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ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 WHATS AHEAD 10.1 What Is Credit? 10.2 How to Qualify for Credit 10.3 Sources of Consumer Credit 10.4 Credit.

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Presentation on theme: "ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 WHATS AHEAD 10.1 What Is Credit? 10.2 How to Qualify for Credit 10.3 Sources of Consumer Credit 10.4 Credit."— Presentation transcript:

1 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 WHATS AHEAD 10.1 What Is Credit? 10.2 How to Qualify for Credit 10.3 Sources of Consumer Credit 10.4 Credit Rights and Responsibilities 10.5 Maintain a Good Credit Rating

2 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 LESSON 10.1 What Is Credit? GOALS Identify reasons to borrow and the trade-offs you make when you borrow. Discuss how to plan when and how much to borrow. © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 2

3 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 KEY TERMS credit equity © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 3

4 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Why Borrow? For your goals For a home A home as an investment Equity Taxes and homeownership For your education For your health © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 4

5 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Plan Your Borrowing When to borrow How much to borrow © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 5

6 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Why is borrowing an important part of most peoples life-span financial plans? Why should you be careful not to take on more debt than you can easily repay? © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 6

7 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Why is borrowing an important part of most peoples life-span financial plans? Many life-span goals require more financial support than most people are able to pay for through saving. Examples include homes, automobiles, and education. © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 7

8 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Why should you be careful not to take on more debt than you can easily repay? Credit can easily lead to out-of-control spending, and debt will increase as will the interest owed. Taking on more debt than you can easily repay can make life uncomfortable. © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 8

9 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 LESSON 10.2 How to Qualify for Credit GOALS Explain how lenders judge your creditworthiness. Describe the factors that determine your credit rating. © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 9

10 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 KEY TERMS creditworthiness character credit history cosign capacity capital credit bureau credit rating © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 10

11 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Your Creditworthiness Character Capacity Capital © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 11

12 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Your Credit Rating Loan applications Credit bureaus Credit ratings © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 12

13 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Credit Rating Factors Payment history Current debt Length of credit history New accounts and inquiries Types of credit used © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 13

14 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 How does a lender use the three Cs of credit? What kinds of information is a credit bureau collecting about you? © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 14

15 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 How does a lender use the three Cs of credit? A lender judges your creditworthiness using the three Cs of credit: Character Capacity Capital © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 15

16 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 What kinds of information is a credit bureau collecting about you? Your past borrowing Your repayment history © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 16

17 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 LESSON 10.3 Sources of Consumer Credit GOALS Explain differences between a secured and an unsecured loan. Describe benefits and costs of using credit cards. © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 17

18 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 KEY TERMS secured loan collateral installment loan unsecured loan regular charge account revolving charge account grace period credit limit © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 18

19 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Types of Consumer Borrowing Secured loan Collateral Installment loan Unsecured loan © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 19

20 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Sources of Loans Banking institutions Other sources of consumer loans Finance companies Payday loans Life insurance companies Credit card cash advances Pawnbrokers Rent-to-own companies © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 20

21 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Credit Cards Regular charge accounts Revolving charge accounts Sources of credit cards Credit card incentives © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 21

22 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Credit Card Costs Annual fees Interest Limits and penalties © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 22

23 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Control Credit Card Costs A loan as an alternative The minimum payment trap Choose the least expensive card © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 23

24 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 What is the difference between a secured and an unsecured loan? What should you consider when choosing a credit card? © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 24

25 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 What is the difference between a secured and an unsecured loan? A secured loan is backed by a thing of value (collateral). Borrowers risk the loss of their pledged collateral if they are unable to repay the loan. An unsecured loan has no such collateral. Unsecured loans generally carry high interest rates because of the increased risk taken on by the lender. © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 25

26 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 What should you consider when choosing a credit card? The cost of the card (annual fees, interest rates) Limits and penalties associated with the card Whether the card offers incentives or supports organizations you consider valuable © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 26

27 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 LESSON 10.4 Credit Rights and Responsibilities GOALS Discuss ways that laws protect your credit rights. Describe how to take responsibility for your own financial health. © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 27

28 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 KEY TERMS finance charge annual percentage rate (APR) © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 28

29 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Consumer Credit Rights Truth in lending Equality in lending Protect your credit history Act if you are refused credit Resolve billing and product quality problems Protection from abusive collection practices © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 29

30 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Consumer Credit Responsibilities Accept responsibility Know your debt capacity Credit and family Self-control with credit Pay more than the minimum Avoid too many credit cards Pay cash Keep accurate records © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 30

31 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 How do laws pertaining to consumer credit protect your rights and help you make good credit decisions? Describe a common sense approach for determining whether you can responsibly handle more debt. © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 31

32 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 How do laws pertaining to consumer credit protect your rights and help you make good credit decisions? Truth in Lending Act (1968) ensures that all lenders calculate credit costs in the same way so that consumers can more easily compare rates. Fair Credit Reporting Act (1971) Equal Credit Opportunity Act (1975) Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (1977) Consumer Credit Reporting Reform Act (1996) Fair Credit Billing Act © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 32

33 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Take- home pay – Fixed expenses (rent, utilities, etc.) – Other expenses (food, gas, clothes, etc.) –Savings 0 Describe a common sense approach for determining whether you can responsibly handle more debt. If nothing is left after this calculation, you cant afford more debt: Credit cards require self-control because it is tempting and easy to buy too much or repay too little. © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 33

34 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 LESSON 10.5 Maintain a Good Credit Rating GOALS Explain how to establish a positive credit history. Discuss how to avoid credit problems and get help if you need it. © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 34

35 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 KEY TERMS acceleration clause balloon payment identity theft debt consolidation loan bankruptcy © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 35

36 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Establish Your Credit History Start small Establish your own credit Avoid common credit mistakes Read what you sign Be aware of identity theft © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 36

37 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 Help for Credit Problems Debt consolidation loans Cost of a debt consolidation loan Its a bandage, not a cure Credit counseling services Bankruptcy © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 37

38 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 What steps should you take to establish a positive credit history? If you experience credit problems, what steps can you take to get out of debt? © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 38

39 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 What steps should you take to establish a positive credit history? Start small by opening a store credit account Pay your bills on time Save regularly Charge small amounts and pay them off immediately Live in the same place Dont change jobs often © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 39

40 ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR CONSUMERS Chapter 10 If you experience credit problems, what steps can you take to get out of debt? Obtain a debt consolidation loan Get credit counseling Use bankruptcy as a last resort © 2010 South-Western, Cengage Learning Slide 40


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