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Rebuilding Communities from the Grassroots Sharon Thornberry Megan Newell-Ching Community Food Systems Manager Community Resource Developer OREGON FOOD.

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Presentation on theme: "Rebuilding Communities from the Grassroots Sharon Thornberry Megan Newell-Ching Community Food Systems Manager Community Resource Developer OREGON FOOD."— Presentation transcript:

1 Rebuilding Communities from the Grassroots Sharon Thornberry Megan Newell-Ching Community Food Systems Manager Community Resource Developer OREGON FOOD BANK

2 Economic Development Farm Viability Farmland Protection Community Viability Food Security Community Food System Distributing Recycling Nutrients Growing Food Preparing Food Eating Retailing Community Advocates Researchers and Educators Technical Service Providers Funders and Lenders Trade Associations Policy Makers Government Agencies Support System What is a Food System? Its the sum of all activities required to make food available to people Adopted from CS Mott Group at MSU

3 Resilience is the opposite of vulnerability. Resilient food systems can withstand political, economic, social and environmental shocks. Resilient individuals, households and communities are less vulnerable to changes in fortune that push others into food insecurity. Resilient Food Systems

4 VISION: We envision communities across Oregon and SW Washington where citizens are empowered and actively engaged across sectors to attain personal and community food security. Three approaches: Community FEAST RARE Community Food Assessment Partnership Food Systems Networking Oregon Food Bank Community Food Systems

5 About the FEAST model FEAST was developed as a response to the need to help communities move to action around community food systems work. These events are organized by a local steering committee and feature local organizations A FEAST convenes a conversation that leads to a self-determined organizing plan for food systems work in the community Currently, OFB staff serve as facilitators, provide suggestions, feedback and support, but do not direct the outcomes.

6 What happens at a ? Stories are shared from the local food system. Themes and solutions from other communities are shared. Food systems issues and solutions are discussed, distilled and sorted to identify priorities. Work groups are established and Organizing Plans created. Community driven FEAST outcomes have included: New farmers markets Increased SNAP & WIC acceptance Expanded community gardens New donors for food banks Additional Nutrition Education opportunities

7 IMPACT 50+ events to date engaging over 1500 people Replicable model- being implemented in 6 states beyond Oregon Shown to increase community connections among participants 30+% of participants are food producers Program nationally recognized by Feeding Americas 2013 Innovation Awards PUBLIC PRIVATE NONPROFIT Emergency Food Agencies Faith-Based Organizations Nutrition Education Programs Farm-to-School Coalitions Gleaners Community Gardens Farmers Markets Farms Food Retailers Health Care Providers Food Processors Fisheries OSU Extension Elected Office Public Health Departments Jobs Offices Schools FEAST engages a broad spectrum of the community to create self-determined organizing plans.

8 OFB-RARE Community Food Assessment Partnership 14 Community Food Assessments (CFA) covering 21 counties (to date) Coordination and facilitation of 21 FEAST events 80+ Rural grocery store surveys 7 Local food resource guides

9 WHY COMMUNITY FOOD ASSESSMENT? Our qualitative approach: Builds community in the process Reflects local food system realities through the lens of the local community Informs grassroots actions in communities, acting as a guide for local organizations For Oregon Food Bank, CFAs have identified: Improvements to local food systems that can be made by current community groups, with existing resources Ways to strengthen emergency food services in Oregons rural communities Policy solutions and other actions that can improve local food systems and reduce food insecurity

10 Complete Current Planned CFA RECOMMENDATIONS COMMON ACROSS REGIONS: Increase Healthy Food Access Promote small & medium size growers Build Food Literacy Community Food Organizing

11 Timeline & Outcomes: Clatsop County 2009: FEAST (September) RARE AmeriCorps member - North Coast Food Guide - Clatsop County Food Assessment 2010: North Coast Food Web (501c3) formed 2011:- North Coast Food Summit -River Peoples Farmers Market launched -Food Talk radio show -Cooking Matters Nutrition Classes -4-H Kids Classes -FoodDay events -Meyer Memorial Trust grant 2012:- 4 new school gardens, Mobile Gardens - Grow the Coast

12 Timeline & Process: Rogue Valley 2011: - MMT Planning Grant 2012: - Coordinator Hired (Jan) - Steering Committee Formed (March) - 5 FEASTs (March-May) - 5 Community Conversations (March-June) - Community Food Assessment Report (Dec) 2013:- Food Summit (March) - MMT Implementation Grant (April) - Rogue Valley Food System Council (July)

13 SNAP in Oregon - March 2013: $105 million+ in SNAP benefits statewide - Each $1 spent in SNAP generates $1.79 in economic activity 2012 WIC Fruit & Veggie Voucher $6.3 million spentin Oregon Farm Direct Nutrition Program 2012 $2 million statewide- WIC & Seniors $ The Bottom Line $

14 Yes Magazine, 2006 Buying Local: Economic Multiplier

15 School children hungry on the weekend Feed them!! Backpack program Quick, simple, focus on child Long term, renewable, family focus Seek community input Community Garden

16 Collective Impact

17 Sharon Thornberry Megan Newell-Ching Community Food Systems Manager Community Resource Developer Phone: Phone: Spencer Masterson Community Resource Developer Phone: Connect With Us on Social Media! https://twitter.com/#!/OFB_SharonT


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