Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports & Response-to-Intervention George Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS Center for Behavioral Education & Research University.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports & Response-to-Intervention George Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS Center for Behavioral Education & Research University."— Presentation transcript:

1 Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports & Response-to-Intervention George Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS Center for Behavioral Education & Research University of Connecticut June

2 PURPOSE Examination of current SWPBS data practices, systems, & outcomes in context of responsiveness-to- intervention Keynote overview: All Follow-up: Administrators, coordinators, coaches, trainers, evaluators Coaching: Administrators, coordinators, coaches, trainers, evaluators Brief History & Rationale PBIS Foundations RtI Data

3 Problem Statement We give schools strategies & systems for improving practice & outcomes, but implementation is not accurate, consistent, or durable, & desired outcomes arent realized. School personnel & teams need more than exposure, practice, & enthusiasm.

4 Brief PBIS History & Rationale

5 Context Matters! Examples Individual Student vs. School-wide

6 Assessments indicate that Reiko performs in average to above average range in most academic areas. However, in last 4 weeks her teacher has noticed Reikos frequent talking & asking & answering questions without raising her hand has become an annoying problem to other students & to teacher. Reiko What would you do?

7 Kiyoshi is a highly competent student, but has long history of antisocial behavior. He is quick to anger, & minor events quickly escalate to major confrontations. He has few friends, & most of his conflicts occur with peers in hallways & cafeteria & on bus. In last 2 months, he has been given 8 days of in school detention & 6 days of out of school suspension. In a recent event, he broke glasses of another student. Kiyoshi What would you do?

8 Mitch displays a number of stereotypic (e.g., light filtering with his fingers, head rolling) & self-injurious behaviors (e.g., face slapping, arm biting), & his communications are limited to a verbal vocabulary of about 25 words. When his usual routines are changed or items are not in their usual places, his rates of stereotypic & self-injurious behavior increase quickly. Mitch What would you do?

9 Rachel dresses in black every day, rarely interacts with teachers or other students, & writes & distributes poems & stories about witchcraft, alien nations, gundams, & other science fiction topics. When approached or confronted by teachers, she pulls hood of her black sweatshirt or coat over her head & walks away. Mystified by Rachels behavior, teachers usually shake their heads & let her walk away. Recently, Rachel carefully wrapped a dead squirrel in black cloth & placed it on her desk. Other students became frightened when she began talking to it. Rachel What would you do?

10 Fortunately, we have a science that guides us to… Crone & Horner, 2003; Horner, Sugai, & Anderson, 2007 Context Matters!

11 Intermediate/senior high school with 880 students reported over 5,100 office discipline referrals in one academic year. Nearly 2/3 of students have received at least one office discipline referral. 159 Days Reiko is in this school!

12

13 During 4 th period, in-school detention room has so many students that the overflow is sent to the counselors office. Most students have been assigned for being in the hallways after the late bell. Da place to be Kiyoshi is in this school!

14 During Advisory Class, thesportsters sit in the back of the room, & goths sit at the front. Most class activities result in out of seat, yelling arguments between the two groups. Cliques Mitch is in this school!

15 Three rival gangs are competing for four corners. Teachers actively avoid the area. Because of daily conflicts, vice principal has moved her desk to four corners. 4 Corners Rachel is in this school!

16

17 Big Ideas from Early Years

18 Early Triangle (p. 201) Walker, Knitzer, Reid, et al., CDC

19 Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior ~80% of Students ~15% ~5% CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL & POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT ALL SOME FEW

20 Redesign of teaching environments…not students

21 SWPBS (aka PBIS/RtI) is Framework

22 Guskey, 1986, p. 59

23 SYSTEMS PRACTICES DATA Supporting Staff Behavior Supporting Student Behavior OUTCOMES Supporting Social Competence & Academic Achievement Supporting Decision Making Integrated Elements

24 All Some Few Continuum of Support for ALL Dec 7, 2007

25 Continuum of Support for ALL Theora Dec 7, 2007 Science Soc Studies Reading Math Soc skills Basketball Spanish Label behavior…not people

26 Continuum of Support for ALL: Molcom Dec 7, 2007 Prob Sol. Coop play Adult rel. Anger man. Attend. Peer interac Ind. play Label behavior…not people Self-assess

27 Response-to-Intervention

28

29 RtI

30

31 K-1 (same): Phonemic Segmentation Fluency

32 Responsiveness to Intervention

33 Implementation Framework

34 Bradshaw, C.P., Koth, C.W., Thornton, L.A., & Leaf, P.J. (2009). Altering school climate through school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports: Findings from a group-randomized effectiveness trial. Prevention Science, 10(2), Bradshaw, C.P., Koth, C.W., Bevans, K.B., Ialongo, N., & Leaf, P.J. (2008). The impact of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) on the organizational health of elementary schools. School Psychology Quarterly, 23(4), Bradshaw, C. P., Mitchell, M. M., & Leaf, P. J. (2010). Examining the effects of School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports on student outcomes: Results from a randomized controlled effectiveness trial in elementary schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 12, Bradshaw, C.P., Reinke, W. M., Brown, L. D., Bevans, K.B., & Leaf, P.J. (2008). Implementation of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) in elementary schools: Observations from a randomized trial. Education & Treatment of Children, 31, Horner, R., Sugai, G., Smolkowski, K., Eber, L., Nakasato, J., Todd, A., & Esperanza, J., (2009). A randomized, wait-list controlled effectiveness trial assessing school-wide positive behavior support in elementary schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 11, Horner, R. H., Sugai, G., & Anderson, C. M. (2010). Examining the evidence base for school-wide positive behavior support. Focus on Exceptionality, 42(8), RCT & Group Design PBIS Studies Reduced major disciplinary infractions Improvements in academic achievement Enhanced perception of organizational health & safety Improved school climate Reductions in teacher reported bullying behavior

35 Making a turn IMPLEMENTATION EffectiveNot Effective PRACTICE Effective Not Effective Maximum Student Benefits Fixsen & Blase, 2009

36 Detrich, Keyworth, & States (2007). J. Evid.-based Prac. in Sch. Start w/ What Works Focus on Fidelity

37 SWPBS Implementation Blueprint

38 SYSTEMS PRACTICES DATA Supporting Staff Behavior Supporting Student Behavior OUTCOMES Supporting Social Competence & Academic Achievement Supporting Decision Making Integrated Elements

39 Classroom SWPBS Practices Non-classroom Family Student School-wide Smallest # Evidence-based Biggest, durable effect

40 SCHOOL-WIDE 1.1. Leadership team 2.Behavior purpose statement 3.Set of positive expectations & behaviors 4.Procedures for teaching SW & classroom-wide expected behavior 5.Continuum of procedures for encouraging expected behavior 6.Continuum of procedures for discouraging rule violations 7.Procedures for on-going data-based monitoring & evaluation EVIDENCE- BASED INTERVENTION PRACTICES CLASSROOM 1.All school-wide 2.Maximum structure & predictability in routines & environment 3.Positively stated expectations posted, taught, reviewed, prompted, & supervised. 4.Maximum engagement through high rates of opportunities to respond, delivery of evidence- based instructional curriculum & practices 5.Continuum of strategies to acknowledge displays of appropriate behavior. 6.Continuum of strategies for responding to inappropriate behavior. INDIVIDUAL STUDENT 1.Behavioral competence at school & district levels 2.Function-based behavior support planning 3.Team- & data-based decision making 4.Comprehensive person-centered planning & wraparound processes 5.Targeted social skills & self-management instruction 6. Individualized instructional & curricular accommodations NONCLASSROOM 1.Positive expectations & routines taught & encouraged 2.Active supervision by all staff (Scan, move, interact) 3.Precorrections & reminders 4.Positive reinforcement FAMILY ENGAGEMENT 1.Continuum of positive behavior support for all families 2.Frequent, regular positive contacts, communications, & acknowledgements 3.Formal & active participation & involvement as equal partner 4.Access to system of integrated school & community resources

41 1-5% 5-10% 80-90% Intensive, Individual Interventions Individual Students Assessment-based High Intensity Intensive, Individual Interventions Individual Students Assessment-based Intense, durable procedures Targeted Group Interventions Some students (at-risk) High efficiency Rapid response Targeted Group Interventions Some students (at-risk) High efficiency Rapid response Universal Interventions All students Preventive, proactive Universal Interventions All settings, all students Preventive, proactive Responsiveness to Intervention Academic SystemsBehavioral Systems Circa 1996

42 ~80% of Students ~5% ESTABLISHING CONTINUUM of SWPBS SECONDARY PREVENTION Check in/out Targeted social skills instruction Peer-based supports Social skills club TERTIARY PREVENTION Function-based support Wraparound Person-centered planning PRIMARY PREVENTION Teach SW expectations Proactive SW discipline Positive reinforcement Effective instruction Parent engagement SECONDARY PREVENTION TERTIARY PREVENTION PRIMARY PREVENTION ~15%


Download ppt "Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports & Response-to-Intervention George Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS Center for Behavioral Education & Research University."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google