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The Marriage of DI and CCSS Deborah Jones Charles Co. Public Schools Gifted Resource Teacher.

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Presentation on theme: "The Marriage of DI and CCSS Deborah Jones Charles Co. Public Schools Gifted Resource Teacher."— Presentation transcript:

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2 The Marriage of DI and CCSS Deborah Jones Charles Co. Public Schools Gifted Resource Teacher

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4 DI and CCSS pre-nups Know – Mindset – Ongoing assessments – High quality connected curriculum – Teaching up – Student interest, readiness and learning profile – Respectful tasks – Common core shifts in math – Common core shifts in literacy

5 UNDERSTAND The basis for differentiation must be your knowledge of the standards that your students must achieve and of where each of them is with respect to those standards. Environment, curriculum, assessment, instruction and leadership create a classroom system of interdependent parts. Quality curriculum begins with a set of goals and objectives that represent the essence of the discipline students will study Quality curriculum makes explicit the knowledge, understanding and skills that students should acquire during a segment of study in order to achieve the specified learning goals

6 Do Explain how CCSS calls for attention to student differences Recognize the ways differentiation supports the instructional shifts of the CC Engage in hands on DI activities that can be readily adapted and supported by CCSS

7 DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION At its most basic level, differentiating instruction means shaking up what goes on in the classroom while allowing each student to learn at the depth, complexity and pace that is most beneficial. It is a rich, proactive and effective approach to providing for the needs of all students so that students have multiple options for taking in information, making sense of ideas, and expressing what they learn. The nature of the core is of an essential, irreducible set of knowledge and skills. The common core standards establish appropriate benchmarks for all students and provide a common framework to guide each state in helping all students succeed. The CCSS do not specify how the states will implement and use these standards. Overall there is an increased level of rigor expected when using the CCSS.

8 General Principles of Differentiation Teachers can differentiate … Content Process Product …according to students… ReadinessInterestLearning Profile …using a range of strategies… tiered assignments contracts Rafts Interest groups Think-pair-share Graphic organizers Cubing Learning Environment Guided by a growth mindset and a teachers response to learners needs

9 Guiding Principle: Differentiation is a PHILOSOPHY, not a Bag of Tricks.

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12 1.Non negotiables for effective implementation Quality Differentiation Build a student-teacher connection Possess a growth mindset CCSS Believe every child is worthy of complex curriculum, and complex thought Have a growth mind set

13 Find an elbow partner and talk about how this might look in your classroom Elbow

14 Practical, school-friendly, growth- mind setting connection strategies Take photos of students as they are working on projects Ask a nonparticipating student an open-ended question Respond nonevaluatively at least 3 times per class Make mistakes Specify daily learning objectives

15 more strategy ideas Acknowledge the benefits of problem behavior Be curious together Refuse to be bias by standardized test scores

16 2. Non negotiables for effective implementation Quality Differentiation Routed in rich, meaningful curriculum. Differentiate to enable the largest possible number of students to succeed ALWAYS TEACH UP! NEVER WATER DOWN! CCSS Common Core emphasizes engagement and understanding and requiresteaching up! FEWER STANDARDS CLEARER STANDARDS HIGHER STANDARDS

17 Teaching up supports the mathematical shifts Common Core Math Mind map Deborah Riley

18 Teaching up supports the literacy shifts Determine the ways differentiation supports the instructional shifts in the common core. Discuss what it mean to challenge learners? Review requirements/non-negotiables for successful differentiation of Common Core standards and learning experiences What will teachers need help in understanding and doing? What steps should we be commending in helping teachers learn to teach up? Common Core Literacy Mind map Deborah Riley

19 K.U.D.s are….. A road map to essential outcomes. The basis of engagement The insurance policy for student understanding The foundation for differentiation

20 On your way to the beach, you are driving through Traffic Ticket, USA. Suddenly, you realize that the local police officer is signaling to you to pull over and stop. When Officer U. R. Speeden approaches your car, you ask him, Whats the problem, Officer? What will Officer Speeden make certain you know? KNOW The speed limit in Traffic Ticket, USA The speed at which your vehicle was traveling The procedures for paying speeding tickets K.U.D.

21 Officer U. R. Speeden will make certain you… UNDERSTAND What will he make certain you understand? Speeding may cost you money, your license, or your life. DO What will he make certain you do? Demonstrate remorse for disobeying the posted speed limits. Pay the ticket.

22 Planning a Focused Curriculum Means Clarity About What Students Should … KNOW – Facts – Vocabulary – Definitions UNDERSTAND –Principles/ generalizations –Big ideas of the discipline BE ABLE TO DO –Processes –Skills

23 PRIMARILY PLANTS

24 KNOW Parts of a plant – Root, stem, leaf, flower, seed Plants need: – Light, water, air, soil, food

25 UNDERSTAND : 1.Plants have needs that must be met in order for them to survive. 2.Each plant part has a job to do that helps the whole plant. 3.If one plant cant do its job, the whole plant suffers

26 Do: 1.Identify and describe the plant parts 2.Explain the role of each plant part in meeting the plants needs 1.Work independently 2.Work collaboratively 3.Draw Conclusions

27 Checking your KUD Plant needs The names and functions of plant parts. Life cycle of a plant Identify and describe plant parts. Explain the role of each plant part. Explain what plants need. Carry out simple experiments. Record changes in the life cycle of a plant. Plants have needs that must be met in order for them to grow and survive. Each plant part has a specific job that helps the plant. If one plant part cant do its job, the whole plant suffers. A plant and its parts change as the plant grows. KnowUnderstandDo ASCD 2007 Tools for High Quality Differentiated Instruction

28 PLANET SHOW AND TELL Directions: We have been studying the solar system. Choose the planet that most interest you and design one of the following products to show what you have learned.

29 Planet Show and Tell Know: – Facts about the planets Understand: – Planets in our solar system have many characteristics in common, but they also differ greatly from one another Do: – Compare another planet to Earth

30 Planet MI Task V/L Write a story about your planet L/M Make a chart that compares your planet to Earth M/R Make up a song about your planet B/K Make up or adapt a game about your planet (Saturn ring- toss, etc.) Beware of Twinky Curriculum (Engaging maybe, but pointless) What type(s) of differentiation is this teacher attempting ?

31 PLANET SHOW AND TELL V/L L/M M B/K Make up a story about your planet that shows the major ways in which it is similar to and differs from Earth Make a chart that compares your planet to Earth. Be sure the chart reveals both similarities and differences Make up a song about your planet that shows the major ways in which it is similar to and differs from Earth Make up or adapt a game that would help your classmates discover the similarities and differences between your planet and Earth.

32 3. Non negotiables for effective implementation Quality Differentiation Is guided by on-going assessments for planning and feedback…..NOT GRADES! CCSS Effective implementation requires effective use of formative assessment for instructional planning and to guide a students ability to contribute to their own growth and success

33 ) On-going Assessment: A Diagnostic Continuum Preassessment (Finding Out) Formative Assessment (Keeping Track & Checking-up) Summative Assessment (Making sure) Should Not Be Graded May or May Not Be Graded Usually Graded

34 FRAYER ORGANIZER Description DEFINITION KEY WORDS EXAMPLES NON EXAMPLES Tomlinson - 02

35 Frayer Diagrams DEFINE IT LIST EXAMPLES LIST NON-EXAMPLES GIVE IMPORTANCE TOPIC or CONCEPT You can change the category titles to suit your instructional needs. 35

36 Pre-Assessing Using Graphic Organizers Define it…Give an example… Draw a pictureAsk a question about it… 36

37 Define it… A prehistoric fish Give an example… Tesselations no longer live on earth. Give a non- example… I dont know Ask a question about it… Why are we studying tesselations in math? Tesselations Pre-Assessment Name: Eric G. 37

38 Example of a Pre-Assessment Second Grade Rules and Laws Unit Pre-assessment directions: I will have students take out a sheet of paper and fold it so there are four sections. I will ask a question for them to answer in each section. Students will have the choice of writing their answers or drawing pictures to demonstrate their answers. The page will look as follows, and the questions are the questions I will ask: 1. List three school rules and 2. School rules help children... provide reasons for the rules. 3. What rules should you follow 4. How can you influence while riding in a car? rule- making as a child? 38

39 Frayers can be simplified too! 39

40 Exit Cards/Entry Cards Explain the difference between simile and metaphor. Give some examples of each as part of your explanation.

41 Exit/Entry Cards What does a quarter note look like? A half note? Whole note?

42 Entry/Exit Cards Draw and label the parts of a plant. Why does a plant have all of these parts?

43 Directions: Complete the chart to show what you know about Jazz. Write as much as you can. Origins Famous Composers Or Performers Rhythms Jazz Personal Experience

44 4. Non negotiables for effective implementation Quality Differentiation Results in a teacher planning based on student readiness, interest and learning profile CCSS States that whatever students need to be successful, teachers will provide the pathway thus making teacher creativity and expertise in selecting appropriate strategies essential in helping each student succeed

45 OPTIONS FOR DIFFERENTIATION OF INSTRUCTION To Differentiate Instruction By Readiness To Differentiate Instruction By Interest To Differentiate Instruction by Learning Profile ٭ add or remove scaffolding ٭ vary difficulty level of text & supplementary materials ٭ adjust task familiarity ٭ vary direct instruction by small group ٭ adjust proximity of ideas to student experience ٭ encourage application of broad concepts & principles to student interest areas ٭ give choice of mode of expressing learning ٭ use interest-based mentoring of adults or more expert-like peers ٭ give choice of tasks and products (including student designed options) ٭ give broad access to varied materials & technologies ٭ create an environment with flexible learning spaces and options ٭ allow working alone or working with peers ٭ use part-to-whole and whole-to- part approaches ٭ Vary teacher mode of presentation (visual, auditory, kinesthetic, concrete, abstract) ٭ adjust for gender, culture, language differences. useful instructional strategies: - tiered activities - Tiered products - compacting - learning contracts - tiered tasks/alternative forms of assessment useful instructional strategies: - interest centers - interest groups - enrichment clusters - group investigation - choice boards - MI options useful instructional strategies: - multi-ability cooperative tasks - MI options (Gardner) - Triarchic options (Sternberg) CA Tomlinson, UVa 97

46 Content The stuff we teach (KUDs)or how kids get access to the stuff Process How kids come to understand or make sense of or come to own the KUDs Product How kids show what theyve come to know, understand, & are able to do Tomlinson 08

47 to Differentiate Product Choices based on readiness, interest, and learning profile Clear expectations Timelines Agreements Product Guides Rubrics Evaluation RAFTs Menus

48 to Differentiate Content Reading Partners / Reading Buddies Read/Summarize Read/Question/Answer Visual Organizer/Summarizer Parallel Reading with Teacher Prompt Choral Reading/Antiphonal Reading Flip Books Split Journals (Double Entry – Triple Entry) Books on Tape Highlights on Tape Digests/ Cliff Notes Notetaking Organizers Varied Texts Varied Supplementary Materials Highlighted Texts Think-Pair-Share/Preview-Midview-Postview Varied Homework Tomlinson – 00

49 TO DIFFERENTIATE PROCESS Fun & Games RAFTs Cubing, Think Dots Choices (Intelligences) Centers Tiered lessons Contracts

50 A RAFT is … … an engaging, high level strategy that encourages writing across the curriculum … a way to encourage students to… – …assume a role – …consider their audience – …write/produce in a particular format – …examine a topic from a relevant perspective All of the above can serve as motivators by giving students choice, appealing to their interests and learning profiles, and adapting to student readiness levels. Carol Tomlinson

51 PLANT R.A.F.T. RoleAudienceFormatTopic Plant part Plant needs Picture Were made for each other! Roots Stem, leaf, flower & seeds Letter Youd be lost without me! Flowers Stem, leaf, seeds, & roots Ad Im more than just a pretty face! Seeds Flower, leaf, stem, & roots Song or poem Heres where you got your start Stem Flower, leaf, seeds & roots Chart Why you cant do without me! Leaf Stem, seeds, flowers, roots 2 riddles Why Im important to you!

52 Checking your KUD Plant needs The names and functions of plant parts. Life cycle of a plant Identify and describe plant parts. Explain the role of each plant part. Explain what plants need. Carry out simple experiments. Record changes in the life cycle of a plant. Plants have needs that must be met in order for them to grow and survive. Each plant part has a specific job that helps the plant. If one plant part cant do its job, the whole plant suffers. A plant and its parts change as the plant grows. KnowUnderstandDo ASCD 2007 Tools for High Quality Differentiated Instruction

53 READINESS DIFFERENTIATION: WRITING RAFT The teacher will assign sets of choices to students based on preassessed skill levels in sequencing and writing: Grade level or Advanced level. Within a skill level, students will still have some learning style or interest-based choices through the format options. Levels would NOT be seen by the students. Know:sequence; pace Understand: Seeing events in a logical order helps us better understand them. Do: Place items in order of occurrence; write with accuracy & completeness GTortoiseHare6-panel storyboardHow I won the race GYouteacherbulleted listThings I do in the morning to get ready for school GSports starreporternews itemHeres how I got injured..., and what Ill do next... ACousinyouset of directionsHelp me learn to play checkers AHermione Granger Harry Potter conversation or dialogueWhat happened to make you so suspicious of Snape? AMarbleKidMarble Raceway model with exhibit card describing each tumble or turning point Watch me roll! Sandra Page 2008

54 R.A.F.T. Write several s to possible readers telling them about an important thing that happened to you in the story. R. Storys main character A. Readers F. T. Storys main event Make an outline to send to your publisher of your storys plot. R. Storys author A. Storys publisher F. Outline T. Storys plot You write a weekly column I the newspaper where you review stories. Write a review of this story. Include strengths and weaknesses. R. Newspaper critic A. Newspaper readers F. Column T. Story Tier 1TTier 2Tier 3

55 Math RAFT paper Know: Understand: Do: R. Point A. Teacher F. Letter T. Convince the teacher that you have an important function

56 Dear Mrs. Smith, I am Pete, the point. I am one point of an endless number of points in space. I want to ask you if you will teach your students about us points and explain how every single geometric figure is made up of us. It is very important to me because it seems that many people think of the point as a small part of geometry since we are so little. Though we are little, we are one of the most important factors in our world of geometry. Without me and all other points, there would be no geometric figures. We are their building blocks. Though all lines are drawn with one solid mark, in reality, a line is an endless set of points going in opposite directions. A sphere is a figure with all points at an equal distance from a center point like me. So please, tell your students all about us points. It troubles me when many think of us as unimportant specks in space. Please spread the reality of our importance to the students you teach. My partners and I would greatly appreciate it. Thank you, Pete

57 Differentiation by Interest Speech - Thanksgiving - RAFT ROLE AUDIENCE FORMAT TOPIC TurkeyThe Axe Last words My last requests Horn of Other table Introduction No one knows what Plentysettings I do Pilgrim s Husband List of I m preparing food Wife Complaints for how many? AxeOther tools Speech to Time to look sharp! in the shed Inform CranberriesGrocery shoppers Speech to I m sweet – buy me! Persuade StuffingCook Begging You re putting me WHERE?????

58 Consider this… You are a unit of measurement in math, an inch, foot or year. Think about what your job is. What items do you measure? How big are you? Where can you be found or used? Either alone, with a partner or in a small group,

59 Measurement RAFT ROLE AUDIENCE FORMAT TOPIC A unit of measurement in math: inch, foot, yard Classmates A Cinquain Poem Describe your job as a unit of measure

60 Sample rubric to accompany RAFT assignment Completed on Time Writing/project appropriate for the audience Format Followed Information accurate Grammar and mechanics Neatness Creativity

61 When Tiering: Adjust--- Level of Complexity Amount of Structure Materials Time/Pace Number of Steps Form of Expression Level of Dependence

62 Think of the tiers as…. Tier 1 Approaching the standard Tier 2 Ready for the Standard Tier 3 Moving on DEFINITIONThese students do not have the skills to be successful with the standard yet. We must scaffold for them This is what the standard states for all students within your grade level/subject These students have shown mastery of the standard through preassessment. They need to challenged with more depth and complexity STUDENT SAYS I need help Ive GOT it! I need more! TEACHERS ROLESpend more time here Spend some time here Some direction from teacher, mostly independent

63 Whats wrong with these tasks? Group One: Draw a picture of an acute angle. Group Two: Write a scene in which an equilateral triangle and an isosceles triangle argue over who is more perfect. Group Three: Make a list of all of the types of angles that you know.

64 COMPLEXITY Team 1 Heres the data: 7% sales tax Dance ticket: $2.50 Pizza Place: beverage- $2.99 pizza- $6.99 split cost evenly include tax Music Place: CD- $15.00 (1/3 off) Include Tax Team 2 Heres the data: 6.5% sales tax Dance ticket: $2.50 Pizza Place: beverage- $2.99 pizza- $6.99 split cost evenly include tax and tip Music Place: CD- $15.00 (25% off) Include Tax

65 Tiered Character Maps Character name________ Why the author gives THESE clues? The authors bottom line about this character Clues the author gives us about the character How the character looks Character name___________ Most important thing to know about the character How the character thinks or acts Character name____________ What the character really MEANS to say or do What the character would mostly like us to know about him or her What the character says or does

66 LANGUAGE ARTS Standard: Tier 1 Students create a product that shows the theme of a novel read Tier 2: Students create a product that compares the theme in this novel with the theme in another novel. (Teacher may provide theme) Tier 3: Students examine how the theme of the novel developed over time in the story from the beginning through the middle to the end.

67 Aunty Math Challenges

68 Mathematical math practices 1.Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them 2.Reason abstractly and quantitatively 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others 4.Model with mathematics 5.Use appropriate tools strategically 6.Attend to precision 7.Look for and make use of structure 8.Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning

69 Beasley, 2012 Building a Persuasive Paragraph KNOW: Parts that come together to create a persuasive paragraph Purpose of a persuasive paragraph Topic sentence, elaboration, concluding statement, persuasive paragraph UNDERSTAND: The structure of text influences meaning. DO: Students will… 1. Organize an individual paragraph with topic sentence, relevant elaboration, and a concluding sentence 2. Analyze a paragraph to identify key components of a persuasive paragraph 3 rd Grade Common Core: 3.W.1: Write opinion piece supporting a point of view with reasons.

70 Pre-Assessment Administered during previous week Writing prompt What do you think? – Read the following prompt and let us know what you think about this issue. Write a paragraph that would help someone know what your point of view is about the decision. – The school board met and decided that recess would no longer be needed in school. They felt that it would help students spend more time learning without being interrupted each day for recess. What do YOU think? Include a question about what interests themin order to select topics that students are passionate about. Results: – Group A – Group A– Writing indicated that they were comfortable with the organization of their argument – Group B – Group B – Writing indicated that they struggled with organizing their argument

71 Steps in Lesson Reintroduce the pre-assessment topic and have the students Think-Pair-Share about their own opinion of the topic. Ask pairs to read the two sample paragraphs (both with the same opinion, but one is organized well, and another is not) and talk about which one they felt was more persuasive. Introduce to the whole group the vocabulary of organizing a paragraph (topic sentence, supporting details, elaboration, concluding sentence). As a class, go through each definition while all students highlight the example in the example paragraph with markers (Green – topic sentence, Blue- supporting details, Orange- elaborations, Red- concluding sentence). Beasley, 2012

72 Sample Paragraph There are many reasons why we shouldnt have recess during the school day. First of all, if we didnt have recess, we would have more time to work on projects in school without being interrupted. Sometimes I am in the middle of something really, really important and then all of a sudden, we have to stop and I have to leave it behind. By not having recess, fewer students would get hurt. It seems that every time we are out on the playground, someone trips or falls and needs to go to the nurse. Finally, by not having recess, we might do better on tests. Everyone would have longer to study and we could all get As. So you see, if we didnt have recess, it would be good for our school. Beasley, 2012

73 Groups Quarter Pounder Group – Grab your boxes and meet at the left side table Big Mac Group – Grab your boxes and meet at the right side table Beasley, 2012

74 Quarter Pounder Group Pick up the Quarter Pounder boxes. With a partner, work on the jumbled paragraph inside your box. When you feel that it is organized, retrieve the answer key and check your work. Glue your corrected paragraph to your paper and turn in. Meet with teacher to talk about a model for persuasive paragraphs. Your teacher will give you a graphic organizer that will be used to organize your paragraph. Complete the following assignment Using the graphic organizer, choose one of the following topics and tell us what you think about… – Whether chewing gum should be allowed in class, whether students should be allowed to bring toys to school, whether dogs make better pets than cats. Your task will be graded according to how well you demonstrate an understanding of the organization of a persuasive paragraph. Beasley, 2012

75 Sample of graphic organizer for Big Mac Group Beasley, 2012

76 Big Mac Group Pick up the Big Mac boxes. With a partner, work on the jumbled paragraph inside your box. When you feel that it is organized, raise your hands to have your teacher check your answer. Glue your corrected paragraph to your paper and turn in. Meet with teacher to talk about a model for persuasive paragraphs. Your teacher will give you a graphic organizer that will be used to organize your paragraph. Complete the following assignment: Using the graphic organizer, choose one of the following topics and tell us what you think about… – Whether chewing gum should be allowed in class, whether students should be allowed to bring toys to school, whether dogs make better pets than cats. – If you need a hint, go to retrieve an extra topping from our jars! Your task will be graded according to how well you demonstrate an understanding of the organization of a persuasive paragraph. Beasley, 2012

77 Sample of graphic organizer for Big Mac Group Beasley, 2012

78 5. Non negotiables for effective implementation Quality Differentiation Requires teacher leadership and flexibility with regards to classroom management CCSS Effective use requires an orderly, flexible classroom so students can debate ideas, make mistakes, and learn from those mistakes. Learning becomes real.

79 What am I really trying to accomplish with classroom management or leadership?

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81 With regard to Planning for a Differentiated Classroom …………. Some Practical Considerations Work from a Philosophy--& Share it with the Kids (Build it Together!) Give Thoughtful Directions Establish Routines Stay Aware, Stay Organized Consider Home Base Seats Establish Start-up and Wrap-up Procedures Teach Students to Work for Quality De-brief & troubleshoot with Kids, Make them Partners Tomlinson, The Differentiated Classroom

82 DeBonos Six Thinking Hats R5.3,, 4.3, Compare/contrast, compare, W3-5.1, W ab

83 Six Thinking Hats white hat What information is available? What information do we need? How are we going to get the missing information? red hat What aremy feelings right now? What does my intuition tell me? What is my gut reaction? black hat What are some possible problems? What difficulties could we encounter? What are points for caution? What are the risks? green hat What creative ideas do we have? What are the alternatives? How can we overcome the black hat difficulties? yellow hat What are the benefits? What are the positives? What are the values? Can this be made to work? Blue hat Where should we start? What is the agenda? What are the objectives? Which hats should we use? How can we summarize? What should we do next?

84 Using your thinking cap, consider the following scenario Teachers using new methodologies should have a 30% pay raise. (Dont worry if you agree or disagree with this statement)

85 Guiding Principle: Differentiation is a PHILOSOPHY, not a Bag of Tricks.

86 Textbooks and a list of standards alone are NOT high quality curriculum! CCSC

87 To make a high quality curriculum, you must combine all ingredients in an appetizing way Only then can you get the right balance of ingredients to have a quality curriculum for all!

88 Without CCSS and DI

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