidentialNo 23262932 U of M Dearborn25 Maize and BlueDean Chancel lors No 252731 Western Michigan2326No Wayne State University2125No Eastern Michigan University20-21Presidential No 21 Alma College22TrusteeDeanPresidential No, but recommended 202528

88 GRADUATE EARNING POWER SchoolGraduate Starting SalaryGraduate Mid-Career Salary Princeton58,000123,000 Harvard57,000121,000 Michigan50,00090,000 Michigan Tech50,00090,000 MSU44,00081,000 WMU41,00074,000 EMU38,00071,000 Ferris42,00070,000 CMU40,00065,000 GVSU37,00063,000 Wayne State36,00059,000

89 Student Data Analysis A 4-step process 1.Identify the incorrect answers 2.Determine cause of incorrect response 3. Identify and prioritize improvements 4.Complete T-Chart

90 SAMPLE: Test Results Item Analysis sheet EXPLORE MATH 04A -STUDENT SCORE REPORT and test booklets Item Analysis for Students STEP ONE: As you review the MATH section questions and answers with your teacher, circle whether your answer was correct or incorrect. This will allow you to focus on the strong items as well as those that may need to be readdressed. NOTE- Look closely at the number of the test item; they are not in order. They are grouped by the skill being measured. Pre-Algebra Student Results Notes 1. B Correct Incorrect 4. G Correct Incorrect 7. A Correct Incorrect Algebra Student Results Notes 5. A Correct Incorrect STEP TWO: Look carefully at the question and try to decide what caused you to select the wrong answer and make notes in the area provided. Is it a content problem (something that you have not yet learned or mastered)? Is it the question type (perhaps you are unfamiliar with the way the question is worded or how the information is presented)? Is it a testing issue (did the you get tired of testing or run out of time or just make a simple mistake)? STEP THREE: You now have a more clear indication of the areas that you may need to work on after completing steps one and two. On the back of your student score report there are suggestions of things that you can work on if you have weaknesses in particular areas. Put check marks next to the suggestions which would help you be prepared for the ACT next school year. STEP FOUR: Complete the strength and weakness T-chart and the reflection paragraph based on the information you have gathered from steps one, two and three. This will help you process your areas of strength and weakness and develop an action plan for improvement. Step 1 Step 2

91 91 Using Your Plan Results Your Skills Step 3 – Check improvements

92 Students keep this document in their portfolio and share with parents during conferences or parent meeting. Current math score = _____ Growth score goal for PLAN/ACT = _____ Career and College interests - Step 4

93 USING THE T- CHARTS Teachers use these responses to assist with differentiation in the classroom. Share with parents during conferences or parent informational meeting.

94 ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: 1.How much growth in academic achievement typically occurs during high school? 2.Can growth be accelerated so that more students are ready for college and career when they graduate from high school? 3.Do growth rates differ depending on the degree to which students are on target to becoming college and career ready?

95 AVERAGE GROWTH BETWEEN EIGHTH AND TWELFTH GRADES Source: ACT – Issues In College Readiness, How Much Growth toward College Readiness is Reasonable to Expect in High School?, 2009

96 AVERAGE GROWTH IN ACHIEVEMENT BETWEEN EIGHTH AND TWELFTH GRADES, BY DEGREE OF COLLEGE READINESS ENGLISH

97 MATHEMATICS

98 READING

99 SCIENCE

100 CHART SUMMARY Groups of students who were on target in 8 th grade were the only students who stayed on target in 10 th grade and went on to become ready for college level work by high school graduation.

101 HELPING STUDENTS SETS ATTAINABLE GOALS

102 SETTING CHALLENGING – YET REASONABLE – INDIVIDUAL STUDENT GROWTH GOALS ACT RECOMMENDATION Goal for students off target– On successive tests, reduce by ½ the difference between the students score on a given subject and the corresponding College Readiness Benchmark. Example – Explore Reading student score = 11 ( 4 pts below benchmark of 15) PLAN Benchmark for English = 17 4/2 = 2 17 – 2 = 15 therefore the growth goal for this student is to get a 15 on the PLAN reading test.

103 ACT RECOMMENDATION FOR GROWTH GOALS Goal for students nearly on target in 8 th grade – Meet benchmarks on the PLAN and exceed benchmarks on ACT. Goal for students on target at 8thgrade – Exceed benchmark scores on PLAN and ACT by 2 – 3 pts. or more OR have students focus on the post secondary goals EXPLORE PLAN ACT (MSU) 19 22 25

104 ITEM RESPONSE - WHAT IT SHOWS US: Percentage who selected the correct and incorrect response for each question. Average percentage who responded correctly in each content area. Reference group results to show comparison.

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107 ITEM ANALYSIS BY TEACHERS/DEPARTMENTS- TODAYS WORK Goal: Analyze student data to inform strengths and weaknesses in curriculum and instruction. 4 Steps: 1.Complete the analysis worksheet for the reading test. 2.Create Strengths and Weaknesses charts. (B.O.B.s & W.O.W.s) 3.Complete Content Expectations Chart 4.Complete School Improvement Planning Template

108 ITEM ANALYSIS BY TEACHERS STEP 1 – COMPLETE THE ITEM ANALYSIS WORKSHEET. DEPARTMENT - Look at the test booklets and the actual items. Then look at this years Item Response data, and considering the last three years data ( if available) determine the appropriate percentage to isolate items which are Strengths and Weaknesses. At what % will you consider the items to be a curriculum and/or instructional Strength and Weakness? INDIVIDUALLY - Complete the worksheet notes as you look over the test booklet. Then discuss as a department: Why do you think your students did well on the strengths items? Why do you think your students did not do well on the weakness items?

109 ITEM RESPONSE SUMMARY REPORT CCRW Manual p. 94

110 Math: PLAN Test Results Item Analysis for Staff STEP ONE: As you review the Math section questions and answers, if the students have an _____% or higher on an item, circle strength and if the students have a _____ % or less on an item, circle weakness. This will allow us to focus on very strong items and those that we need to readdress. INDIVIDUALLY make any necessary notes that you notice about each type of question (content issue, question type or testing issue). Pre- Algebra > 80% < 60% Notes 1. AF Strength Weakness 11. BG Strength Weakness 21. AF Strength Weakness 25. DJ Strength Weakness 32. BG Strength Weakness 37. BG Strength Weakness Elementary Algebra > 80% < 60% Notes 7. CH Strength Weakness 12 AF Strength Weakness 14. CH Strength Weakness 16. BG Strength Weakness 24. AF Strength Weakness 27. DJ Strength Weakness 29. AF Strength Weakness Geometry > 80% < 60% Notes 2. CH Strength Weakness 4. D J Strength Weakness 5. AF Strength Weakness 10. BG Strength Weakness 17. DJ Strength Weakness

111 STEP 2 – CUT STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES ITEMS AND PASTE TO CHART PAPER College Readiness Standard: Math - Expressions, Equations, and Inequalities (XEI): 601 (28-32) – Manipulate expressions and equations

112 MATH DEPARTMENT - 2 CHARTS StrengthsWeaknesses Calculating the average, given frequency counts of all the data values Recognizing equivalent fractions and fractions in lowest terms Items 1,5,22 Items 3,9, 18, 27 Items 4,13, 18, 23 Order of operations

113 STEP 3 – AS A DEPARTMENT, COMPLETE THE CONTENT EXPECTATION CHART. 1.Content of weaknesses WHAT 2.Essential Learning Skills using ACT CRS WHAT 3.Chapter, section, unit taught (SKIP) WHERE 4.Test taking concerns WHY 5.Instructional strategies to implement HOW The true value is in the process not the product.

114 Completed as a department * *

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116 Please focus on GOOD instruction when planning for the Instructional Strategies to Implement piece. Will the students be engaged? What toolbox strategies will be most effective? Do I need to differentiate instruction? Are there other strategies that can be used which are not in the toolbox? WHAT IS GOOD INSTRUCTION? Step #3

117 Building coherence between MS and HS curriculum

118 ITEM ANALYSIS BY TEACHERS STEP 4- COMPLETE SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLANNING TEMPLATE. BASED ON THE DATA YOU HAVE JUST ANALYZED: 1. Write a statement of gap in student achievement 2. Fill in the contributing cause for the gap in student achievement. 3. Create a measurable objective statement to support the goal. 4. Create some possible strategy statements.

119 Step #4

120 MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION CNA. SIP REVISED.V13.2010 1. Based on a review of the data and the staff discussion around the questions and proceeding pages, state the schools conclusions regarding the strengths and challenges ( weaknesses)of the students learning need. Strengths: Challenges: 2. For the challenges above, what content area goals have the school established for student achievement that will addressed in the school improvement plan Content Area: ________________________________ Student Achievement Goals: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 3. For the goals listed above, what did the school student data identify as the gap between where current student achievement is and where the building would like to be? Content Area: ________________________________ Student Achievement Goals: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 4. For each of the identified gaps listed above, based on the schools discussion and current trends in student learning, what has the school determined to be the leading cause(s) for the gap in performance? Content Area: ________________________________ Student Achievement Goals: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________

121 Important for everyone to be on the same page. Belief in a Pre K-12 system Knowledge of Common Core and College Readiness Shared vocabulary and expectations Building on each others goals, sharing information and developing commonalities DISTRICT/BUILDING GOALS

122 All graduates of the _____ Public Schools will be College Ready, Career Ready and Life Ready in English Language Arts. All graduates of the _______ Public Schools will be College Ready, Career Ready and Life Ready in Mathematics. All graduates of the _______Public Schools will be College Ready, Career Ready and Life Ready in Science. DISTRICT GOALS

123 WORK TIME 4 Steps: 1.Complete the analysis worksheet for the EXPLORE reading test 2.Create Strengths and Weaknesses charts. (B.O.B.s & W.O.W.s) 3.Complete Content Expectations Chart 4.Complete School Improvement Planning Template

124 COMMON CORE CONNECTION: INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES Shared responsibility for students literacy development Pg. 4 - Common Core State standards for ELA and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

125 WHAT ABOUT AFTER TODAY? Use weakness items as openers. Find out why students are struggling. Give PLAN just like the ACT Create assessment items similar to ACT Get stakeholders invested. Use supplemental questions. Complete planning template Creating Interventions of support

126 5. Which statement best explains the difference in the average yearly temperature range for Walvis Bay & Gaborone? a. Walvis Bay is farther inland which heats up and cools down faster than coastal cities. b. Gaborone is located farther from the equator and receives less solar energy from the sun. c. Gaborone is located closer to the equator and receives more solar energy from the sun. d. Walvis is closer to the ocean which keeps the temperatures fairly consistent throughout the year. Use the diagrams below to answer questions 5-8. On the left is a climograph for southern Africa, the right is a map showing the direction ocean currents move on the east and west coast of the country. Southern Africa is in the southern hemisphere, so the warmer regions should be in the north and cooler regions should be farther south. Social Studies Inferential (Book/Brain) Reading Charts Back

127 POST TEST PARENT MEETING ( AGENDA) During the parent session we will: Review basic fundamentals of the Explore, Plan and ACT/MME assessments Hand out and explain the various components of the Student Score Report Identify how Explore and Plan results can help students prepare for the ACT Have students share T- charts with parents

128 SECTION V – SUPPLEMENTAL LOCAL ITEMS Please indicate how much you agree or disagree with each of the following statements: (a)Strongly agree (b)Agree (c)Disagree (d)Strongly disagree (e)Not sure 1.I get the support I need from my teachers. 2.I usually feel nervous/stressed/anxious about test taking. 3.The classes at my school are interesting and challenging. 4.I learn a lot from working in groups. 5.The classes I am taking are properly preparing me for life beyond high school. 6.I know where to get help when I am struggling in school. 7.I have a career and/or college plan after high school.

129 POSSIBLE INTERVENTIONS District Initiative – Pyramid of intervention training for staff. District Interventions for Students – Summer programs, universal screening Building Interventions – Academic Center support, Blended Service model, Math Lab, Reading Lab, Before/ After school academic support and Title 1 support.

130 CONCLUSION Use all ACT data reports as one source to measure student growth. Involve students, parents and staff in the data analysis Much of the ACT is middle school content Student who are on target tend to stay that way. Students who are off target need interventions before and throughout high school Setting reasonable, yet challenging, growth goals for all students is one way of helping them stay on track

131 SHARING PROGRESS/ADVICE Diane Newman Haslett HS RtI Coach

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133 EXPLORE, PLAN AND ACT ACTION PLANNING 1.Who will take new information about preparing for EXPLORE/PLAN/ACT back to your building/ 2.Who will present the new information? 3.Have you created a building-wide schedule for practice tests? 4.Who will coordinate the schedule? Organize materials? 5.Do we have a literacy across the curriculum focus in your building? 6.If not, who would initiate implementation of a school-wide literacy focus? 7.Do you have interventions in place for struggling readers?

134 CONTACT INFORMATION Jeffrey Dole IISD Career Preparation Specialist 517-244-1365 jdole@inghamisd.org


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