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Native Americans By Kim OHehir. Introduction Native American Clothing True Or False Native American History Native American Food Native American Myths.

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Presentation on theme: "Native Americans By Kim OHehir. Introduction Native American Clothing True Or False Native American History Native American Food Native American Myths."— Presentation transcript:

1 Native Americans By Kim OHehir

2 Introduction Native American Clothing True Or False Native American History Native American Food Native American Myths And Legends Native Americans Today

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4 I really enjoyed doing my project on Native Americans and hope you will learn as much as I did from it!

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6 Originally, there were many different traditional clothing styles in North America. Nearly every Native American tribe had its own distinctive style of dress, and the people could often tell each other's tribal identities by looking at their clothes and headdresses.

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8 Men and Women clothing Men In most tribes, Native American men wore breechcloths sometimes with leather leggings attached in colder climates. In other tribes Indian men wore a kilt or fur trousers instead of a breechcloth. Plains Indian warriors wore special buckskin war shirts decorated with ermine tail Woman Most Native American women wore skirts and leggings. In some Indian cultures women's shirts were optional and were usually treated more like coats, while in others, women always wore tunics in public. And in other tribes women usually wore dresses.

9 Breechcloth

10 War shirt

11 Dress

12 Tunic

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14 1. Indians are not full citizens of the United States. (TRUE) or (FALSE) 2. Because of poor educational opportunities, Indians have made no important achievements. (TRUE) or (FALSE) 4. Indian people have been around approximately 20,000 years. (TRUE) or (FALSE) 5. Indians were excellent horsemen even before the coming of the white man. (TRUE) or (FALSE)

15 1. Indians are not full citizens of the United States. (TRUE) or (FALSE) True 2. Because of poor educational opportunities, Indians have made no important achievements. (TRUE) or (FALSE) False 4. Indian people have been around approximately 20,000 years. (TRUE) or (FALSE) True 5. Indians were excellent horsemen even before the coming of the white man. (TRUE) or (FALSE) True

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17 The History of Native Americans is both fascinating and tragic. They had lived in the land many, many years before white man set foot on their soil. It is believed that during the ice age, they traveled into what is now Alaska. The name Indian was given them by Christopher Columbus who mistakenly believed he had landed in the Indies. They have been labeled Indians, American Indians, and the now preferred Native Americans. They believed in respecting the land. They became proficient fishermen, hunters, farmed crops such as corn, and built homes with whatever available resources their territory provided. Some of these included animal skins, sun-dried brick. Native American History

18 There is a number of Native American tribes all over America.

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21 There were not many domesticated animals in North America before Europeans arrived-- only turkeys, ducks, and dogs, and most tribes did not eat dog meat (although some did.) In South America, llamas and guinea pigs were also raised by some tribes for their meat. Some Native Americans were primarily big animal hunters. In tribes like these, large groups of Native Americans usually worked together to drive large animals into an ambush, a man-made pit, or over a cliff, sometimes setting controlled fires or building fences to cut off their escape. In fishing tribes, Native American fishermen would either catch fish and hunt from their canoes, or else set fish nets and wooden traps for them. Native hunting and fishing weapons varied from tribe to tribe but the most common ones were bows and arrows, spears, harpoons, fish-hooks, and blowguns.

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23 There are hundreds of old Native American myths and legends told as a lesson or some just for entertainment. Here is one as an example....

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25 Once upon a time, a long time ago, the Everything-Maker was very busy, making all the animals and all the plants and all the rocks and caverns and everything else that covered the earth. Wise Owl Owl waited for his turn. He had been given a voice, two eyes, a head, a body, and strong wings. "I want a long neck like Swan," Owl told the Everything-Maker. "I want red feathers like Cardinal and a beak like Hawk."

26 "Yes, yes," mumbled the Everything-Maker. Whatever you want. But you must wait your turn." The Everything-Maker looked sharply at Owl. Wise Owl "Your eyes are open again. You know that no one is allowed to watch me work. Turn around and close your eyes. I have no time for you now. I am busy creating Rabbit."

27 The Everything-Maker turned his attention back to Rabbit who was shaking with nervousness. "And what do you want, little rabbit?" the Everything-Maker asked encouragingly. "Long legs and ears," Rabbit spoke softly. "And fangs. Could I have a Wise Owl fang or two? And claws. I would dearly love to have claws!"

28 The Everything-Maker smiled. "I think we could manage some claws and fangs." He smoothed Rabbit's long legs and ears. "Silly Rabbit!" Owl hooted loudly. "Why don't you ask for something useful, like wisdom? "This is your last warning, Owl, frowned the Everything-Maker. Be quiet and wait your turn." Wise Owl

29 Owl glared at the Everything-Maker. "You have to do it," he hooted. "You have to give us what we ask. I demand wisdom!" Wise Owl "I warned you, Owl!" shouted the Everything-Maker. He shoved Owl's head down into his body, which made Owl's neck disappear. He gave Owl a shake, which made Owl's eyes widen in fright. He pulled Owl's ears until they stuck out from his head.

30 The Everything-Maker snapped, "Ive made your ears big, the better to listen and your eyes big, the better to see. I have made your neck short, the better to hold up your head. Ive packed your head with wisdom. Now, use your wisdom and fly away before you lose what Ive given." Wise Owl Owl was no longer a fool. He flew quickly away, pouting and hooting.

31 The Everything-Maker turned back to Rabbit, smiling gently. "Claws," he reminded himself. But Rabbit was gone. Rabbit had hopped hurriedly away, too afraid of the Everything-Maker to stay for his fangs and claws. Wise Owl

32 Owl knew if he angered the Everything-Maker again, he would lose all that he had gained. Even today, Owl only comes out at night, when the Everything-Maker is fast asleep. Wise Owl As for Rabbit, his claws and fangs are waiting. Perhaps someday...

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34 Today, Native Americans pass down their traditions, such as native dances, to their children. This person is wearing traditional dress, but there are clues to tell you that this is a picture from modern times. Can you find some clues?

35 Native Americans have had to fight for their rights to teach their children about the traditions of the tribes, to hunt and fish, and to open new businesses on the reservations. Today, there are schools on the reservations like this one on the Havasupai reservation in Arizona.

36 Here is a picture of Native American children today! P.S. Dont forget Chief Limpy Leg!!!


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