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1 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet 15 January 2014 Optimizing The Fleet Response Plan ADM Bill Gortney.

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Presentation on theme: "1 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet 15 January 2014 Optimizing The Fleet Response Plan ADM Bill Gortney."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet 15 January 2014 Optimizing The Fleet Response Plan ADM Bill Gortney

2 2 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Assess EndsWays RESOURCE / POLICY ACCESS / PROCURE PRE- INTRO BASICINTEGRATED MAINT DEPLOY & SUSTAIN FRTP Surface Aviation Submarines C4ISR/CYBER NECC Weapon System OP/TAC HQs Everyone is part of the Readiness Kill Chain Everyone needs to know their place and role in the Readiness Kill Chain Means and Ways must support the Ends – our Deployability / Sustainment model, the FRP Common Actions Synchronized Training Full Weapon System Ops Means Personnel Equipment Supplies Training Ordnance Networks Installations Community Industry Elected Leaders Governance / C2 – Drives integration & synchronization vertically across weapons systems & horizontally across the readiness lifecycle As of 08MAY13 Readiness Kill Chain Past, Present, Way Ahead 2

3 3 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet The Readiness Kill Chain (RKC) is a way to break down institutional barriers, increase understanding of readiness production, ensure a common understanding of Navy readiness on the same page, and ensure that policies, resources, and products deliver the right capability and readiness for mission requirements. Specifically, RKC is a repeatable methodology to identify readiness production barriers and root causes, followed by development of effective strategies and solutions to remove these barriers. These processes result in complete assessment and presentation for decisions used to improve forward deployed readiness and resolve barriers in an informed and cost effective manner. O-FRP is one example of implementation of the RKC. O-FRP uses the RKC approach to analyze various stages of the processes for training, inspections, parts, maintenance and manning to achieve desired end states. What is RKC?

4 4 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet We will deliver credible capability for deterrence, sea control, and power projection to deter or contain conflict and fight and win wars. Operate forward at strategic maritime crossroads; Sustain our fleet capability through effective maintenance, timely modernization, and sustained production of proven ships and aircraft.. Operate forward at strategic maritime crossroads; Sustain our fleet capability through effective maintenance, timely modernization, and sustained production of proven ships and aircraft.. We must ensure todays force is ready for its assigned missions. Maintaining ships and aircraft to their expected service lives is an essential contribution to fleet capacity W ARFIGHTING F IRST W ARFIGHTING F IRST O PERATE F ORWARD O PERATE F ORWARD B E R EADY B E R EADY We will operationalize the Sailing Directions through the Optimized Fleet Response Plan using the Readiness Kill Chain (RKC) CNO Guidance We developed the Optimized Fleet Response Plan to establish a more manning-balanced and sustainable cycle… - CNO Position Report: 2013, p 3

5 5 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet The CNOs tenets as outlined in his Sailing directions and reinforced in the Navigation Plan are clear. The Readiness Kill Chain approach provides us a holistic construct, or methodology, to ensure the Fleet is focused on warfighting … forward … and ready to conduct missions assigned and O-FRP is the answer to how we balance those priorities. CNOs Tenets

6 6 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet The Optimized Fleet Response Plan (O-FRP) has been developed to enhance the stability and predictability for our Sailors and families by aligning carrier strike group assets to a new 36 month training and deployment cycle. Beginning in fiscal year 15, all required maintenance, training, evaluations and a single eight-month deployment will be efficiently scheduled throughout the cycle in such a manner to drive down costs and increase overall fleet readiness. Under this plan, we will streamline the inspection and evaluation process and ensure that we are able to maintain a level of surge capacity. O-FRP reduces time at sea and increases home port tempo from 49% to 68% for our Sailors over the 36 month period. Initially focused on Carrier Strike Groups, O-FRP will ultimately be designed for all U.S Navy assets from the ARG/MEU to submarines and expeditionary forces. What is O-FRP?

7 7 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Fleet Response Plan Problem Statement We have lost predictability For Sailors, families, industrial base Readiness producers, and readiness consumers Length does not accommodate maintenance and training … or maximize operational availability Misaligned CSG / DESRON Chains of Command Manning levels not aligned to the phases of FRP Maintenance and modernization Not executing on time / budget Requires better synchronization Underfunded spares accounts Unconstrained inspection process Lack of standardized Operational /Tactical HQ academic, synthetic, and live training

8 8 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Potential Drivers to Readiness Production C3 C5 C2 C4 IKE CSG FEB11 – SEP13 C3 C5 C2 C4 HST CSG JUL10 – SEP13 Model Readiness Actual profile Anticipated profile Cost Driver – Maintenance Driven FRP Inefficiency Cost Driver – Schedule Driven FRP Inefficiency C3 C5 C2 C4 NIM CSG FEB11 – SEP13 Cost Driver – Maintenance and Schedule Driven FRP Inefficiency Traditional Fleet FRP

9 9 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet The previous slide graphically depicts inefficiencies. The solid blue line represents our readiness model and the dashed line is reality for these three Strike Groups. Each of these three profiles is unique and our generic profile is not reliably predictive of the investment of our means and ways in this process. IKE CSG faced maintenance challenges which delayed her work-ups and deployment and then she conducted a second deployment after a short homeport visit. HST CSG trained up and then delayed due to a change in presence requirements – we banked her readiness during this delay. NIM CSG was a combination of both maintenance and schedule delays. Comparing a generic planning FRP profile to these CSGs profiles highlights the need to find a model that is more predictable and reliable in the planning process and ensures that we conserve scarce resources and money. O-FRP establishes a framework to develop a predictive model that will drive each CSG to look and execute a more similar FRP profile. Understanding Potential Drivers to Readiness Production Slide

10 10 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet DepSecDef-driven concept to generate CSG Ao –7-7-7 plan (Deploy/Dwell/Deploy) –49 percent Homeport Time –Deployments are 39 percent of the FRP length –ECP Frame work : Provides a predictable FRP cycle Extends/synchs CVN/CVW/SC FRP cycles to 36 months Fixes CSG composition: Ships/aircraft/staffs remain aligned thru entire FRP cycle Generates fully ready forces, trained to a single MCO certification standard Establishes a stable and predictable maintenance plan Maintenance interval remains constant –ECP concept ended Jan 13 due to sequester/POM fiscal limits O-FRP Predecessor: Enhanced Carrier Presence

11 11 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet The following series of slides describe progress achieved in our effort to manage Fleet wholeness across the Readiness Kill Chain (RKC) through the Optimized-Fleet Response Plan (O-FRP). Managed Wholeness, is a term USFF coined to describe how we are leading our forces through the tough fiscal turbulence expected over the coming years. Managed Wholeness

12 12 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Weve started FY 14 under a Continuing Resolution Amendment at reduced funding levels. Additionally, we are constrained by our current manpower levels and force structure. As a result, we have to carefully manage the wholeness of the Fleet with innovative cost saving measures that optimize readiness at the reduced funding levels. Current Fiscal Environment

13 13 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Retains ECP framework / capacity with reduced global Ao (~2.0) –36 month FRP –Single 8-month deployment –Starts with HST CSG in Nov 2014 Enables delivery of: –Fixed CSG Composition –Aligned and stabilized CSG manning throughout the FRP –Stable maintenance plan –Improved quality of work and enhanced quality of life –Embedded Electromagnetic Spectrum Maneuver Warfare and Naval Integrated Fire Control – Counter Air –Forces trained to a single certification standard Optimized Fleet Response Plan (O-FRP)

14 14 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Optimized FRP Lines of Effort Lines of Effort Advanced Training (USFF / CPF N7) Maintenance/ Modernization (NAVSEA / NAVAIR USFF / CPF ) Manning/ Individual Training (OPNAV N1 /USFF) CSG Alignment (USFF / CPF N3) FRP Length (USFF / CPF OPNAV N3 ) Unit Training (TYCOMs) Inspections (USFF/CPF N43) Operational & Tactical HQs (USFF / CPF N7) Parts (USFF / CPF N41 OPNAV N8/N9 )

15 15 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet FRP Length Maximum CSG Operational Availability (Ao) –36 month FRP –Supply-based; surge capacity dependent upon funding –Maximum forward presence with available capacity and funding –Predictable, yet adaptable –Able to meet FY14-16 with 2.0 CVN and 27 SC (includes 9+4 FDNF) For the sunk cost of maintenance & training, maximize Ao, with a clean chain of command, and an acceptable PERSTEMPO ECPO-FRP Length7 / 7 / 78 Homeport Tempo D / FRP PREDICTABLE ADAPTABLE

16 16 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet What is A O ? A O is Operational Availability. Basically, this is the time a platform is employable. –This does not take into consideration OPTEMPO and PERSTEMPO. The formula is the cycle length minus maintenance and training. For example, in the 36-month O-FRP cycle, there are approximately 6 months maintenance and 6 training. Therefore, A O is approximately 24 months. A O = [ Cycle length – (maintenance time and training time)] A O = 36-(6+6) = 24 This does not mean that a Carrier Strike Group will be deployed for the entire Operational Availability. Under O-FRP, deployment lengths are metered by Service Quality of Life factors. A O is simply a measure of when a platform is employable, and is used for planning both for rotational deployment and to determine surge capacity should a National emergency arise.

17 17 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet FRP Length 36 month FRP cycle becomes the foundation upon which we generate CSGs ready for deployment and provides maximum Ao for CSG presence/funding level. Under a sustainable O-FRP, a single 8 month deployment generates a deployed to FRP ratio (D/FRP) of 0.22 (or in other terms 5 CVNs can generate 1.0 global presence) with the ability to go to 0.38 (or 3 CVNs to generate a 1.0 presence) should resources ever become available. These CSGs will be composed of 7-8, vice current 3-4, surface combatants who will be aligned under a single DESRON and will aggregate for training and certification. Surface combatants deployment dates may vary slightly due to maintaining Global Force Management Allocation Plan (GFMAP) adjudicated presence requirements: Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD), SCAN EAGLE, and FIRE SCOUT.

18 18 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet CSG Alignment Iterative changes will be required in out years to complete Problem: CSG and Destroyer Squadron Misalignment -Operational Control (OPCON) and Administrative Control (ADCON) Chain of Command and FITREPS -DESRON Commanders do not deploy with their assigned SC -CSGs deploy with SC from multiple squadrons –Multiple Independent deployer CERTEX events required Advanced training produces lesser qualification (MSO vs. MCO) -DESRON SC FRP cycles not in alignment -Capability mismatch with CSG Solution: Fixed CSG Composition -C2 Aligned with FRP cycle -OPCON aligned with deployment cycle -SC schedules more predictable -BMD integrated within CSG -Surface combatant CMP aligned with CVN -Cost effective, Major Combat Operations Independent deployers

19 19 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet CSG Alignment When examining DESRON alignments in conjunction with O-FRP, we saw an opportunity to fix numerous discrepancies, such as wholesale surface combatant swap outs between CSG multiple deployments as well as integrating BMD capability into CSGs. O-FRP aligns surface combatant and CVN/CVW cycles to optimize resources required to achieve deployment certification. Simple administrative alignment near term achieves 90% DESRON alignment. 21 of 29 moves have been mapped out for TYCOM execution to support 4 CSGs. USFF is changing DESRON assignments so that all CRUDES will be aligned to their CSGs starting with the GHWB CSG for their FEB 2014 deployment. Ownership alignment also allows ISICs to begin transmitting Commanders intent to assigned units early – operational and professional expectations.

20 20 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Manning Wholeness Personnel readiness standard –92/95/1 minimum deployment manning levels –Take risk in non-deployed units and post deployment surge Actions to achieve wholeness –Recruit/Access to meet demand –Manage Street to Fleet supply chain –Fund the Individuals Accounts –Define and prioritize critical operational shore duty billets Manage and sustain wholeness –Report and manage individual PERSTEMPO –Incentivize and retain quality sailors –Manage FIT/FILL risk ashore –Established PERS-454 to streamline LIMDU process

21 21 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet In the previous slide, we used 92/95/1 as our endstate. This is also known as FIT / FILL / Critical NEC The first number is FIT –This indicates that a commanding officer will have 92 percent of sailors authorized with the right skill sets The second number is FILL –This number indicates that at least 95 percent of the required manning is on board The third and final number indicates that there is at least 1 sailor on board that has the qualifications for every critical Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) FIT/FILL/CRITICAL NEC

22 22 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet The Fleet continues to face a fit/fill below the standard of 90/90/1 with an upward in trend of cross decks and diverts needed to maintain that standard. After a TYCOM RKC review and a USFF N1 led Navy-wide working group, a CNO approved POAM was developed to increase the personnel readiness target, set actions to achieve wholeness and manage and sustain the gains. OPNAV N1 was given the lead to execute the POAM. Manning

23 23 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet HST CSG Manning to O-FRP

24 24 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet CNO Availability schedules are set : –Aligned with CRUDES assignment to CSGs –Stable, predictable and integrated maintenance and modernization plan –Proper availability planning –Allowance for timely port loading adjustments –Integrated with assessments –Aligns Surface Ship Class Maintenance Plan to 36 months to match CVNs Modernization improvements: –Interoperable and aligned CSG/ARG C5I capabilities –Integrated SOVT test to include all associated supporting systems Improved aircraft inventory management to fully support training plan Adjust SFRM to 36 month FRP Maintenance & Modernization Stable, Predictable, Integrated Maintenance & Modernization that aligns and synchronizes CSG capabilities

25 25 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Turning to maintenance and using the kill chain As is / To be construct, we found that maintenance was impacted by changes in schedules and funding, and is constrained by port loading. Thumb-rule used by maintenance providers is that costs go up by 3x for work packages changes through mid-availability and as much as 8X for changes in work packages from mid-to-late availability. So, this is a significant cost driver. We also found that modernization is not aligned to the group and that there is significant variance in combat systems. For instance, in the 62 ship Arleigh Burke Class, there are 42 different configurations of only 8 major C4I systems. Clearly, an interoperability challenge. Configuration variance reduction is one element that will improve maintenance and modernization execution. Providing a stable and predictable FRP length with clear ownership alignment to a particular CSG would alleviate many of these challenges. Maintenance & Modernization

26 26 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Maintenance & Modernization RKC Analysis Commanders Intent – Use a Readiness Kill Chain approach – Analyze the various stages of the end to end process Ship/Submarine Maintenance and Modernization: –NAVSEA lead –Drive Work Package development and Planning effort to be done earlier –Integrate Class Maintenance Plan requirements with Modernization Aircraft Depot Maintenance -NAVAIR lead

27 27 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Spares availability critical to readiness Stagnant/downward trends in key indicators drove action to get right parts on the shelves Outfitting Spares –Additional $51M added to outfitting spares accounts May13; minimal spares backlog –Outfitting spares funding green across Future Year Defense Plan Fleet Shipboard Spares –Significant investments in AEGIS/BMD spares FY10-13 –COSAL updates every 2 months since July 2012 –Additional $21M investment in surface spares end of Fiscal Year 2013 Ship Construction Spares –$14.6M added back to LPD-25 & LHA-6 programs end of Fiscal Year 2013 Surface Spares Wholeness Coordinated Shipboard Allowance List (COSAL) effectiveness improving and expected to continue

28 28 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Inspections 28 INSPECTION PERIOD III Maintenance Basic Integrated Deployment MCMA INSURV MI / MCMA FUTURE: As-Is To-Be = Independent Inspections INSPECTION PERIOD I INSPECTION PERIOD II MI CNO designated USFF as Executive Agent for Fleet Assessment: -Oversee changes to Inspections, Certifications, Assessment and Visits events -Approval authority for new or expanded requirements -Standardize Assessment Criteria -Maximize training value -Develop enduring process for continual review -Lead senior advisory group to CNO on ICAV matters PRESENT: 466 inspections

29 29 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet This diagram approaches inspection and assessment processes in the As is: at top and To be on the bottom of the chart. The curves represent a generic readiness curve and are sub divided horizontally by phase. Our Fleet Action Working Group found that there are 466 different inspections, certifications, assists and visits scattered across the FRP. Some of these are time based, some are conditions based and others are policy or law. Many are, frankly, outdated. Developing an assessment and inspection continuum across the FRP will: Optimize external assessment and inspection events to eliminate redundancy Optimize assessment timing within the FRP Standardize assessment and inspection requirements Standardize expectations to minimize impacts to ships force personnel Develop institutionalized process for continuous adjudication of future inspections within the FRP. Inspections

30 30 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Creating a Smarter INSURV Reduced from 5 days to 3 days –Commences on Tuesday vice Monday to reduce burden on crew Improved Operational Risk Management –Ships do not get underway before 0700 to enhance safety –Ship leadership afforded crew rest through improved scheduling of events and elimination of redundant and out dated requirements Linked to Readiness Events –Accepts TYCOM TSRA PMS data as INSURV data. This makes INSURV even shorter (3 days or less) Analyzes more data over broader period of time –Collects TYCOM mid-cycle assessment data as INSURV data. This increases the amount of data used to identify maintenance and readiness trends (U)

31 31 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet EA For Fleet Assessments PHASE ONE FAWG PHASE TWO TYCOM/SYSCOM REVIEWS PHASE FOUR CENTRAL ICAV AUTHORITY (CICAVA) PHASE THREE FLEET CDR REVIEW PHASE FIVE STEADY STATE DELIVERABLES 1.EA FOR ICAV DESIGNATED – COMPLETE 2.REFINE/CONCUR WITH ICAV CONCEPT - COMPLETE 3.COMMENT/CONCUR WITH ICAV CHANGES – STAKEHOLDERS REVIEWING CHARTER 4.All AIRFOR AND SURFOR ICAVs TIED TO FOUR PHASES IN FRP – COMPLETE 5.AIRFOR AND SURFOR IDENTIFIED ICAVS TO COMBINE - COMPLETE 6.LINKAGE INSTRUCTION DRAFTED AND TESTED ON JET BLAST DEFLECTORS (JBDs) – COMPLETE 7.SUBLANT JOINED FAWG DELIVERABLES 1.AS-IS ICAV LIST – CMP 2.PROPOSED ICAV CHANGES COMPLETE 3.PROPOSED TO-BE STATE COMPLETE 4.ICAV CHARTER DRAFTED 5.RESOURCES DELIVERABLES 1.DRAFT AND SIGN ICAV INSTRUCTION 2.ASSUME DUTIES FROM FAWG 3.PRIORITIZE ICAV CHANGES 4.DEVELOP ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY 5.SURFACE SHIP INSURV INSPECTIONS REDUCED TO 3.5 DAYS – APR 2014 DELIVERABLES 1.CICAVA ACTS AS THE GATEKEEPER TO SYNCHRONIZE ALL ICAV EVENTS 2.CICAVA EXTENDS PROCESS TO OTHER FRP- DRIVEN ENTITIES DELIVERABLES 1.SIGN CHARTER – TYCOMS HAVE REVIEWED WITH ONLY MINOR CHANGES 2.DESIGNATE CICAVA – CONTAINED WITHIN CHARTER 3.STANDUP CICAVA 4.RESOURCE CICAVA 5.INSURV MESSAGE 6.INSURV HAS ACTION TO LEAD LINKAGE ESTABLISHMENT BETWEEN TYCOM AND INSURV INSPECTIONS IPR 25 SEP OCT 13 ECD 14 FEB 14 ECD 1 OCT 14 CICAVA MAKES CHANGES DELETE, MOVE CONSOLIDATE, AND OPTIMIZE ICAV EVENTS (MOVE FROM AS-IS TO TO-BE) DELIVERABLES BLUE – COMPLETED RED – NOT COMPLETED 17 JAN 14

32 32 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet O-FRP Training Carrier, air-wing, and all surface combatants training aligned ALL units trained to one standard People and equipment ready for training at the end of maintenance Basic unit training –Retains training time entitlement –Integrates inspection, certification, and continuous maintenance requirements Advanced unit and integrated group training –Standardized Group Sail –More efficient training schedule –Standardized training Fleet-wide Synthetic CVW FALLON Live CVW CRUDES CVN Academic Group Sail TSTA / FEP 14 Weeks TSTA WCC A-A ARP CVN TIER 1 - Mobility READ-6 / CMAV TIER 2 - Unit Tactical A-G ARP CVW CRUDES Non Skid 24 Weeks TYCOM Tasking

33 33 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Operational Level to Tactical Level Headquarter Alignment Aligned and standardized Navy warfighting staffs from operational to tactical level –Functions based on Mission Essential Tasks aligned from Combatant to Tactical Commander –Personnel assigned with right skill sets to meet HQ fit –Interoperable systems between Operational and Tactical Level HQ –Standardized and codified staff training and exercise program Optimized – Fleet Response Plan will provide aligned and standardized Operational and Tactical Level Headquarters NCC Combatant Commander CSG, CVW, DESRON, PHIBRON Standardization Alignment CTFCTG

34 34 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Both tactical and operational (TL / OL) staffs have 2 main focus areas: Support commanders decision cycle, and assure subordinate success Key elements in the kill chain are Tactical and Operational Level staffs. TL HQs need to be functionally aligned to OL HQs. Achieving this requires standardized tactical staff academic training. Revised Strike Group Tactical Training Continuum (SGTTC) codifies individual training for tactical staffs. Standardizes training by billet Includes CSG CDR, CVW, DESRON, ESG, PHIBRON, TACRON, Warfare CDRS, and staffs Sets individual requirements for pipeline and Fleet training Headquarters Alignment

35 35 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Lines of Effort Optimized FRP Lines of Effort Foundation to O-FRP CVN/CVW There Now SC w/HST HST HST – IOC MAY 14 HST HST / GHWB / TR by MSG – AUG 13 GHWB – IOC AUG 13 TR – IOC SEP 13 GHWB VIN TR GHWB VIN HST GHWB VIN TR OL/TL HQs (USFF / CPF N7) Advanced Training (USFF / CPF N7 ) Unit Training (TYCOMs) CSG Alignment (USFF / CPF N3) FRP Length (USFF/CPF OPNAV N43) Inspections (USFF/CPF N43) Parts (USFF / CPF N41 OPNAV N8/N9) Maintenance/ Modernization (USFF / CPF N43/N6) Manning/ Individual Training (USFF / OPNAV N1)

36 36 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Starts with maintenance cycle in Nov 14. CRUDES will be aligned by HST CSG FRP start (NOV 2014), pending rework of class maintenance plans by NAVSEA. Inspections begin approximately 1 month prior to Basic training phase Manning is aligned to Basic training phase to gain efficiency in training audience participating in all of work-ups Integrated training occurs in Nov 15 CSG alignment has already started by message in Aug 13 for HST / GHWB / and TR. The first CSG to be aligned for deployment will be GHWB in Feb 14. HST CSG staff will receive pipeline and fleet training for OL/TL alignment in May 14. First O-FRP CSG: TRUMAN

37 37 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet The other CSGs officially enter O-FRP at the maintenance phase: GHWB – May 14, VIN – Jul 15, TR – Dec 15 Where able, we have instituted elements of O-FRP as early as possible. GHWB conducted elements of Integrated training by conducting a new GRP Sail event. TR is conducting increased integrated training b/c of NIFC-CA. CSG alignment for HST / GHWB / TR is de facto complete after the first ADCON shift message in August 13 (CCSGs already briefing their to be units at update briefs) Follow On Carrier Strike Groups

38 38 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Assess EndsWays RESOURCE / POLICY ACCESS / PROCURE PRE- INTRO BASICINTEGRATED MAINT DEPLOY & SUSTAIN FRP 2. O-FRP ……………….. OL/TL HQs…………………………………………………………………………………………. Advanced Training Unit Training………………………………………………………………………………………….... Inspections…………………………………………………………………………………………..…. Parts………………………………………………….. Maintenance……………………………………………………………………………………….….. Manning……………………. CSG Alignment………………………………………………………………………………………… FRP Length………………………. Managing Wholeness Means Personnel Equipment Supplies Training Ordnance Networks Installations Community Industry Elected Leaders Governance / C2 – Drives integration & synchronization vertically across weapons systems & horizontally across the readiness lifecycle 1. Cost to Own.. …… 3. Surge Capacity..... Readiness Kill Chain Navy-Wide Approach to Managing Wholeness It takes everyone to manage Fleet wholeness across the Readiness Kill Chain

39 39 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet Lines of Effort Advanced Training Maintenance/ Modernization Manning/ Individual Training CSG Alignment FRP Length Unit Training Inspections Operational & Tactical HQs Optimized FRP Take Aways Parts Standardize & align NCC, CSG and Warfare CDR training tracks Combine JTFX / C2X; standardize Group Sail; NIFC-CA & EMMW ISIC-led, CSG-wide aggregated training with a predictable schedule Consolidate to specific inspection periods aligned to the FRP RKC methodology to ensure spares are available when needed Stable, predicable, synchronized execution of Maint & Modernization Sea Centric Manning; Incentivize and Retain Quality Sailors C2 aligned with FRP cycle 36 Month Fleetwide introduction begins with TRUMAN CSG in Nov 2014

40 40 United States Fleet Forces United States Pacific Fleet UNCLASSIFIED


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