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INJURIES IN THE YOUNG ATHETE INJURY PREVENTION SYMPOSIUM.

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Presentation on theme: "INJURIES IN THE YOUNG ATHETE INJURY PREVENTION SYMPOSIUM."— Presentation transcript:

1 INJURIES IN THE YOUNG ATHETE INJURY PREVENTION SYMPOSIUM

2 The heightened intensity of training and competition among young athletes places them at increased risk for both acute and chronic injuries

3 Why are children susceptible to injury? I. Developmental Factors II. Varying athletic Ability III. Unsupervised athletic activities IV. Increase in intense training at younger ages and participation in multiple sports.

4 THE MIRACLE OF PUBERTY

5 NEISS National Electronic Injury Surveillance System Primary Purpose: Provide timely data on consumer product- related injuries occurring in the U.S.A Data collected from 100 selected Emergency Departments as a probability sample of all the 5,300 U.S. hospitals By Groupings eg. Sports and Recreational Equipment, Yard and Garden Equipment(59,155 hand garden tool injuries 2009), Home Furnishings & Fixtures(246,733 ladder or stool injuries 2009)

6 NEISS 2009 SPORTS AND RECREATIONAL EQUIPMENT Basketball injuries: 501,251 Baseball and softball injuries: 286,708 Football injuries: 451,961 Soccer injuries: 208,214 Track and Field Activities, Equipment: 22,191 Racquet Sports: 32,529 Nonpowder Guns, BBs Pellets: 22,630

7 KEY PLAYERS INJURY PREVENTION Medical staff- Team physician, athletic trainer, physical therapist, Coaches Athlete Parents

8 MEDICAL STAFF Injury Management Initial Diagnosis Define Treatment Plan Restore Normal Function after Healing of Injury Prevent Future Problems Education Communication

9 MEDICAL STAFF What is the goal? Return to Play Preserving the health of the athletes present and future High rates of osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction Defining impact of injury on future medical problems

10 RETURNING TO SPORTS Lengthen healing time if return from injury to soon Never exercise the injured part if you have pain during rest When pain stops at rest, start simple ROM exercises and progress to strengthening Return gradually to sports specific training altering progression based on recurrent pain or swelling Gradual increase sports intensity until back to preinjury level

11 COACHES What is your role? Educator Role model Encourager Mother or father figure

12 PARENTS

13 INJURY PREVENTION Always use proper body mechanics in sports involving repetitive stress Listen to your body. Pain is the Good Lords warning sign Knee PWSMM Train for your sport Cross train for overall conditioning and to allow specific muscles to rest

14 INJURY PREVENTION Prepare for you sport, both physically and mentally Weekend warrior syndrome eg. Summer before ninth grade Balance training with rest Wear and use proper gear for your sport Understand the rules and follow them Warm up slowly before activity esp in sports requiring quick, dynamic movements

15 LOWER EXTREMITY INJURIES Ankle Injuries Knee injuries Lower Back Injuries

16 ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT

17 ACL TEAR Devastating injury to knee Most long term studies show OA in 60-70% of patients down the road after ACL injury despite successful surgical treatment and return to sports ACL tears occurring at all ages even as young as 6 years of age

18 ACL PREVENTION

19

20 CONCUSSION Definition: Traumatic injury to the brain that alters mental status or causes other symptoms

21 CONCUSSION Remember that a significant brain injury can occur without losing consciousness.

22 CONCUSSION SYMPTOMS Balance problem Difficulty communicating, concentrating Dizziness Drowsiness Fatigue Feeling emotional Feeling mentally foggy Headache Vomiting

23 CONCUSSION SYMPTOMS Irritability Memory difficulties Nausea Nervousness Numbness or tingling Sadness Sensitivity to light or noise Sleeping more than usual or difficulty falling asleep

24 CONCUSSION How do we prevent concussions? Better equipment eg. State of the Art Helmets Better treatment Avoid second impact syndrome Neuropsychological Testing

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26 PREVENTING HEAT ILLNESS Ensure proper acclimatization at the beginning of the workout session Evaluate weather condition for temperature, humidity, and sunlight Schedule rest in the shade Identify participants at particular risk Hydrate before practice and competition Have chilled fluids readily available at the practice site

27 PREVENTING HEAT ILLNESSES Enforce periodic drinking Never use water restriction as a form of discipline Discourage deliberate dehydration for weight loss Make appropriate clothing adjustments Schedule events to avoid peak hours of heat and sun Educate players and parents Record daily weights to ensure adequate rehydration between practices

28 THANKS FOR YOUR ATTENTION


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