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Junior Leadership Training March 2009 For Scouts beginning a new position of responsibility, you term of service will conclude in September.

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Presentation on theme: "Junior Leadership Training March 2009 For Scouts beginning a new position of responsibility, you term of service will conclude in September."— Presentation transcript:

1 Junior Leadership Training March 2009 For Scouts beginning a new position of responsibility, you term of service will conclude in September.

2 Junior Leader Training Goals To Understand: The troop structure and Chain of Command Your Position of Responsibility (POR) in the troop To understand the role of the Patrol Method The role of the Patrol Leaders Council The method of dealing with misbehavior by scouts To continue to establish certain rituals (the way we always to certain things so everyone always knows what is expected.

3 Troop Chain of Command Review: Describe how the chain of command works up and down Discuss how to handle questions (If you are asked a question by a member of your patrol, you go up the chain to get the answer, not send him.) Discuss how to handle an out of chain order (Thank- you for your comments, Joes Dad, my patrol leader has instructed me to wash these dishes this way. May I suggest that you speak with our Scoutmaster) Why no one person can be responsible for every person (the best management is in small groups of 6-8 hence the patrol size)

4 Troop 732 Organizational Chart

5 The Scoutmaster The Scoutmaster is the adult leader responsible for the image and program of the troop. The Scoutmaster and his assistant Scoutmasters work directly with the Scouts. The importance of the Scoutmaster's job is reflected in the fact that the quality of his guidance will affect every youth and adult involved in the troop. The Scoutmaster is in charge of: – Troop Program – Assistant Scoutmasters – Image of the Troop – Reports to and From the Troop Committee for the scouts – Works with the Senior Patrol Leader to provide Training and Guidance for the other Junior Leaders – Conduct Scoutmaster conferences for all rank advancements – Delegate responsibility to other adults and groups (assistants, troop committee) so that they have a real part in troop operations. – Supervise troop elections for the Order of the Arrow – Make it possible for each Scout to experience at least 10 days and nights of camping each year.

6 Scoutmasters Rules The Scoutmaster is to be invited to all PLC Meetings. The Scoutmaster is to be consulted on all major decisions by the Senior Patrol Leader or the Patrol Leaders Council. The Scoutmaster is to be kept in the loop in routine communications and decisions by other Junior Leadership. The Scoutmaster is the primary conduit for information between the Patrol Leaders Council and the Troop Committee.

7 Leadership Cards Our troop is developing Leadership cards to help each Junior Leader understand their job within the troop. Use this card to help remind you of your responsibilities within the troop. Have the Scoutmaster sign-off on this card when your term of service concludes so that you can receive credit for you work!

8 Senior Patrol Leader Job Description: The Senior Patrol Leader is elected by the scouts to represent them as a top junior leader in the troop. Prerequisites: Star, Life or Eagle rank, previously served and completed the position of Patrol Leader or Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, or has approval of Scoutmaster based on other outstanding leadership abilities. Leadership Position Coordinator: Scoutmaster Duties of Senior Patrol Leader: Runs all troop meetings, events, and the annual program planning conference Runs the Patrol Leaders Council meetings (PLC) Appoints other troop junior leaders with advice and counsel of the Scoutmaster Coordinates duties and responsibilities to junior leaders Assists the scoutmaster with junior leader training Coordinates campout duty roster and ensures execution of duties Delegates his responsibilities to the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (ASPL) in his absence Sets a good example Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly Lives the Scout Oath and Law Shows Scout Spirit

9 Assistant Senior Patrol Leader Job Description: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader is the second-highest-ranking junior leader in the troop. The Senior Patrol Leader, with the approval of the Scoutmaster, appoints him. The assistant senior patrol leader acts as the senior patrol leader in the absence of the senior patrol leader or when called upon. Prerequisites: Preferably, former Patrol Leader or other standing positions on the PLC, with the Scoutmasters approval. Leadership Position Coordinator: The Senior Patrol Leader Position Back-up: 2 nd ASPL or Advanced Patrols Patrol Leader Duties of Assistant Senior Patrol Leader: Helps senior patrol leader lead meetings and activities. Runs the troop in the absence of the senior patrol leader. Helps train and supervise the Bugler, Chaplain's Aide, Historian, Instructor, Librarian, Order of the Arrow Troop Representative, Quartermaster, Scribe, and Troop Guides.BuglerChaplain's AideHistorianInstructorLibrarianQuartermaster,ScribeTroop Guide Serves as a member of the patrol leaders council Sets a good example Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly Lives the Scout Oath and Law Shows Scout Spirit

10 Patrol Leader Job Description: The Patrol Leader is the elected leader of his patrol. He represents his patrol on the patrol leaders council. Leadership Position Coordinator: Senior Patrol Leader, Scoutmaster Position Back-up: Assistant Patrol Leader Duties of Senior Patrol Leader: Appoints the assistant patrol leader Represents the patrol on the patrol leaders council Plans and steers patrol meetings Helps Scouts advance Acts as the chief recruiter of new Scouts Keeps patrol members informed Knows what his patrol members and other leaders can do Sets a good example Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly Lives the Scout Oath and Law Shows Scout Spirit

11 Patrol Leader (Eagle Patrol) The Senior Patrol is unique from the other patrols as they do not operate as much as a traditional patrol as they do as roles models. The members of this patrol are Life Scouts working toward their Eagle Projects. They primarily serve as Troop Guides and Instructors for the other scouts and patrols. Job Description: The Patrol Leader of the Senior Patrol is the elected leader of his patrol. He represents his patrol on the patrol leaders council and serves as a role model for the younger patrol leaders. Leadership Position Coordinator: Senior Patrol Leader, Scoutmaster Position Back-up: Designated Assistant Patrol Leader Duties of Patrol Leader (Senior Patrol) Appoints the assistant patrol leader Represents the patrol on the patrol leaders council Plans and steers patrol meetings Keeps patrol members informed Sets a good example Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly Lives the Scout Oath and Law Shows Scout Spirit

12 Troop Scribe Job Description: The scribe keeps the Troop records. He records the activities of the patrol leaders council and keeps a record of dues, advancement and Scout attendance at troop meetings. Leadership Position Coordinator: Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Scoutmaster Duties of Troop Scribe: Distributes meeting/campout/activity attendance sheets to patrol leaders Collects attendance sheets from patrol leaders, verifies information with ASPL/AJSM, and turns record into Troop Attendance Coordinator Secures account update report from Troop treasurer for each scout initial account balance Will serve as official note taker for PLC meetings Records individual Scout attendance at all troop meetings and outings Works with troop committee member responsible for records Sets a good example Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly Lives the Scout Oath and Law Shows Scout Spirit

13 Troop Historian Job Description: Troop Historian keeps historical records, photos or a scrapbook of troop activities. Leadership Position Coordinator: Scoutmaster, or designated alternate. Position Back-up: Designated alternate by SPL or Scoutmaster Duties of Troop Historian: Assists Position Coordinator in serving as Troop Photo Archivist Solicits pictures of troop events from adults/scouts Collects digital files of photos from troop events and archives them on a catalog of CDs Forwards digital files and/or CDs to Troop Webmaster for use on Troop website Sets a good example Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly Lives the Scout Oath and Law Shows Scout Spirit

14 Troop Librarian Job Description: The librarian takes care of troop literature. Leadership Position Coordinator: Assistant Senior Patrol Leader Position Back-up: Designated alternate by SPL or Scoutmaster Duties of Senior Troop Librarian: Sets up and takes care of the troop library Keeps records of books and pamphlets owned by the troop Adds new or replacement items as needed Keeps books and pamphlets available for borrowing Keeps a system for checking books and pamphlets in and out Follows up on late returns Sets a good example Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly Lives the Scout Oath and Law Shows Scout Spirit

15 Quartermaster Job Description: The troop quartermaster keeps track of patrol equipment and sees that it is in good working condition. Leadership Position Coordinator: Adult Quartermaster Coordinator Position Back-up: Designated alternate by SPL or Scoutmaster Duties of Troop Quartermaster: Keeps records on troop equipment Submits monthly tent inventory records from patrols to adult troop quartermaster Makes sure equipment is in good working condition and assists adult quartermaster in repairs Issues equipment to patrol quartermasters and makes sure it is returned in good working condition Makes suggestions to adult quartermaster for new or replacement items Works with the patrol quartermasters and adult quartermaster Sets a good example Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly Lives the Scout Oath and Law Shows Scout Spirit

16 Food Steward Job Description: The troop Food Steward keeps track of food stores for the troop and makes sure that sundries (hand soap, garbage bags etc.) are in good supply for each event. Leadership Position Coordinator: Assistant Senior Patrol Leader & Adult Food Steward Position Back-up: Designated alternate by SPL or Scoutmaster Duties of Troop Quartermaster: Keeps records on troop food supplies and sundries Submits monthly inventory records Works with the patrols in meal planning Sets a good example Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly Lives the Scout Oath and Law Shows Scout Spirit

17 Chaplains Aide Job Description: The chaplain aide works with the troop chaplain, or Scoutmaster to meet the religious needs of Scouts in the troop. He also works to promote the religious emblems program. Leadership Position Coordinator: Troop Chaplain, ASPL, Scoutmaster Position Back-up: Designated alternate by SPL or Scoutmaster Duties of Chaplain Aide: Assists the troop chaplain with religious services at troop activities Tells Scouts about the religious emblem program for their faith Makes sure religious holidays are considered during troop program planning Helps plan for religious observance in troop activities Maintains prayer cards for troop outings Sets a good example Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly Lives the Scout Oath and Law Shows Scout Spirit

18 Junior Assistant Scoutmaster Job Description: The junior assistant Scoutmaster serves in the capacity of an assistant Scoutmaster except where legal age and maturity are required. He should be at least 16 years old and not yet 18 years old. The Scoutmaster appoints him because of his leadership ability. Leadership Position Coordinator: Scoutmaster Duties of Junior Assistant Scoutmaster: Functions as an assistant Scoutmaster Performs duties as assigned by the Scoutmaster Sets a good example Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly Lives the Scout Oath and Law Shows Scout Spirit

19 Troop Guide (New Patrol) Job Description: The Troop Guide works with new scouts. He helps them feel comfortable and earn their First Class rank in their first year. Leadership Position Coordinators: Assistant Scoutmaster for the new Scout patrol in the troop, Mrs. Klein. Position Back-up: Another Troop Guide, as designated alternate by SPL or Scoutmaster Duties of Troop Guide: Introduces new Scouts to troop operations Guides new Scouts through early Scouting activities Shields new Scouts from harassment by older scouts Helps new Scouts earn First Class in their first year Teaches basic Scout skills Coaches the patrol leader of the new Scout patrol on his duties Works with the patrol leader at patrol leaders council meetings Attends PLC meetings with the patrol leader of the new Scout patrol Assists the assistant Scoutmaster with training Assists Membership chair in recruiting new scouts to Troop Sets a good example Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly Lives the Scout Oath and Law Shows Scout Spirit

20 Troop Guide or Instructor Job Description: The Instructor works with scouts to help them learn skills for rank advancement and merit badge requirements. Leadership Position Coordinator: Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Scoutmaster Duties of Instructor: Teaches basic Scouting skills in troop and patrols Sets a good example Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly Lives the Scout Oath and Law Shows Scout Spirit Instructor types and Specific Duties: KnotsFire CookingFirst Aid Orienteering

21 Den Chief Job Description: The Den Chief works with the Cub Scouts, Webelos Scouts and den leaders in a Cub Scout pack. Leadership Position Coordinator: the Den Leader in the pack and the Scoutmaster. Duties of Den Chief: Knows the purposes of Cub Scouting Helps Cub Scouts advance through Cub Scout ranks Encourages Cub Scouts to join a Boy Scout troop upon graduation Assists with activities in the den meetings Serves as ambassador to Troop 732 and actively recruits new scouts from a Pack Helps out at weekly den meetings and monthly pack meetings Meets with adult members of the den, pack, and troop as necessary Sets a good example Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly Lives the Scout Oath and Law Shows Scout Spirit

22 Troop Bugler Job Description: The Troop Bugler plays for the troop on campouts and other appropriate functions. Leadership Position Coordinator: Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Scoutmaster. Duties of Bugler: Learns to play Revile and Taps. Works with Scoutmaster to determine appropriate songs for each campout Calls troop to order at campouts when present Sets a good example Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly Lives the Scout Oath and Law Shows Scout Spirit

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24 Patrol Method Baden Powell said, The patrol method is not just a way to run a troopit is the only way to run a troop! What is the patrol method? The patrol does everything on its own. It travels together, camps together, meets together, succeeds together and works together. The Patrol Leader helps each scout succeed by using shared leadership. A Patrol is proud of its name and symbol. Each member of the Patrol helps the other members.

25 Weekly Patrol Meetings Patrol meetings are normally held at every weekly meeting. These meetings should be short and organized (not social hour) Take attendance and record your patrol members uniforms Review any important points from the last PLC meeting Review each members advancement status Announce and promote the next camp or outting Take assignments for the next camp-out (choose which meals the patrol will prepare for the troop, what activities at the camp you will participate in, etc.)

26 National Honor Patrol Award Have a patrol name, flag, and yell. Put the patrol design on equipment and use the patrol yell. Keep patrol records up- to-date. Hold two patrol meetings each month. Take part in at least one hike, outdoor activity, or other Scouting event. Complete two Good Turns or service projects approved by the patrol leaders' council. Help two patrol members advance in rank. Have at least 75 percent of members in full uniform at troop activities. Have a representative attend at least three patrol leaders' council meetings. Have eight members in the patrol or experience an increase in patrol membership.

27 7 Habits of Successful Patrol Leaders Working as a Patrol I am Listening: I listen to my patrols ideas and use their ideas to help get new ideas (piggy- backing). 2. Questioning: I ask questions of my patrol to help them figure out what to do and to extend their thinking. 3. Persuading: I exchange ideas, defend my ideas and try to explain my thinking to my patrol. 4. Respecting: I respect the opinions in my patrol. I offer encouragement and support for new ideas and efforts. 5. Helping: I help my patrol by offering my assistance. 6. Sharing: I share with my patrol. I make sure I share my ideas and thinking. I share the jobs. 7. Participating: I contribute to the patrol assignment. I am actively involved with the work.

28 Patrol Leaders Council The Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) calls for, presides over and sets the agenda for all Patrol Leaders Council meetings. The SPL shall prepare an agenda prior to each PLC, and allow the Scoutmaster to review it prior to the meeting. The PLC is not the Scoutmasters meeting, but as a courtesy, the Scoutmaster is always invited to this meeting. The Scoutmaster does not need to be invited to individual patrol meetings, but is happy to attend, or assign an assistant scoutmaster to attend if the scouts would like some guidance. PLC Meetings do not need to be announced, sit-down meetings. When the troop is experiencing any type of problem, or the SPL needs in-put on a particular issue…he should convene the PLC (the One Minute Manager)

29 Misbehavior by a Scout The five steps for handling misbehavior by a scout are: 1.The Scout will be warned by his Patrol Leader. 2.The Scout will be again warned by both the Senior Patrol Leader and the Patrol Leader. 3.The Scout will be required to write and sign a note acceptably explaining his inappropriate behavior. 4.The Scout will meet with the PLC or with the Scoutmaster for counseling. 5.The Scout and the Scoutmaster will meet with the Scouts parents to discuss the problem and develop an action plan, which could include the scout being barred from certain troop activities or even expulsion from the troop.

30 Redirecting a Scout When we redirect a Scout, We do so in private, in a calm voice. We dont yell at scouts. (unless safety might be at risk!) We never publicly humiliate any Scout. Whenever possible, we sandwich correction between two positive comments. Boys should be redirected by scouts first, then by the Scoutmaster.

31 Misbehavior by an Adult Other than a situation where a scout is in immediate danger, adults should not break the chain of command! Example: The patrol has KP duty and the patrol leader has gotten his patrol memerbs to volunteer for the various tasks. Johnny is washing the dishes and Mr. Jones interrupts and tells Johnny that he needs to wash the dishes a different way, or to go do something else. Response: Johnny should respond to the parent, polity explaining that his patrol leader has assigned him to this task, or has him washing the dishes in a certain way. Johnny should then ask the adult to go check with the Scoutmaster if he has any questions. Or the Patrol Leader can intervene and explain the same thing…

32 Adult Involvement Baden Powell always said that the adults should never do anything that a scout can do himself. So, if a parent is stepping in to do anything (other than providing technical instruction) scouts need to ask the adult to go speak with the Scoutmaster

33 Camp-out Conduct -- Arrival Upon arrival to camp, everyone should convene for the SPLs roll call. Patrols should bunk together as much as possible. PLC should set plan with SPL and each Patrol Leader instruct their scouts in what needs to happen. Do not begin unpacking until you have instructions from your Patrol Leader. Unload the vehicles, and please stow your gear and make your bunks. There will be an award for the most organized bunk space. Quartermaster sets up kitchen. Food Steward Organizes the stores for the event Parents assist only when requested by the Scoutmaster, otherwise unload your own gear and relax.

34 Camp-out Conduct -- Departure Each Scout should pack their gear when they get up and finish any packing immediately after breakfast. Leave all packed gear on your bunk, keep the floor and aisles clear. When each scout is finished packing their own gear, they should help another patrol member pack their gear, or await instructions from their patrol leader. This is not free time! When instructed by their patrol leader, each scout should take their gear out to their assigned car. Each Patrol will be assigned a clean-up task by the SPL. Patrol leaders, please keep your guys on task. Parents assist only when requested by Scoutmaster, otherwise pack your own gear and relax.

35 Meal Planning The troop will be developing a better system for meal planning for events. Looking at Meal Cards, with set menu items, estimations of meal preparation time and cost per scouts We need to plan this at the patrol level, not as a troop wide activity!

36 The Importance of Training Hopefully this course will have shown each of you more clearly how the troop is organized, what responsibilities you each have and some ideas for how to run the troop more smoothly. Training will be required for each scout prior to being able to get credit for a position. You will be able to review this material on the troop website if you have any questions about how the troop should operate. Your level of attendance will be reviewed prior to being given credit for your position of responsibility. Candidates interested in running for Senior Patrol Leader will need to show that they have leadership experience as a patrol leaders before being allowed to run for that position. Simply having an higher rank will not qualify you for the position.


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