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3 – Things you remember about Canada after the war 2 – Two reasons why you think the 1920s were Roaring? 1 – Thing you want to learn in the 20s MINDS ON.

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Presentation on theme: "3 – Things you remember about Canada after the war 2 – Two reasons why you think the 1920s were Roaring? 1 – Thing you want to learn in the 20s MINDS ON."— Presentation transcript:

1 3 – Things you remember about Canada after the war 2 – Two reasons why you think the 1920s were Roaring? 1 – Thing you want to learn in the 20s MINDS ON – ANTICIPATION

2 Prohibition Terms and Pictures THE JAZZ AGE OF THE 1920S

3 CHANGING SOCIAL ATTITUDES The 1920s were years of contrasts, conflict, and change Womens Christian Temperance Union lobbied to ban gambling, drinking, theatre attendance, and public dancing Down the street, young people would be drinking and dancing to the wild new sounds of jazz

4 Jazz was the most popular style of music, moving from the American South to Canada It coincided with the rise of the radio, which introduced news, fads, music and shows to North America THE JAZZ AGE

5 It also showed that Americanization was in full swing and Canadians were looking south for the new styles

6 Was when the sale, manufacturing and transportation of alcohol was illegal Also known as The Volstead Act in the US, and was in effect from Different provinces in Canada ended it at different times in the 1920s PROHIBITION

7 Speakeasy was a nickname for a private bar, they were also referred to as Blind Tigers or Blind Pigs The term comes from being able to order alcohol without raising suspicion - a bartender would tell a patron to be quiet and "speak easy SPEAKEASY

8 Nickname for a young woman in the 1920s Defined by the bob haircut and short dresses Often seen drinking and smoking in public, which was previously unheard of for women FLAPPER

9 Sometimes involved with the shadier side of organized crime Represented open and liberal attitudes, and offered a new sense of freedom for women Later became part of the mainstream

10 Usually private, and almost always affiliated with organized crime. You would need to be invited, know the secret password, etc Police often raided them, but would take bribes to stay away or warn the owner

11 The unofficial mayor of Chicago Leader of organized crime in the US Had connections to Canada through Moosejaw, Sask. AL CAPONE

12 Was the original Scarface Was eventually arrested by Eliot Ness from the US Treasury Dept for tax evasion

13 Bootlegging was illegally making and selling alcohol It was the biggest business for organized crime Rum-running was smuggling booze across the border into the US (Canada provided whiskey, Mexico provided tequila and rum) Check out this video!! BOOTLEGGING AND RUM-RUNNING


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