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© 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. B ELL WORK Chapter One: Book introduction Grab the Chapter One Book Overview worksheet and a.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. B ELL WORK Chapter One: Book introduction Grab the Chapter One Book Overview worksheet and a."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. B ELL WORK Chapter One: Book introduction Grab the Chapter One Book Overview worksheet and a book Work on Chapter One Book Overview

2 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. O BJECTIVE Topic: Athletic Trainer as a Health Care Provider Do: Describe what an athletic trainer is L.O.T.: Understanding

3 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. P RINCIPLES OF A THLETIC T RAINING 14 TH E DITION William E. Prentice

4 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. U NIT 1: T HE A THLETIC T RAINER AS A H EALTH C ARE P ROVIDER

5 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. What do you think this chapter is about?

6 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. C HAPTER O NE B OOK O VERVIEW Professional Development & Responsibilities and The athletic trainer as a health care provider Patient, Athletic training clinic, Evidence-based medicine, ATC Certified athletic trainer 5 and Sports medicine umbrella areas of specialization Employment settings for athletic trainers 6 6 License

7 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. W HAT IS AN ATHLETIC TRAINER ? Write down in your notes 12 words or less on the white board

8 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. A N A THLETIC T RAINER : Specializes in preventing, recognizing, managing and rehabilitating injuries Function as a member of a health care team Provide a critical link between the medical community and physically active individuals

9 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. H ISTORICAL P ERSPECTIVE Early History Existed in Greek and Roman civilizations Athletic trainers came into existence in the late 19 th century Early treatments involved rubs, counter- irritants, home remedies and poultices

10 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. E VOLUTION OF C ONTEMPORARY A THLETIC T RAINER Traditional setting of practice included colleges and secondary schools Today certified athletic trainers (ATC) work in a variety of settings and with a variety of patient populations

11 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. C HANGING F ACE OF A THLETIC T RAINING P ROFESSION Role of the athletic trainer is a health care provider 40% of athletic trainers are employed (clinics, hospitals, industrial and occupational settings) not just sports Has resulted in changes in athletic training education

12 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. W HAT D OES THAT M EAN ? Requires terminology changes (not just sports) Patients and clients vs. athletes Athletic clinic or facility vs. athletic training room Athletic trainers – NOT TRAINERS!!

13 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. W HAT IS AN ATHLETIC TRAINER ? Look back at your definition from the beginning of class Rewrite it in 12 words or less

14 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. B ELL W ORK Who is someone in sports that could make you a better athlete (performance enhancement)? Who is someone in sports medicine that can help you after an injury (injury care and management)?

15 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. O BJECTIVE Topic: What is Sports Medicine Do: Choose and justify a member of the sports medicine team or ATC (certified athletic trainer) setting L.O.T.: Evaluate

16 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. S PORTS M EDICINE AND A THLETIC T RAINING Broad field of medical practices related to physical activity and sport Involves a number of specialties involving active populations Typically classified as relating to Performance Enhancement or Injury Care and Management

17 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Practice of Medicine Performance Enhancement Injury Care & Management Exercise Physiology Biomechanics Sport Psychology Strength Conditioning Sports Physical Therapy Athletic Training Personal Fitness Trainers Sports Massage Sports Podiatry/ Orthotists Sports Dentistry

18 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. P AIR AND S HARE FROM B ELL W ORK Look back at your profession of Performance Enhancer and Injury Care & Management person Did you classify the profession correctly Share with your partner

19 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. E ACH PROFESSION HAS A PROFESSIONAL SPORTS MEDICINE ORGANIZATIONS International Federation of Sports Medicine (1928) American Academy of Family Physicians (1947) National Athletic Trainers Association (1950) American College of Sports Medicine (1954) American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (1972) National Strength and Conditioning Association (1978) American Academy of Pediatrics, Sports Committee (1979) Sports Physical Therapy Section of APTA (1981) NCAA Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports (1985) National Academy of Sports Medicine (1987)

20 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. ATC S O RGANIZATIONS NATA: National Athletic Trainers Association Athletic trainers national professional organization AZATA: Arizona Athletic Trainers Association State professional organization

21 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. N ATIONAL A THLETIC T RAINERS A SSOCIATION (NATA) To enhance the quality of health care for athletes and those engaged in physical activity To advance the profession of athletic training through education and research in the prevention, evaluation, management and rehabilitation of injuries

22 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Figure 1-1

23 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. E MPLOYMENT S ETTINGS FOR THE A THLETIC T RAINER Employment opportunities are becoming increasingly diverse Due largely to the efforts of the NATA Started out primarily in the collegiate setting Progressed to high schools Now many are found in hospital and clinic settings

24 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Settings include: Clinics and hospitals Physician extenders Industrial/Occupational settings Corporate settings Colleges or Universities Secondary schools School districts Professional sports Amateur/Recreational/Youth sports Performing arts Military & Law enforcement Health & fitness clubs

25 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Figure 1-3

26 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. D ISCUSSION & T ICKET O UT 1. Turn to page 8 Table 1-1 Employment settings for the Athletic Trainer 2. Find 2 job settings you are interested in. 3. Write down the 2 jobs and why on sheet 4. Discuss with your small group what you are interested in and why 5. Need to turn in sheet in order to leave

27 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. B ELL W ORK Who are some of the people/ patients an ATC (certified athletic trainer) can work with?

28 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. O BJECTIVE : Topic: The Sports Medicine Populations Do: Describe the different sports medicine populations and patients L.O.T.: Understanding

29 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. G ROUP D ISCUSSION Make a list of the various populations/ patients on your white board who an ATC can work with

30 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. A THLETIC T RAINERS - T REAT THE P HYSICALLY A CTIVE P OPULATIONS Can work with athletic, recreational or competitive activities and athletes Can work with anyone who requires physical skills and utilizes strength, power, endurance, speed, flexibility, range of motion and agility

31 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. The Adolescent Athlete Focuses on organized competition A number of sociological issues are involved How old or when should a child begin training? Skeletal maturity presents some challenges Physically and emotional adolescents can not be managed the same way as adults

32 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. T HUMB U P / D OWN & W HY Should a 5 year old do full tackle football? You can treat a 2 nd grade athlete the same as a college athlete A 100 pound freshman with no experience should do tackling drills against a 200 pound starting senior.

33 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. The Aging Athlete Physiological and performance capability changes overtime Function will increase and decrease Biological and sociological effects High levels of physiological function can be maintained through an active lifestyle Anyone who begins an exercise program

34 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Exercise program should be gradual and progressive Individuals over age 40 should have physical and exercise testing before engaging in an exercise program

35 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. T HUMBS U P / D OWN & W HY The first day a 50 y/o (year old) works out, there does not need to be any restrictions or worries. There is an increase and decrease of performance over an athletes lifetime One can workout throughout their lifetime (you cant be too old)

36 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Occupational Athlete Occupational, industrial or worker athlete are involved in strenuous, demanding or repetitive physical activity Involves Instruction on ergonomic techniques Intervention when injuries arise Injury prevention is still critical

37 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. L ISTING - S PECIAL P OPULATION H ANDOUT List 2 different areas, types or examples of patients found in each age population Adolescent Aging Occupational How would you treat each different Need to turn in as leave

38 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. B ELL W ORK List as many things (roles and responsibilities) you believe an athletic trainer can do or does

39 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. O BJECTIVE : Topic: Roles & Responsibilities of an ATC (certified athletic trainer) Do: Distinguish the Roles & Responsibilities of an ATC L.O.T.: Understanding

40 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. R OLES & R ESPONSIBILITIES OF THE A THLETIC T RAINER Charged with injury prevention and health care provision for an injured patient Athletic trainer deals with the patient and injury from its inception until the athlete returns to full competition

41 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. S MALL GROUP List as many things (roles and responsibilities/ domains) what an athletic trainer does and can do Write on the white boards

42 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. T HE 6 R OLES AND R ESPONSIBILITIES : B OARD OF C ERTIFICATION (BOC) D OMAINS Prevention Clinical evaluation and diagnosis Immediate care Treatment, rehabilitation and reconditioning Health care administration Professional responsibilities

43 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

44 P REVENTION Page 14-15 Go to your textbook Look on page 14-15 Read the Prevention paragraphs and fill in the blanks in your notes

45 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Prevention Conduct pre-participation exams Ensure appropriate training and conditioning programs Monitoring environmental conditions Selecting, properly fitting, and maintaining protective equipment Making sure that an athlete is eating properly Ensure appropriate medication use while discouraging substance abuse

46 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. S MALL GROUP D ISCUSSION / L IST Our class is called Prevention and Care of Athletic I njuries In small group List at least 4 class units you believe that we will go over this year Write on white board

47 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Clinical Evaluation & Diagnosis Recognize nature and extent of injury On and off-field evaluation skills and techniques Understand pathology of injuries and illnesses Referring to medical care and supportive services

48 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Immediate Care Administration of appropriate first aid and emergency medical care (CPR, AED) Activation of emergency action plans (EAP)

49 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Treatment, Rehabilitation Reconditioning Design preventative training systems Rehabilitation program design and supervision Incorporation of therapeutic modalities and exercise Offering psychosocial intervention

50 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Organization & Administration Record keeping Ordering supplies and equipment Establishing policies and procedures Supervising personnel

51 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Professional Responsibilities Athletic trainer as educator Athletic trainer and continuing education Athletic trainers as counselor Athletic trainers as researcher Incorporation of evidence medicine and participating and acquisition of evidence for efficacy of patient care

52 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. P ERSONAL Q UALITIES OF THE A THLETIC T RAINER Stamina and the ability to adapt Empathy Sense of humor Communication Intellectual curiosity Ethical practice Professional memberships

53 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. G ROUP W ORK - S ORT Get a pile of cards and sort each responsibility under the correct Role/ Domain Prevention Clinical evaluation and diagnosis Immediate care Treatment, rehabilitation and reconditioning Health care administration Professional responsibilities

54 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. C LOSURE - T ICKET O UT List the 6 Roles & Responsibilities on a sheet of paper

55 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. B ELLWORK Who do you think is the top 3 individuals closest to the athlete that would be considered the primary Sports Medicine Team?

56 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. O BJECTIVE Topic: The Sports Medicine Team Do: Choose and justify each member of the sports medicine team L.O.T.: Evaluate

57 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. W HO IS P ART OF THE S PORTS M EDICINE T EAM ? Athlete (Parents Under 18) Athletic Trainer Physician Coach

58 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. A THLETIC T RAINER Major concern injured patient All decisions impact the patient The injured patient must always be informed Must be educate about injury prevention and management Instructions regarding training and conditioning

59 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. P ARENTS The parents decision regarding healthcare is the primary consideration Insurance plans may dictate care Selection of physician

60 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. T EAM P HYSICIAN Serves to advise and supervise ATC Physician and the athletic trainer must be able to work together Have similar philosophical opinions regarding injury management

61 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. T EAM P HYSICIAN R ESPONSIBLE Compiling medical histories Conducting physical exams (Pre-participation screening) Diagnosing injury Deciding on disqualifications

62 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Potentially serve as the academic program medical director

63 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. T HE C OACH Must understand specific role of all individuals Understand limits of their ability to function as a health care provider Directly responsible for injury prevention

64 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. C OACH Aware of risks associated with sport Provide appropriate training and equipment Should be certified in CPR and first aid Knowledge of skills, techniques and environmental factors associated with sport Develop good working relationships with staff, including athletic trainers

65 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. G ALLERY W ALK Around the room is posters with each member of the Sports Medicine Team Athlete Physician Coach Athletic Trainer Write down duties for that member You will have 30 seconds to 1 minute at each member

66 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. HIPPA WITH C OMMUNICATION Must be aware of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Regulates dissemination (distribution) of health information Protects patients privacy Limits the people who could gain access to medical records

67 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. R EFERRING THE P ATIENT TO O THER P ERSONNEL The athletic trainer must be aware of available medical and non-medical personnel Patient may require special treatment outside of the traditional sports medicine team Must be aware of community based services and various insurance plans

68 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Exercise Physiologist Biomechanist Nutritionist Sport Psychologist Coaches Strength & Conditioning Specialist Social Worker Neurologist Emergency Medical Technician Physicians Dentist Podiatrist Nurse Physicians Assistant Physical Therapist Occupational Therapist Massage Therapist Ophthalmologist Dermatologist Gynecologist Support Health Services & Personnel

69 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. R ETURN TO P LAY S CENARIO Need to answer yes or no to each question and why

70 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. H OMEWORK Unit One Worksheet

71 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. B ELLWORK What steps do you think you will have to do in order to be an ATC (certified athletic trainer)?

72 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. A CCREDITED A THLETIC T RAINING E DUCATION P ROGRAMS Entry-level athletic training education programs Undergraduate programs (Bachelors) or Entry-level masters programs Advanced graduate (Masters) athletic training education programs Individuals that are already ATCs (certified athletic trainers)

73 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. W HAT DOES ONE NEED TO KNOW BEFORE BECOMING AN ATC?

74 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. A THLETIC T RAINING E DUCATION C OMPETENCIES Twelve Content Areas Risk management Pathology of injuries and illnesses Orthopedic clinical examination & diagnosis Acute care Pharmacological aspects of injury and illness Therapeutic modalities

75 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 12 A THLETIC T RAINING E DUCATION C OMPETENCIES CONT. Conditioning & rehabilitative exercise General medical conditions and disabilities Nutritional aspects of injury and illnesses Psychosocial intervention and referral Health care administration Professional development & responsibilities

76 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. R EQUIREMENTS FOR C ERTIFICATION AS AN A THLETIC T RAINER Formal academic preparation Supervised practical experience Guidelines are set by the Board of Certification (BOC)

77 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. N ATIONAL BOC (B OARD OF C ERTIFICATION ) E XAM Examination is computer based Includes the 6 domains Prevention Evaluation and diagnosis Immediate care Treatment, rehabilitation & reconditioning Organization and administration Professional responsibility

78 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. P ASSED THE E XAM The person is now BOC certified as an athletic trainer Credential of ATC Can know be legally called an athletic trainer BOC certification is a prerequisite for licensure in most states

79 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. NATA W ORKSHEET Computer lab


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