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GCSE Classical Civilisation. Starting the course – some things to think about Practical considerations Supporting pupils Resources The new GCSE – 2009.

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Presentation on theme: "GCSE Classical Civilisation. Starting the course – some things to think about Practical considerations Supporting pupils Resources The new GCSE – 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 GCSE Classical Civilisation

2 Starting the course – some things to think about Practical considerations Supporting pupils Resources The new GCSE – 2009 onwards

3 Choosing the topics for GCSE

4 Factors to consider? Interest Teacher expertise Ability of pupils Resources? Difficulty? Greek v Roman topics? Literature v civilisation? Coursework?

5 Present OCR specification - Civilisation topics Greek religion Home & family in Athens Greek athletic & theatrical festivals Greek art & architecture Sparta and the Spartan system Roman religion Roman home & family life Roman Sport and Leisure Pompeii Roman Britain

6 Present OCR specification - Literature topics Odyssey Iliad Oedipus/Antigone Hippolytus/ Alcestis Aristophanes Herodotus Aeneid Ovid Plinys letters (selection) Tacitus

7 Balance between civilisation and literature? Greek and Roman? Is literature more difficult than civilisation? Can school visits support some topics (eg.Hadrians Wall/ Bath/Chedworth/ Pompeii)? Is Classics offered at KS3? Do some pupils also do Latin? Is A level CC offered in the school? Will one of the topics be coursework?

8 Eventual choice Roman Sport and Leisure Pompeii Roman Britain Odyssey (Iliad) Plinys letters No coursework!

9 Roman sport & leisure Chariot racing Gladiators & the amphitheatre Theatre Baths Hunting

10 Pompeii Origin of Pompeii – history & development, layout, walls & gates etc Specific houses/villas Forum Industry – bakers, fulling, thermopolia Earthquake & eruption of Vesuvius Excavation - Fiorelli

11 Roman Britain Conquest Boudica Development & government of towns Hadrians Wall Roman Army Forts Villas – Lullingstone & Chedworth

12 Odyssey selections Books 9, 10, 21, 22, 23

13 Plinys letters – a selection Plinys uncle – eruption of Vesuvius Family life – Calpurnia Slaves, including the murder of Macedo Comum, his home town (The Bithynia letters)

14 Resources Make your own! No overall text book – some books for recommended reading are out of print Better resources including Pompeii Interactive Civilisation – as much primary evidence as possible (vroma site) Literature needs a lot of support, especially for weaker pupils.

15 A typical group?! Sara – g & t (+ doing Latin off-timetable) Aaron – g & t, but lazy and sometimes disruptive. Tom, Jamie and Robbie – bright, articulate but often do the minimum in written work Hattie – severe spelling difficulties Jamie – Aspergers - statemented Mark – SEN and statemented Max – SEN and statemented Plus nine others of varying abilities.

16 Every child matters

17 As this is a GCSE subject, one of the aims is for all pupils to have a neat and accurate set of notes from which he/she can revise. In these mixed ability groups, where all pupils are being taught the same topics, differentiated resources are essential.

18 Differentiation of resources Starter activities Worksheets for tasks on a passage of (eg) the Odyssey or features of a house in Pompeii Audio (eg. War with Troy) and images Fill in the gap sheets to accompany a PowerPoint presentation. Duplicated notes for pupils to annotate or highlight Spidergrams, flow diagrams etc (via IWB) Computer programs/DVDs (Classics Resource centre)/Task Magic, CLC elearning resource.

19 Differentiation of teaching methods Small groups with a mixture of abilities? LSA working with less able pupils Computer software – especially Pompeii Interactive Individual tasks with support from teacher/LSA Teaching from the front

20 Odyssey Book 21 – lines Make notes on this section by answering the following questions In what way did Telemachus think he was behaving strangely? (Telemachus said he was behaving in a strange way because he was ……….………… …………………………………………………………………………………………………….) How did he describe Penelope? (He described Penelope as ………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………………………..….) What did he tell the Suitors to do? (He told the Suitors to ………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………..…………………………………………………….……)

21 (As the Suitors are trying to string the bow, without success, Eumaeus and Philoetius slip outside the house. Odysseus decides to follow them and find out if they are on his side.) Odysseus:Hey, cowman and swineherd! Shall I………………………………… ……………………… or keep silent? No, I must ……………………………………….. What I need to know is this: if Odysseus …………..……… ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………… Philoetius:O Zeus! Bring him home! If Odysseus came home, ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ………………………… Eumaeus:………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… …………………………………………………..

22 Villa of the Mysteries

23 Particular features It was outside Pompeii (see map) It was built on an artificial platform to make the building level (the space underneath was used as a cellar)

24 The Villa of the Mysteries Particular features It is …………………………………………………………………….…………… Pompeii (see the plan of the town) It was built on an artificial platform to …..………………………………………………………….. (the space below was used as a cellar) 12

25 Outside view with platformThe covered balcony

26 Calpurnia Learnt Plinys poems by heart and set some to music Sends messengers to see how well Pliny is doing in court Doesnt waste money – thrifty Sits behind a curtain during a poetry reading Goes to Campania to recover from illness Brought up by her aunt, Hispulla Loves Pliny for his mind and what he stands for Clever and quick- witted

27 GCSE from 2009 onwards From September 2009 the GCSE is made up of 4 mandatory units, A351, A352, A353 and A354. Units A351, A352 and A353 are externally assessed, whilst Unit A354 is controlled assessment. From September 2009 the GCSE (Short Course) is made up of 2 units; one of which is controlled assessment and one of which is externally assessed. These form 50% of the corresponding GCSE (Full Course). The controlled assessment unit A354 is mandatory. In addition candidates must take any one from Units A351, A352 and A353.

28 Unit A351: City Life in the Classical World Option 1: Athens Option 2: Rome Unit A352: Epic and Myth Option 1: Homer The Odyssey Option 2: Ovid Metamorphoses Unit A353: Community Life in the Classical World Option 1: Sparta Option 2: Pompeii Unit A354: Culture and Society in the Classical World Option 1: Sophocles Antigone Option 2: Aristophanes Lysistrata Option 3: The Olympic Games Option 4: Virgil The Aeneid Option 5: Pliny Letters Option 6: Roman Britain

29 A Civilisation topic

30 City life in the Classical World Option 2: Rome The focus of this option is the everyday life for an ancient Roman citizen in the capital of the empire. Candidates should have a basic understanding of Romes status as the ruler of a vast empire. Candidates are required to have knowledge and understanding of three main areas of Roman life: Religion: its role and importance in the lives of the Romans. The family in Rome: the roles and duties of its individual members. Entertainment and recreation in Rome: the appeal of these leisure activities in the context of Roman society and their value to the emperor in the control of its people. Candidates will be expected to respond to sources and to draw conclusions about the values and priorities of the citizens of Rome and the image Rome portrayed to rest of her empire. Specific Topics: State Gods and goddesses Jupiter, Neptune, Mercury, Mars, Pluto (Hades), Apollo, Juno, Venus, Minerva, Diana, Vesta and Ceres. Their responsibilities and symbols and how they are typically represented in Roman art. Temples Religious and other functions: the position of the altar, the cult statue, use by worshippers. Sacrifice: Its purpose, surroundings, officials, animals, the ritual from the selection of the animal to the disposal of the remains.

31 The Vestal Virgins:Their selection, duties and privileges, their code of behaviour, daily activities. The origin, importance and significance of the sacred flame. The festival of the Bona Dea. The Temple of Vesta in the Roman Forum. Mystery Religions: Mithras: the myth associated with the cult and its significance, the different levels of initiation, the cults appeal to its followers, the details of a typical temple, a typical meeting of the worshippers. Isis: the myth associated with the cult and its significance, the priests, the cults appeal to its followers, the details of the celebrations, the details of a typical temple, a typical meeting of the worshippers. The Role of the paterfamilias His rights over family members and slaves, his involvement in the education of his son, the supervisory duties connected with religion, family finance, his responsibilities towards his clients. Women Status, rights and duties, daily activities, spinning and weaving, the supervision of slaves, the wife as mother. Marriage: betrothal, a typical wedding ceremony; procession to and arrival at the home. The Dinner Party (cena):The organisation, guests, entertainment, purposes

32 Slaves: Ways to become a slave, skilled and unskilled slaves, purchase, duties inside and outside the home for both male and female slaves, opportunities for freedom. The Colosseum The arena, size, access, seating, structure, sub-structure, movement of fighters and animals from cells to the arena, use of scenery. A typical day at the Colosseum Animal shows: types of animal, the bestiarius, men versus animals, performing animals, fights between animals, hunts. Executions. Gladiator shows: origins as funerary honours, types of gladiator; retarius, secutors (samnite, myrmilo), armour, weaponry, typical fights training (ludi gladiatorii), oaths, status. Audience involvement. The significance of the shows for both the Emperor and his citizens. The Circus Maximus: The arena, its structure, size, the seating, the track, the spina, the metae, the carceres. A typical day at the races: The days events. The teams and colours, the dangers, the status of charioteers and horses, public attitudes, audience involvement, betting, the social significance of such events

33 An Epic and Myth topic

34 Option 1: Homer The Odyssey This option will require candidates to have a detailed knowledge of the set books, and to analyse, evaluate and respond to them in their cultural and literary context. Homer The Odyssey Books 5, 6, 7, 9 10 and 12. Candidates should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the following: Odysseus as a hero; The role and characterisation of Odysseus, Calypso, Nausicaa, Alcinous, Arete, Polyphemus, the Cyclopes, Circe and Athene; The Presentation of the Sirens, Scylla and Charybdis; The role of the gods; The role of women (to include Calypso and Circe as well as the mortal women); Xenia (the guest-host relationship) in the Odyssey; Civilisation and barbarism; Homers narrative and descriptive techniques; Homer as a story-teller and the idea of epic.

35 Controlled assessment Unit A354: Culture and Society in the Classical World Option 1: Sophocles Antigone Option 2: Aristophanes Lysistrata Option 3: The Olympic Games Option 4: Virgil The Aeneid Option 5: Pliny Letters Option 6: Roman Britain


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