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US Army Corps of Engineers Everglades Restoration A Program for Integrated Regional Management Garth W. Redfield, Ph.D. Chief Environmental Scientist,

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Presentation on theme: "US Army Corps of Engineers Everglades Restoration A Program for Integrated Regional Management Garth W. Redfield, Ph.D. Chief Environmental Scientist,"— Presentation transcript:

1 US Army Corps of Engineers Everglades Restoration A Program for Integrated Regional Management Garth W. Redfield, Ph.D. Chief Environmental Scientist, South Florida Water Management District Garth W. Redfield, Ph.D. Chief Environmental Scientist, South Florida Water Management District

2 Greater Everglades Ecosystem Orlando Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Miami Kissimmee River Lake Okeechobee Caloosahatchee River and Estuary Big Cypress National Preserve Everglades National Park Water Conservation Areas St. Lucie River and Estuary Biscayne Bay National Park

3 The Everglades Ecosystem

4 Historical Problems Leading to Construction of C&SF Project Areas Flooded in 1947 Areas Flooded in 1926 & 1928 Hurricanes in 1926 and 1928 resulted in failure of the levee around Lake Okeechobee Hurricane in 1947 resulted in wide-spread flooding throughout South Florida State of Florida requested Federal assistance in 1947 Congress authorized the C&SF Project in 1948

5 Central & Southern Florida Project nRiver Channelization nHerbert Hoover Dike nWater Conservation Areas nProtective Levees –Everglades Agricultural Area –Lower East Coast nDrainage Network –Salinity Structures

6 Central and Southern Florida Project 2,800 kilometers of canals and levees 160 major drainage basins Over 2,000 water control structures 200 major structures 36 pump stations 2,800 kilometers of canals and levees 160 major drainage basins Over 2,000 water control structures 200 major structures 36 pump stations

7 C&SF Project Infrastructure One of the worlds largest and most complex water resource management systems

8 HistoricFlow CurrentFlow System Modifications

9 Everglades Restoration & Water Management Challenges Climate is subtropical with extremes Regional system stressed by population & land use Must balance: Multiple water resource objectives Objectives often conflict Climate is subtropical with extremes Regional system stressed by population & land use Must balance: Multiple water resource objectives Objectives often conflict

10 An Ecosystem in Trouble…. Too much or too little water for the South Florida ecosystem 6.4 million cubic meters of water per day is lost to the ocean Declining estuary health Massive reductions in wading bird populations Degradation of water quality Loss of native habitat to invasive exotic vegetation 70 Federally-listed threatened and endangered species Too much or too little water for the South Florida ecosystem 6.4 million cubic meters of water per day is lost to the ocean Declining estuary health Massive reductions in wading bird populations Degradation of water quality Loss of native habitat to invasive exotic vegetation 70 Federally-listed threatened and endangered species

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12 Half of the Everglades Lost to Urban and Agricultural Development

13 C&SF Project Comprehensive Review Study Study authorized by Congress in the Water Resources Development Act of 1992 Study was initiated in June 1993 Purpose of Study is to reexamine the C&SF Project to: Restore South Florida ecosystem Enhance water supplies Maintain flood control Study authorized by Congress in the Water Resources Development Act of 1992 Study was initiated in June 1993 Purpose of Study is to reexamine the C&SF Project to: Restore South Florida ecosystem Enhance water supplies Maintain flood control

14 Interagency Team U.S. Army Corps of Engineers South Florida Water Management District Federal agencies State agencies Miccosukee and Seminole Tribes Local governments U.S. Army Corps of Engineers South Florida Water Management District Federal agencies State agencies Miccosukee and Seminole Tribes Local governments

15 Rescuing an Endangered Ecosystem: The Plan to Restore Americas Everglades July 1999 The Central and Southern Florida Project Comprehensive Review Study (The Restudy) Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan On July 1, 1999, the Secretary of the Army and the State of Florida presented the Plan to Congress

16 Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Plan includes 68 components to be implemented over 35 years.

17 QualityQuantity TimingDistribution Getting the Water Right: A Rational Premise or Risky Assumption A Rational Premise or Risky Assumption

18 Balancing Water Needs of the Ecosystem

19 70% 30% Environment Urban & Agricultural Current Deliveries 1.5 Billion Cubic Meters per year Deliveries with CERP 3 Billion Cubic Meters per year 50% Urban & Agricultural Environment Primary Goal - Increase the Amount of Available Water

20 Wetlands Restoration

21 Wetland Restoration Wetland Restoration Orlando Florida Keys Florida Bay Big Cypress National Preserve Everglades National Park Lake Okeechobee Ft. Myers Water Conservation Areas Biscayne Bay Miami Fort Lauderdale West Palm Beach Kissimmee River Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Program 185,000 acres (75,000 hectares)

22 Surface Water Storage Reservoirs

23 15 Surface Water Storage Reservoirs Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Total Storage Capacity: 1.8 billion cubic meters

24 Aquifer Storage and Recovery: A Challenging Approach

25 Aquifer Storage and Recovery Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan l 330 ASR Wells Possible l 3 Pilot Projects in progress l 10 wells being installed in the L.O. watershed Total ASR Capacity: 6 million cubic meters per day

26 Seepage Management Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan

27 Stormwater Treatment Areas

28 Orlando Florida Keys Florida Bay Big Cypress National Preserve Everglades National Park Lake Okeechobee Ft. Myers Water Conservation Areas Biscayne Bay Miami Fort Lauderdale West Palm Beach Kissimmee River Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan 22 Treatment Areas 18,000 hectares of wetlands

29 Removing Barriers to Sheet Flow Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan

30 $$$ Project Cost Sharing Project Cost Sharing Estimated Cost $10.9 billion over 35 years to implement (2004 dollars) More than $170 million per year to operate and maintain $10 million per year for monitoring and adaptive assessment Cost sharing depends on federal authorization process $10.9 billion over 35 years to implement (2004 dollars) More than $170 million per year to operate and maintain $10 million per year for monitoring and adaptive assessment Cost sharing depends on federal authorization process 50% Federal $ 50% State

31 WRDA-2000 Provisions Assurance of Project Benefits Reservation of water for the natural system Savings Clause No elimination of existing legal sources No reduction in the level of service for flood protection Reservation of water for the natural system Savings Clause No elimination of existing legal sources No reduction in the level of service for flood protection January 9, 2002

32 Acceler8 Program An Interagency Commitment State of Florida commits to fund a $1.6 Billion accelerated restoration effort The Federal government agrees to expedite their planning and permitting decisions Oct 14, 2004

33 Acceler8 Program Early Restoration Benefits To be Constructed by 2010: Over 500 million cubic meters of reservoir storage capacity Over 11,000 hectares of Stormwater Treatment Areas Over 35,000 hectares of natural areas restoration To be Constructed by 2010: Over 500 million cubic meters of reservoir storage capacity Over 11,000 hectares of Stormwater Treatment Areas Over 35,000 hectares of natural areas restoration

34 Everglades Agricultural Area Storage Reservoir Current (2005) Future (2010)

35 Everglades Restoration: Peer Review (CISRERP) National Academy of Sciences, first biennial review, 2006 concludes: There are successes - Kissimmee Restoration has worked Water quality programs are effective Science is progressing – MAP is ready for implementation Good adaptive management strategy National Academy of Sciences, first biennial review, 2006 concludes: There are successes - Kissimmee Restoration has worked Water quality programs are effective Science is progressing – MAP is ready for implementation Good adaptive management strategy

36 Everglades Restoration: Peer Review (CISRERP) National Academy of Sciences, first biennial review, 2006 concludes: CERP Project Status – Key projects have been delayed More federal funding is needed Improve project planning and funding Use an Incremental Adaptive Restoration approach to initiating and evaluating projects with large uncertainties National Academy of Sciences, first biennial review, 2006 concludes: CERP Project Status – Key projects have been delayed More federal funding is needed Improve project planning and funding Use an Incremental Adaptive Restoration approach to initiating and evaluating projects with large uncertainties

37 Everglades Restoration: Obstacles & Opportunities Obstacles: Massive Scale of Effort; Land Acquisition Funding; Interagency Cooperation Technical Limitations Opportunities: Restore Valued Regional Resources Provide Sustainable Balance of Management Objectives Contribute Information for Large-Scale Restoration Projects Worldwide Obstacles: Massive Scale of Effort; Land Acquisition Funding; Interagency Cooperation Technical Limitations Opportunities: Restore Valued Regional Resources Provide Sustainable Balance of Management Objectives Contribute Information for Large-Scale Restoration Projects Worldwide

38 www.evergladesplan.org www.evergladesnow.org For more information, visit our Websites

39 Questions ? Thank you


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